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  1. #1
    Lounger
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    Hello everybody,

    I recently bought a router which I installed in my room. The router offers a feature that allows you to connect an USB Printer to it, so that anyone on the network can access the printer. The problem is that my printer is currently in the living room, and cannot be connected directly through a cable to the router. I was wondering if some solution exists that allows a wireless connection (from, say a pair of USB wireless adapters) to be perceived as a cable connection, with neither device (or at least the printer) being able to tell the difference. Is there a way to fake a cable connection through a wireless medium using USB?

    Thanks for the help!

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Hi Karlo!

    Do you have a wireless router or an Ethernet router? The difference is a wireless router has wireless capability built in as well as Ethernet ports for connecting with Ethernet cabling. If you have only an Ethernet router, then you would need to purchase a wireless router.

    If your router is a wireless model, you can purchase a wireless print server that connects to your printer via USB cable. This will allow your computers to print through your router connections. You can find these with an internet search. Check out this link for some ideas on wireless print servers.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Shepard View Post
    Hi Karlo!

    Do you have a wireless router or an Ethernet router? The difference is a wireless router has wireless capability built in as well as Ethernet ports for connecting with Ethernet cabling. If you have only an Ethernet router, then you would need to purchase a wireless router.

    If your router is a wireless model, you can purchase a wireless print server that connects to your printer via USB cable. This will allow your computers to print through your router connections. You can find these with an internet search. Check out this link for some ideas on wireless print servers.
    Hello Gerald,

    I currently have two wireless routers installed in my network, one from my ISP and another to use as the main hub in my network (it handles all the wireless and wired connections and relays them to the other router). The router I have from my ISP is a Thomson TG782 and the other router I recently purchased is an ASUS RT-N16. The ISP router is pre-configured by my ISP and has many of its features locked or are inaccessible. I bought the ASUS router to make it easier to configure my network and make use of some of the features it offers, one of which is printer sharing working as a print server. Is it still necessary to purchase a standalone print server? Or can I modify or use my current setup somehow to suit my needs?

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    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Your router seems to have a print server, but the problem is you have the printer in a totally different area of the house. If you can relocate your Asus router close enough to the printer to connect via USB, or if you can place the printer so it can connect via USB to the router, it should work.

    I am not familiar with the Asus router; I only saw on NewEgg that it has a built in print server. You should therefore check out the router with Asus and research it to see if it will meet your needs. The link I gave you listed several print servers, including USB models that take very little space and should work in the room where you planned to use the printer.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  5. #5
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    Ahh... I understand. I'm still a bit cloudy, however. If I were to install a separate print server, would I have to add it to my already existing network? Or does it live in its own separate network? If so, can it cause interference between the already existing network? Does the device detect the printer model or do I have to install a driver somehow?

    I'm now doing a little bit of research into my alternatives, to see which one suits my situation best. I've previously setup network access to this printer through a computer, but that doesn't seem like an option now that I'm running Windows 7 in some PCs and Windows XP in others. The printer server will probably be the best option right now, if I can't manage to move the printer closer to the router so I can hook it up through an USB port. Although if that proves ineffective, I might also consider the installation of a new printer altogether.

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    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    If you could just relocate your printer close to your wireless router, you could hook the printer to the router via Ethernet if the printer is a network printer (ie, has an ethernet port). Then set a static IP address for the printer, and every PC in your network will be able to use the printer. No other purchase would be necessary.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

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    5 Star Lounger
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    I've previously setup network access to this printer through a computer, but that doesn't seem like an option now that I'm running Windows 7 in some PCs and Windows XP in others
    ????

    Windows 7 and Windows XP will happily share a printer between them that is connected to one of them...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mercyh View Post
    ????

    Windows 7 and Windows XP will happily share a printer between them that is connected to one of them...
    Well, it worked great back when Vista was installed on my machines, but ever since upgrading to Windows 7 the software installation for the printer never recognized it. Now I think it might be even harder, since I installed Steady State on both of the PCs that have XP. But I might try it again now anyway, since there might have been an update on the printer's software.

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    what is your printer model?

  10. #10
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    I should have posted that when I made the thread, but I seem to have forgotten. It's pretty old though, a Lexmark X5150.

  11. #11
    5 Star Lounger
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    Lexmark says to use the Vista driver on Windows 7.

    It is available here: http://support.lexmark.com/index?loc...ment=SUPPORT#2

    It does not include the scanning package that worked on Windows XP so if this is something you use, I would set it up with the direct connection on one of the XP machines. Once you have it setup and working, be sure it is shared on the XP machine and that you have the same username and password on all the machine with which you wish to share it.

    Now go to one of the 7 machines and go to the network. Browse to the Windows XP machine that is sharing the printer, double click it and if everything is setup correctly you will see the shares including the printer. Double click the printer and if you are lucky it will just connect and work. If it does not, it will ask for a windows 7 driver. In this case you will need to download the correct driver from the link above and unzip it. You will then need to point to the folder where the driver is unzipped when you are asked to supply the driver.

    If all goes well you should be able to print to the shared printer just like you did before you changed to Windows 7. Of course the machine sharing the printer will have to be turned on for the printer to be available to the rest of the network.

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