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  1. #1
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    how do i change from a two disk RAID 0 arrangement to a single disk arrangement after one disk has failed? Is this possible? Are there settings in the BIOS to enact this change? Any and all help will be appreciated. Windows Vista Home Premium, Core 2, 2.5MHz, 4GB RAM, 750 GB HDD, SATA

  2. #2
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    Single disk failure in a RAID 0 array = data loss.
    Do not change any settings until you have successfully backed up what is left of your data.

    To change a RAID 0 array to non RAID requires destruction of the disk partition and loss of all data. You first need to backup all data, then destroy the RAID and re-create the partition on the disks.

    Are you sure it's RAID 0 (space of disk = drive 1 space + drive 2 space) or is it RAID 1 (space of disk = drive 1 space)

    cheers, Paul

  3. #3
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    Hey PT - Thank you so much for the post. The arrangement is RAID 0, striped across both disks. I am prepared to lose the data as a backup exists of the documents and other personal information. I have the original DELL disks for reinstalling the OS and drivers. I've never changed the drive arrangement from a RAID to single disk and want to be sure that I will be able to do this using the one, good disk from the RAID. I want to reformat the existing disk and then install the OS and drivers. Does doing this remove the RAID or is there a BIOS setting that also needs to be changed? I've worked with RAID 1 and 5 in an enterprise setting but this is a computer in a client's home, used as the configuration computer for his router and home network. Thanks again for your post, I appreciate the help I receive from everyone here.

  4. #4
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    It depends!!
    If the RAID is in software in Windows you will need to re-install Windows after booting from the Windows CD and re-partitioning the disk.
    If the RAID is in hardware on the machine you will need to go into the BIOS/RAID set up and re-create the drive as a single disk, then re-install Windows.
    Either way you need to re-build the disk as a single disk, preferably with about 50GB for the OS and the rest for data - makes backup and recovery easier.

    cheers, Paul

  5. #5
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    Thank you so much, Paul! I've been able to wipe out the RAID volume in the BIOS and then go back in and re-install Windows. My customer wants to retain the RAID 0 configuration so I am now in the process of migrating back into the RAID arrangement. I did not replace either HDD as I was unable to tell which disk had the write error on it. So far I have been able to see any error on either disk. If the error reappears I will install the new HDD I have if the error returns. I would appreciate it if you know how to determine which HDD is the one with the error when the computer only reports the error as being in the RAID volume.

  6. #6
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    It sounds like you have hardware RAID? You need to change the settings in the BIOS / controller card to remove the RAID (RAID 0 is bad m'kay).

    The disk manufacturers provide diagnostic software you can download. Get the ISO version and burn it to CD, then boot from the CD and test the disks.

    cheers, Paul

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by P T View Post
    It sounds like you have hardware RAID? You need to change the settings in the BIOS / controller card to remove the RAID (RAID 0 is bad m'kay).

    The disk manufacturers provide diagnostic software you can download. Get the ISO version and burn it to CD, then boot from the CD and test the disks.

    cheers, Paul
    AMEN......

    If you value your data (and sanity) break that raid0. If the reason for raid0 is to increase the disk size, single disks of quite large size are available for very little $$ per gig these days and you only have one point of failure to lose your data from. If the reason for raid0 is faster disk I/O you are going to see very little boost.

    IF you are hardware RAID and lose your motherboard or controller and cannot get your hands on exactly the same make/model, there is a very good chance you will lose the data on the disks even if the disks are still good as you will not be able to reassemble the raid volume. This leaves you with three unrecoverable points of failure (disk1, disk2 and controller).

    Many motherboards with SATA based raid have SATA ports on the board labeled with the raid versions they support (there will be block of 4 or 5 sata ports on the board, if you plug into #1 and #2 it will create a RAID0, while plugging into #1 and #3 creates a RAID1, etc)

  8. #8
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    I stripped out the RAID array and then created a new RAID 0 (as the customer wanted this). After the recreation of the RAID volume the disk error vanished and the computer has been operating normally for two weeks now. I appreciate the advice of those who responded to my initial and subsequent postings. With the ideas shared here and a little research of my own, I was able to have the computer up and running with an upgrade installation of Windows 7 in about 3-4 hours. Thanks so much for the help!

  9. #9
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    Shoot that customer - after telling them exactly why they do not want RAID 0!

    cheers, Paul

  10. #10
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    Indeed! The performance gain isn't enough to offset the inherent problems with a RAID 0 array. Oh well, not my system, is about all that I can say. I did enjoy the education in RAID I received. That, alone, was worth the headache of a rebuild. Thank you for your kind support during the process. It's always nice to walk away from an experience knowing you've learned something useful...and to have gained a new comrade in the "tech wars".

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