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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    I am going to take a trip in the near future, and plan to take my laptop with me so I can keep in email contact along the way among other reasons. I've done some research on the subject, and if I understand what I have read I can move my primary email account to my laptop simply by copying my "Outlook.pst" file from my desktop (Outlook 2007 running on 64-bit Windows 7) to my laptop (Outlook 2007 running on 32-bit Windows 7), then simply continue to use the account "on the road" as I do at home.

    Is this true? My first thought is that it seems too simple to be true, but that is my understanding. Note that although the software and versions are both the same in both machines, but the desktop is 64-bit and the laptop is 32-bit version of Windows 7. Also, when I return home, I am going to want to transfer the file back again to my desktop, but can it really be as simple as simply transferring a single file? I'd appreciate hearing from anyone out there who has any experience in doing this, and I thank you in advance for any guidance and help before I corrupt or otherwise damage what is probably the most used and arguably most important single file in my computer. <sigh>

    David E. Cann

  2. #2
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    This should work fine. I have copied pst files between computers and over full restores and between different versions of Outlook.

    The 32-bit/64-bit is not an issue - that's the processor not the data. The disk formatting does not change with the processor.

    Neil

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    Don't forget to backup your mail file to a USB/CD in case your laptop goes west.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Watson View Post
    This should work fine. I have copied pst files between computers and over full restores and between different versions of Outlook.

    The 32-bit/64-bit is not an issue - that's the processor not the data. The disk formatting does not change with the processor.

    Neil

    I've always adhered to the philosophy that "if it seems to be too good (or simple in this case) to be true, then it probably is, but this appears to be an exception to the rule, thankfully. :-) Thanks for the reply. I will sure give it a try, but I can't help the gnawing feeling I am missing something somewhere.

    David E. Cann

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by P T View Post
    Don't forget to backup your mail file to a USB/CD in case your laptop goes west.

    cheers, Paul

    I back up my Outlook.pst file daily as a matter of routine already, but that is a good suggestion.

    David E. Cann

  6. #6
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    What you described is how I move personal folders *.pst from an old computer to a new one when upgrading a users computer.
    the exchange part (*.ost) is just a matter of configuring the new computer, if you are on exchange.

    For backing up, I would suggest Microsofts pfbackup.exe. Back personal folder up to a USB stick, external drive or even better a network location that is backed up to tape or disk routinely.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Jam View Post
    What you described is how I move personal folders *.pst from an old computer to a new one when upgrading a users computer.
    the exchange part (*.ost) is just a matter of configuring the new computer, if you are on exchange.

    For backing up, I would suggest Microsofts pfbackup.exe. Back personal folder up to a USB stick, external drive or even better a network location that is backed up to tape or disk routinely.

    I already use the backup utility you suggested. It is excellent and I use it daily, but that is not what I was asking about though. My query was about transferring my Outlook.pst file to another computer, and that has been answered, but I thank you for the response.

    David E. Cann

  8. #8
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by decann View Post
    ...if I understand what I have read I can move my primary email account to my laptop simply by copying my "Outlook.pst" file from my desktop (Outlook 2007 running on 64-bit Windows 7) to my laptop (Outlook 2007 running on 32-bit Windows 7), then simply continue to use the account "on the road" as I do at home.
    The actual login information is, for security reasons, not stored in the PST. So you will need to re-setup the account the first time.

    It can be a bit tricky avoiding duplicate messages when you use a single PST on two PCs. I'm sure others can suggest a solution to that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscher2000 View Post
    The actual login information is, for security reasons, not stored in the PST. So you will need to re-setup the account the first time.

    It can be a bit tricky avoiding duplicate messages when you use a single PST on two PCs. I'm sure others can suggest a solution to that.

    Yeah, I thought about that. The account is already in my laptop and has been used before, though independent of my main desktop account, but I will check that before making the move just to be sure. Thanks.

    David E. Cann

  10. #10
    2 Star Lounger bobdog's Avatar
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    There's a much easier way, from where I sit. Get a free account at LogMeIn and leave your home machine running, with the screen turned off and the machine locked. Then log in remotely when you want to check mail. I can't remember staying at a hotel that doesn't have wireless. When you're done, just lock the machine again and log out. Another advantage of this approach is that you don't have to worry about copying over all your docs and internet bookmarks between the two machines.

    I remember an old line that says "Never ask a man with two wristwatches for the time, because he doesn't really know for sure."


  11. #11
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobdog View Post
    Get a free account at LogMeIn and leave your home machine running, with the screen turned off and the machine locked. Then log in remotely when you want to check mail.
    I love LogMeIn, but if you want to work with Outlook mail folders (open, search, read, move messages, etc.), the speed of remote access screen redraws simply can't compete with the speed of working with Outlook locally. Since the display of the machine I'm accessing is 1680x1050, there are some trade-offs in the display quality/ease of use on the laptop as well. Of course, my pain may be partially due to heavily taxed bandwidth...

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