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  1. #1
    Lounger
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    First, I want to say that I realize Windows Secrets doesn't guarantee or recommend any programs listed on their newsletter. However, I tried Reimage repair pgm and ran into a big problem. After I ran the repair, I couldn't use my TaxWise program. All that came up was a blank screen with the name at the top. When I tried to run System Restore, I had the same result. After many emails and Remote Assistance, they finally said they would give me my money back. Luckily, I ran the XP CD in repair mode and it fixed everything, thank goodness. All I can say is "Buyer Beware".

  2. #2
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Kovacs View Post
    First, I want to say that I realize Windows Secrets doesn't guarantee or recommend any programs listed on their newsletter. However, I tried Reimage repair pgm and ran into a big problem. After I ran the repair, I couldn't use my TaxWise program. All that came up was a blank screen with the name at the top. When I tried to run System Restore, I had the same result. After many emails and Remote Assistance, they finally said they would give me my money back. Luckily, I ran the XP CD in repair mode and it fixed everything, thank goodness. All I can say is "Buyer Beware".
    And before running any Windows "System Repair" program or service, make a full image system backup onto an external hard drive. You never know what these programs or services will decide to "repair" for you. I prefer to do my own system repairs and optimization, with all the full controls in my own hands. That means using several system utilities, but I have never hosed a program or my Windows installation by doing optimizations myself.

    And as for the Windows Secrets advertising policies, I have seen many web sites and newsletters which do a whole lot poorer job of selecting their advertisers than Windows Secrets. I would be inclined to cut the folks some slack on this one.
    -- Bob Primak --

  3. #3
    Silver Lounger
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    Bob, hello.

    Your advice to make an image before doing any "hard" stuff on any machine is warranted. I have used Acronis for a few years and not having had any hiccup at all with it, I stick to it.

    It has saved my bacon a few times. FWIW.

    I find now that doing the Acronis clone from the main computor, takes up to 1 hour and 20 minutes, doing a clone with a BRM takes 17 minutes for the same work. What is your experience ?

    Have a great weekend. JP.

  4. #4
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Parrot View Post
    Bob, hello.

    Your advice to make an image before doing any "hard" stuff on any machine is warranted. I have used Acronis for a few years and not having had any hiccup at all with it, I stick to it.

    It has saved my bacon a few times. FWIW.

    I find now that doing the Acronis clone from the main computor, takes up to 1 hour and 20 minutes, doing a clone with a BRM takes 17 minutes for the same work. What is your experience ?

    Have a great weekend. JP.
    By your use of the term BRM (Backup Restore Manager) I asume you mean a business-grade Network backup resource. This would be similar to backing up from outside of Windows on a stand-alone PC, if I am getting the term correct.

    I do not run a computer network, but I do know that in a network environment, making a clone can be very fast, compared with backing up a partition to a USB drive while that partition is active. Acronis should only slow down over time if the partition is growing for some reason (as 64-bit Windows tends to do if it is not cleaned up using 64-bit specific cleanup utilities, such as Glary Utilities ). Basically, anything done without the bottlenecks of USB and background processes will be a faster, more reliable backup.

    Other than that, I cannot address the question of BRM vs. Windows-based backups.

    My own 12GB to 20GB of Windows OS and Programs (Win XP Pro SP3 32-bit) backs up to an external USB drive from within Windows at Acronis "High Priority" in less than 20 mins. and creates an archive around 10GB file size. This is using a Pentium-4 Mobile single-core processor. The time does not increase unless I add something to the partition. I always do Full Image Backups, not Increments. I use both the Acronis System Cleanup utility (part of True Image) and CCleaner to reduce clutter before making backups. I do not store my data on my Windows partition, but on a separate Data Partition, which I sync or copy using the built-in Windows tools.

    Virus scanning is taking longer as my data files grow in number, but backup does not take any longer.
    -- Bob Primak --

  5. #5
    Lounger
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    Bob, good evening.

    As you might have seen, I lost my old history and just now found a way to access it somehow. In a post to me before the loss, you said :

    >>> By your use of the term BRM (Backup Restore Manager) I asume you mean a business-grade Network backup resource.

    Not in the least, BRM stands for : Bootable Rescue Media, and is done from the Acronis programme. I use a small 3.5" CD, the app needs around 35 MBs to get all of Acronis True Image going. With thw small CD, I can do all that the big CD does and it is shirt pocket size too.

    Belated reply, sorry. Jean.

  6. #6
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Running any software that claims it will fix something (anything) for you is at best, iffy. If it came from MS, take out the "IF" and make that positive.
    I recently ran a fixit program from MS and it completely Trashed my HD. I had to do a full restore of my C: drive from my latest Backup Image File, to get my HD back.

    These so called fix it programs that are being advertised on TV today, are equally bad, or worse. What a scam!

    But that's not to say don't ever try anything. Shucks, I try at least a half dozen new programs every week. I also do a Ghost backup at least once or twice a week and I force a new Restore Point every time I boot my PC. I may get several Restore Points in a day, but at least I have a fresh one when I need it.
    Before I do a whole drive backup, I delete all the junk files off'n my HD. Then I delete my Pagefile and all the old restore points. I've got a pretty clean HD before I ever start my backup. I reduce the size of the data going into my backup by at least 4 gigabytes and seriously reduce backup time.

    Sorry this ran long,
    The Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  7. #7
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Who View Post
    I recently ran a fixit program from MS and it completely Trashed my HD. I had to do a full restore of my C: drive from my latest Backup Image File, to get my HD back.
    Do you recall what the Fixit was and what symptoms it was meant to address?

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