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  1. #1
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    In my mind its bad, except for 3 features which shall be explained later.
    Its latest version, 2010's pdf file is 8.29mb which is hard to understand and complicated to use, I believe it was for this reason, Ted Myers tried to write his mini tutorial.
    When you open Acronis, its home page shows just how much useless (IMHO) features there are.
    ---
    If Acronis doubled its price I would still buy it. Here's why.
    --
    If my hdd suddenly 'died' I would be able to replace everything (without using Acronis) as all my important items are stored on 2 separate external hdd's and dvd/cd.
    ---
    If using Acronis, it saves time. Here's how.
    I only use the 'One Click' backup method. It only does full back-ups of C: drive + Master Boot Record. ( Acronis recommends full back ups for their ease of recovery.)
    To make my back up, I make a file, name it as current date, add the notepad containing all that's on or done to my PC, that way I know whats being replaced if needed.
    I usually keep 3 copy's as I have a large ext hdd and each full back up is under 5gb.
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    Recovery, I do within Windows ( Acronis recommended)
    ---
    Recovery media is my third item. You must ensure it works properly before its needed. You are not even required to 'press any key' to boot.
    ---
    Extract from Acronis Manual for recovery

    6.1 Restore under Windows or boot from CD?
    As mentioned above (see 2.3 Running Acronis True Image Home), Acronis True Image
    Home can be run in several ways. We recommend that you first try to restore data running
    Acronis True Image Home under Windows, because this method provides more functionality.
    Boot from the bootable media or use the Startup Recovery Manager (see 3.4 Acronis
    Startup Recovery Manager) only if Windows does not load.
    The boot CD, from which you loaded the program, does not keep you from using other CDs
    with backups. Acronis True Image Home is loaded entirely into RAM so you can remove the
    bootable CD to insert the archive disk.
    ---
    Extract for backup.

    The easiest way of backing up the system partition is using the One-Click Backup either during the
    first start of Acronis True Image Home after installation or later. This tool is intended for backing up
    only the system partition and MBR. Of course, you can use the Backup Wizard too, but here is the
    procedure for using the One-Click Backup tool (not during the first start).
    1. If you want to use your external drive for backing up the system partition, attach and power it on
    before starting Acronis True Image Home.
    Choose Tools & Utilities ? One-Click Backup in the main program menu. Acronis True Image Home
    will offer the destination for storing your backup (if you do not have the Acronis Secure Zone, the
    destination will be the attached external hard drive). If you would prefer another backup destination,
    click the link under the Archive location: line and select the storage location most suitable for you.
    1. By default the One-Click Backup tool schedules subsequent full backups of your system partition
    once every seven days, but you can change the interval between backups or cancel scheduling.
    2. After you finish settings, click Protect to start the backup task.
    It is recommended to validate the created backup by running a validation task either manually or on
    schedule.
    The Acronis One-Click Backup tool performs only full backups of the system partition; scheduling an incremental
    or differential backup is not possible.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I defintely do not agree. I find Acronis easy to use. It works as it was designed to work. It is a full featured app that has components everyone can use. I have never used the One Click Backup option, but use the other backup options regularly, and have restored my PC after I screwed something up on 3 seperate occasions, the last of which was when I screwed up removing a Linux partition. In each case it has worked exactly as described.

    My intent on starting the Instructions thread was to show those people who are afraid to Image how EASY it is to use Acronis for this operation. If Acronis does not suit your needs, then by all means find an app that does. Just do the image. Then you won't be asking in a later thread how to reinstall Win 7 (or whatever OS you use) (I do not mean you specifically roderunner, but a generic you refering to all those multitude of individuals that do not ever think of Imaging.)

    I believe this type of tutorial is definitely needed to get people to learn how to use their PCes for more than just checking e-mail and playing games. I would almost bet that there are many more in this category than those who actually do "play" with their OSes.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  3. #3
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Not so Good, ...for me at least.
    I've used Acronis previously with my Windows XP installations and found it to be something like 70-90% reliable when restoring images.
    The most anoying issue I had was the program would frequently get stuck while Acronis was loading from boot.
    ...And this was on two different computers
    One minor issue that used to irritate me to no end was the mouse cursor on the Acronis boot screen would only work one way; up and down on the screen.
    ...And this was on two different computers too.
    I'm also a software minimalist and I can't tolerate a bunch of running processes, which is common to Acronis.
    Acronis's is too feature rich for me. I just want a program that will run when I want to do an image, and that's all.

    I'll give the thumbs up to Paragon & Macrium. BootitNG, I've never scraped the nerve to try and use.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  4. #4
    3 Star Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Rossmere View Post
    Not so Good, ...for me at least.
    I've used Acronis previously with my Windows XP installations and found it to be something like 70-90% reliable when restoring images.
    The most anoying issue I had was the program would frequently get stuck while Acronis was loading from boot.
    ...And this was on two different computers
    So far I have never experienced this problem.

    I have to give Acronis a thumbs-up. As mentioned in other posts, Acronis has 'saved me' on numerous occasions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Rossmere View Post
    One minor issue that used to irritate me to no end was the mouse cursor on the Acronis boot screen would only work one way; up and down on the screen.
    ...And this was on two different computers too.
    I have not experienced this problem either. But the mouse moves WAY too fast ...
    Rick Groszkiewicz
    Life is too short to drink bad wine (or bad coffee!)

  5. #5
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    I defintely do not agree.
    Ted, read line 5 in my post.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  6. #6
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rgrosz View Post
    So far I have never experienced this problem.

    I have to give Acronis a thumbs-up. As mentioned in other posts, Acronis has 'saved me' on numerous occasions.

    I have not experienced this problem either. But the mouse moves WAY too fast ...
    The only time the mouse moves too fast is when using from 'boot' Backups can only be made from running in windows, Acronis recommend doing same for recovery.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  7. #7
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roderunner View Post
    Ted, read line 5 in my post.
    I guess I misread that you find Acronis too hard to use and that was what I disagree with. If so I'm sorry.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  8. #8
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    I guess I misread that you find Acronis too hard to use and that was what I disagree with. If so I'm sorry.
    Ted, I accept your apology. My reason for my post was to show my method of backing up, I have tried nearly everything for the simple reason, I have nothing else almost to do with my time and read instructions for use carefully beforehand. If I get stuck I can always come here.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  9. #9
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Most of the Acronis settings can usually be left alone. All one needs to do is select Incremental or Full Backup, and select what to back up and where to put it. And do yourself a favor, and create at least a brief comment on the condition of your system and some notes about what updates are included, at the time of the backup.

    In Recovery, often the safest way to do this is to use the hidden Recovery Partition or OEM Recovery Disks to get your computer back to a clean, like-new configuration, and then install the current Acronis from the Program Disk. Then run a Recovery from within Windows. An alternative is to use the Acronis Program Disk or the Recovery Media Disk, and do the restoration from there. Working from the Recovery Media, I once had a failure, with some not so subtle Windows glitches as a result of the restoration. But from within Windows, I have never had a failure or a glitch.

    As for multiple copies of the backup image in multiple locations, I am in complete agreement. I use one portable drive, one desktop drive, and a third drive which I store in a closet most of the time, for my backups. That's for each computer. The only tedious part is the creation of the original backup image. After that, it's just Copy/ (long wait) /paste. (The files are huge, so there is a long wait while they get copied. I usually have lunch or start my laundry while I'm waiting.)

    My point is, creating the backups is very easy if you do not dwell on all the options. I would almost say, forget the Manual, and just dive in and start using the program. It is that intuitive, if you understand at least the basics about what Image Backups are, and if you know a little bit about partitions. Recovery is not quite so straight-forward, and failures can happen. This is true of any backup solution which is attempting to restore a damaged or infected operating system and its programs. Things do not always go as planned.

    Overall, I like Acronis and have stuck with it for my new Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit laptop. There are free programs, and many of these are simpler to use, but they may not be as reliable, and if anything does go wrong, there is little or no technical support available. There are automatic backup schemes which are easier to use, but they are not as flexible as a full-scale backup and recovery program. But if you find anything which you like better, feel free to try it and use it. As long as you are doing something to back up your computer, you are miles ahead of the average home user. And you will rest at ease, knowing you have a backup strategy in case of disaster.
    -- Bob Primak --

  10. #10
    New Lounger
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    For those who seek truly reliable partition imaging, inert imaging via a program that runs entirely within its own operating system is the way to go. BootIt NG and the related program Image for DOS are rock-solid examples of such technology -- tiny programs that are not (or not necessarily) installed but run from a bootable CD. Over the past ten years, I have restored many BING and IFD images on many different computers, and have yet to encounter a failure.

  11. #11
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    The only problem I have experienced is that Bootit NG and others like it are not nearly as user friendly as Acronis or Macrium Reflect. Many of us are getting to the stage in life where we needs things that work easier, not more difficult. That was also my reaction to Clonezilla. It worked very effectively, but takes much more brain power to run, especially the first few times. That's one of the things I believe makes Aconis a better choice.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  12. #12
    New Lounger
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    My question is how does the Image feature built into Win 7 compare with Acronis? Is it as good? Should I also purchase Acronis?

  13. #13
    New Lounger
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    Ah, Acronis. Their often-inscrutable user interfaces, their oddly constructed foreign-accented English sentences, their usually useless program help -- for years, none of that deterred me from happily using their backup and disk partitioning programs. Despite the fact that the first time I used their partitioning sw (Partition Expert), it corrupted my hard drive due to a conflict w/ GoBack. [True story: I'm the reason their FAQ was edited to include "Does not work w/ GoBack."]

    Oh, and there was the year-long bug that, unbeknown to me, prevented my backups from being encrypted -- despite the fact that my settings included encryption. [The initial backup was encrypted, but True Image did not check the encryption option for incrementals. Nice.] But, any time I have ever needed to restore a file from an image, it was there -- so everything else was a minor quibble. I happily paid for their yearly upgrades.

    So, when it came time to upgrade to Windows 7 and select an imaging program, Acronis was at the top of my list. A couple of hours of Web research fixed that -- the Win 7 early releases of the imaging sw were obviously a disaster, and Acronis acknowledged that their tech support desk melted down from the load. So, I went with Norton Ghost and haven't had any problems. [Well, Ghost no longer sends me an e-mail when my backups are completed -- I'll have to look into that.]

  14. #14
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earl Lomelino View Post
    My question is how does the Image feature built into Win 7 compare with Acronis? Is it as good? Should I also purchase Acronis?
    Hi Earl, on behalf of the senior members 'Welcome to The Lounge'
    -
    W7 built in backup is not IMHO worth using unless you have a separate Ext HDD just for backups, it does something to them that I cannot explain, though they still work as usual, The size of backups are very large.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  15. #15
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Q. are you related to 'Sleeping Beauty' going by your joining date + first post, any way on behalf of the senior members 'Welcome to The Lounge'
    -
    As to Norton Ghost, my friend used it but he go totally annoyed with its constant pop ups when powering ON/OFF external HDD's He now has Acronis 2010, runs it same way as me (post #1) and is as happy as a dog with a bone
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

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