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Thread: DNS questions

  1. #1
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    Is it better to set the DNS server addresses in the router, connected to a cable modem, or should they be entered in the networking card?
    Which setting takes precedence?
    Should the router be set to get assigned DNS from the ISP automatically?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    T,

    I'd set it in the router then clear it in the network cards. Take a look at OPENDNS this is my prefered DNS server because it blocks a lot of really bad sites.
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

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  3. #3
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    Thanks.

    My ISP is Earthlink accessed through Time Warner. In the past I relied on the router getting DNS from Time Warner automatically. I suspect that for some reason the assigned DNS wasn't working with Earthlink. Perhaps TW was relying on Earthlink to assign the DNS and there was a breakdown in communication in the process. However, that's just speculation on my behalf. The last time I lost connectivity, I used the Google DNS in the router and restored connectivity. I have since changed to Open DNS and have started to wonder where the addresses should be entered for best results.

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    5 Star Lounger
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    The dns settings in the router have no affect on the PC's connected to the router unless the router itself is the DNS server for the PC's.

    Let's look at the following scenarios.

    1. Router's INTERNAL LAN ip address is 192.168.1.1 and router is the DNS server for the internal network. (to confirm this, run an IPCONFIG \ALL on a PC and the [s]DHCP[/s] DNS server line will have the router's 192.168.1.1 IP address assigned)
    In this situation the Router will go to the DNS servers you have assigned on it and pass the DNS information it gets forward to the PC.

    2. Router is setup as the DHCP server and is handing IP's to the PCs. Router is not the DNS server but hands the settings it has forward to the PCs
    In this situation the DNS servers you have assigned on the router are passed forward to the PC. If you run an IPCONFIG \ALL on the PC the [s]DHCP[/s] DNS server line(s) will show the servers that you have assigned on the router.

    3. You are manually assigning STATIC addresses to your PCs.
    In this situation the PC will use whatever you assign and will not even see the settings on the router unless you assign the router itself (see #1)

  5. #5
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    Mercyh, thanks for the info.

    I am having trouble understanding the difference between #1 and #2.

    My belkin router can be set to get DNS automatically from the ISP. That is how I have had it configured in the past. Periodically my PC would loose the ability to browse the internet but I could ping to 8.8.8.8 I assumed that I was somehow loosing contact to DNS servers. I set the router to static DNS addresses provided by Google and was able to browse. I have since changed to Open DNS on a recommendation from Retired Geek. Everything is behaving.

    I just started wondering if assigning DNS server addresses to the NIC would be better/worse than having them set on the router.

  6. #6
    5 Star Lounger
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    #1> IPCONFIG \ALL on a workstation shows the ROUTER's ip address as the DNS server.

    #2> IPCONFIG \ALL on a workstation shows the DNS servers that are assigned on the router as the DNS servers.


    In #1 the ROUTER is actually querying the DNS servers and forwarding the result to the workstation.

    In #2 the WORKSTATION is directly querying the DNS servers and the router maintains no DNS cache at all.



    (I edited the other post as I had typed DHCP when I meant DNS in the descriptions....)


    I just started wondering if assigning DNS server addresses to the NIC would be better/worse than having them set on the router.
    There is no advantage to assigning them directly on your NIC and if you go this route you lose the simplicity of using DHCP as you would need to configure every new machine that you put on your network

  7. #7
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    The standard setting is this.
    1. The router gets all settings from the ISP.
    2. Your PC(s) get all settings from the router.
    3. Your PC requests DNS data and the router supplies it, either from cache or by querying the DNS it acquired from your ISP.

    As has been pointed out, you can set the router to use another DNS.

    cheers, Paul

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