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Thread: Defragging

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    I'm running Win XP SP3 on a Compaq desktop. It had become exceptionally slow so I did all the usual cleaning, removing unused apps and temps files, etc. Then using my Diskeeper defrag I proceeded to defrag the hard drive. About half way through the process, when viewing the progress screen, the drive looks like it has been pretty well cleaned up, but suddenly, all (or most) of the fragmented files began to reappear and at the end of the process the drive looks as fragmented at when I began. What gives? I can stop the defrag process at the point where it the drive looks pretty clean but I'm not confident it will stay that way. Help!

    Larry Brough

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    The picture shown by the defrag process is only to look nice in the GUI. The best way to tell is to look at the text report and see how many files are fragmented and how many fragments in each.

    p.s. Don't bother defragmenting, just add more RAM.

    cheers, Paul

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    New Lounger
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    At the end of the defrag, when all the fragmented files reappear, the report says I have 577 fragmented files. If I stop the process when it looks pretty clean, it says I have 51 fragmented files. The computer does seem to run faster with only 51 fragmented files. I have defragged computers for years and have never experienced a situation in which they files are unfragged then refragged during the processing.

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Files "in use" will not be defragmented and I wouldn't be concerned about it.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Larry, how much free hard drive space does Windows report you have now?
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

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    Just for the heck of it I re-defragged the hard drive this morning. Before starting, Diskeeper said I had 455 fragmented files. After allowing the process to complete I had 576 fragmented files. So I defragged it again several times, stopping each time when the display suggested the drive was pretty clean and the number of fragmented files decreased to 299, then 154, then 47 and finally down to 9 fragmented files. Each time the report showed 55% free space on the 60 GB drive. But I am confident that if I allowed the defragging to complete, the number of fragmented files would increase back up to 400-500 as before. Strange.

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Try using another defragmenter, like Vopt, JkDefrag, or Defraggler, and see if this behavior persists.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

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    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    If you use Defraggler and want to see the files each colored block contains, just click on one of the blocks to show its contents.

    Defraggler will not defrag System Volume Information files and Windows protected system files. When it is finished, it will report a greater percentage of fragmented files left than will Windows Disk Defragmenter or Auslogics, and probably several others. According to Piriform forums, that is because the other defrag tools exclude the files that are untouched in their report, while Defraggler includes them.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

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    Since you are using Diskeeper, try running a complete boot time defrag to get the rest of the fragmented files. Then, to keep it that way, turn on automatic defrag

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I use Auslogics Disk Defragmentor with great success.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

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    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Try running Chkdsk on the drive before a defrag.

    Jerry

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    I believe I found the problem. I installed Defraggler and it identified all the fragmented files (pretty neat) the largest was a file called gobackio.bin. At first I was clueless but then remembered that years ago I had Norton System Utilities installed on the computer and GoBack was a part of that. Apparently when I uninstalled NU GoBack was left behind and it could not be defragged. I found the offending file using SearchEverything, renamed it gobackio.txt and simply deleted it. It freed up 5 GB of RAM in the process and now the drive has no fragmentation. Thanks for all the help.

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    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Just for the record, I tried the "Defraggler" program just once and it totally corrupted my HD.
    So that one is on my "Never Again" list.

    Years ago, I developed my own method of defragmenting my HD. In a nutshell, I do a Ghost backup
    of my C drive to an Image File which is saved to a second HD. Then after I check the file for its integrity,
    I do an immediate Restore of that file back to C.
    The result is a C drive completely re-written, with no spaces between files and of course, NO fragmentation.
    Then my C drive looks like this:


    In the above picture, I only used the Windows Defrag program to display how the drive looks after my backup & restore procedure.
    This is Windows XP-Pro-SP3 on a FAT-32 formatted hard drive.

    Doing this does require some preparations, but it's well worth the effort.
    The Windows Defrag program does work very well without corrupting the HD, but my method only takes about 8 minutes and is a lot better.

    Cheers Mates!
    The Doctor

    PS: I've been at this stuff for about 30 years now. I ran a mainframe computer years ago and we basically
    defragmented our big hard drives the same way. (backup & restore)
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

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    The downside to a disk with no spare space is as soon as you re-write a file you have to move right to the end of the used space to write, then you leave a hole where the old file was - Windows generally uses transactional writes which create a new file, delete the old, then rename. You need free space between your files to reduce the fragmentation distance and therefore head movement times.

    cheers, Paul

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    Is it really worth it?
    How much processor time do you gain with defragging?
    How much risk do you take moving files around on your system drive?
    IS there a better way todo it - as was suggested - add RAM?

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