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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    I want to put the "Address" toolbar and a "Links" tool bar at the top of my screen. I use both a lot and I do not want them taking up real estate on my taskbar. How do I get them OFF my taskbar and up to the top of my screen where I need them to be? If there is no ability to drag them off the taskbar, is there some tweak somewhere in Windows 7 innards that I can do to get them off the taskbar? Has anyone developed a little app to do this?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    As I recall, the toolbars must stay with the Taskbar. To move the toolbars, you would have to move the Taskbar to a new location. I am not aware of any hacks to do what you describe. Perhaps another Lounger knows of one.
    Deadeye81

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  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    That is correct Gerald. I read that MS got more customer and tech service issues with people accidentally moving toolbars and such off the taskbar and decided to remove this capability from Win 7, you know an OS for the masses. I have not read of any tweaks to change this to date.
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  4. #4
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    Something in a gadget maybe but having a lookiloo around Google yeilded very little on the subject. I take it you were accustomed to that feature in XP? I have the occasional use for an off-taskbar toolbar as well (network computers list) so those machines all run XP.

    You can squeeze a toolbar on the taskbar down to a very small size by using a very short title and pushing them all the way over next to the tray so all that is seen is the short title and a droplist arrow which reveals the contents when activated. Also can pull up the taskbar an extra notch to allow for more room. If that's already been done and its not enough or still unacceptable; I'm back to XP, for now.

  5. #5
    3 Star Lounger
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    Byron, thank you for your thoughts on this. Yes, I used the off-taskbar toolbars quite a lot in XP and they are set to disappear when not needed while the taskbar is set to be always visible.. Having the Links toolbar at the top was a godsend-- made it possible for me to help a lot of people in a Yahoo group who needed links and needed answers in a hurry when I was also trying to do paying work and had multiple windows of all sizes open all over the place. I like being able to almost always have all my buttons on taskbar visible rather than some being forced to hide because there was no room for them. I will try your suggestions though. It's funny - I guess these all seem like small things, yet, to me they were huge and were things I often stopped to realize, once again, how lucky I was that they were available and made my work style possible.

    I am still using XP on my old computer as I try to learn Windows 7, and make it work for me (right now it doesn't want to let me into my own stuff even though I am logged in as Administrator). I waited for Windows 7 and really thought it was going to be the answer to needing to move forward with Windows while also having the functionality I needed. I am wondering, now, if I should have waited for Windows 8.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Kelliann, the time invested in learning Windows 7 should make future releases of Windows an easier and much more pleasurable experience, as long as Microsoft remembers the lessons it learned from Vista.

    In my opinion, Windows 8 will probably not be a radical departure from what we have seen in Windows 7, but hopefully a more refined OS than has been Windows 7. As long as each succeeding generation of Windows is an improvement over the previous one, we should not see another Microsoft OS that will be as long lived as has XP. Part of XP's appeal is the fact that it has been a part of PC culture for so many years in which we have seen marked improvement in the OS with each successive service pack, especially with Service Pack 2.

    Give Windows 7 some time, learn how you can take advantage of the strengths of the OS, and most likely you will see the areas where it is superior to XP. I have been of the persuasion that XP was the best OS to ever come out of Microsoft. I now believe Windows 7 has taken that crown.

    One of the differences between XP and Windows 7 is in the use of the Administrator account. In XP, when you are set up as an Administrator, you enjoy full administrator privileges, but this means that any malware that gets in your computer will also have full administrative privileges. When you set yourself up in Windows 7 with an administrator user account, you are part of an administrator group, and possess limited administrator privileges. This is in place to make your Windows installation more secure. However, the full Administrator account in Windows 7 is hidden. In order to access some of your own stuff in Windows 7, you must right click on some programs and select Run as administrator. This empowers you with elevated privileges above the normal administrator group privileges (such as you are use to in XP).

    There are also certain folders you will see in Windows Explorer that you would think are your stuff, when in fact they are protected by the operating system, and are never meant to be accessed by users. Keep watching the forums, particularly the Windows 7 forum and you will see more on this subject.
    Deadeye81

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  7. #7
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I used XP for many years, both at home and at work. I was very comfortable and accustomed to how it worked. It took a relatively short period of time before I drew the conclusion that "I LOVE WIN 7". It is so far superior to XP that I can state in my opinion MS hit a home run with Win 7.

    For some help with learning Win 7 check out these links:

    How To Geek


    Windows Seven Forums


    Paul Thorrott's Windows 7 Supersite


    These sites will teach you how to use, tweak and customize your Win 7 OS. Enjoy them, spend time with them.
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  8. #8
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    Give Windows 7 some time, learn how you can take advantage of the strengths of the OS, and most likely you will see the areas where it is superior to XP. I have been of the persuasion that XP was the best OS to ever come out of Microsoft. I now believe Windows 7 has taken that crown.
    That may be true but its in large part because MS wants to move forward and get XP behind them, and rightly so as a public owned company. Win 7 is fine and all, certainly superior in security and native UI looks, but, I think XP circa SP2 and shortly afterward is like a classic car and not just because its old enough to be a classic but because it really is a classic with features that are no less, or even more productive and easier to get at since security wasn't such an issue, or at least as addressable.

    Big finned cars with low slipstream coefficient went away for the most part, not because they weren't fantastic, but because of the need to be more gas efficient in a changing environmental awareness. I think the analogy applies to XP. I'm faster, more direct, more nimble and more intuitive with XP but if I weren't inside my nice security ring, I'd be more worried as well.

    I use several iterations of each OS every day side by side and one has a little advantage here and the other has a counter advantage there. Its neck and neck though Win 7 is much more "prickly" about access which can be viewed as both good and bad. I get more UI customization with XP and more direct task access, but the Tab naming trick in 7 is really nice when applicable and I would say that 7 is just a bit more stable than XP but not by much.

    Slowly, so slowly MS is succeeding in the non-support tactic though, but, I also have that licked as well (Win7 virtual in Unity mode ) and I plan on racing my classic up and down the boulevard for a long time to come unless 8 or some future version combines the best of both.

  9. #9
    3 Star Lounger
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    It is very very VERY interesting to me to read the opinions of all of you on 7 vs. XP.

    I am resisting the urge to chuck 7 and install XP on that computer so I can give 7 a chance. At this point, I am not seeing whatever its advantages are though I am sure that would come in time. What you all are addressing are exactly the thoughts I was having late last night which were: What ARE the advantages of 7 for *me* specifically? So far, I have not uncovered them but I recall fighting with XP when I switched from 95 (I tend to do these switches 12-18 mo. after they come out to avoid any early problems). However, the stability of XP and OE at that time totally won me over and made every bit of the fight worth it.

    These days I am pretty direct myself about making enough money to survive in this economy<g> so my only use for my computer is to use it in a way that makes best use of my time since to me, time=money and further, seconds count. And this leaves me only interested in using an OS that does not make me do any extra clicks or lengthy drags from one end of the window to the other. After watching all those "Windows 7 was MY idea" commercials, I want it to behave like it was MY idea and it is so far not doing that. I am sure a lot of it is because I don't know how to work it but on things essential to my work style, I am coming here and asking how to do them.

    Ted, I have looked at all 3 of those sites over the past couple of days and will continue to do so. Since I wondered if they were the best ones out there to be looking at, I was very happy to see that you recommend them. Thank you for that.

  10. #10
    3 Star Lounger
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    Gerald, thank you for this explanation -
    >One of the differences between XP and Windows 7 is in the use of the Administrator account. In XP, when you are set up as an Administrator, you enjoy full administrator privileges, but this means that any malware that gets in your computer will also have full administrative privileges. When you set yourself up in Windows 7 with an administrator user account, you are part of an administrator group, and possess limited administrator privileges. This is in place to make your Windows installation more secure. However, the full Administrator account in Windows 7 is hidden. In order to access some of your own stuff in Windows 7, you must right click on some programs and select Run as administrator. This empowers you with elevated privileges above the normal administrator group privileges (such as you are use to in XP).

    >There are also certain folders you will see in Windows Explorer that you would think are your stuff, when in fact they are protected by the operating system, and are never meant to be accessed by users. Keep watching the forums, particularly the Windows 7 forum and you will see more on this subject.

    Nobody else uses my computer or even comes near it. So, what I want to do is find a single place that will unlock all my folders. Last night I navigated to my user name in explorer and found that as I went down the folder list many were locked, so I clicked properties and saw that it said "Everyone" was denied access and I had to change to "allowed." I figured that this was probably to keep malware out.

    How do I become the administrator at the top of the heap so I am not denied access anywhere. I know I have to stay out of operating system folders, and I can set views to hide them.

    Thank you very much for continuing to help me with these issues.

  11. #11
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    [quote name='Kelliann OToole'

    "Nobody else uses my computer or even comes near it. So, what I want to do is find a single place that will unlock all my folders. Last night I navigated to my user name in explorer and found that as I went down the folder list many were locked, so I clicked properties and saw that it said "Everyone" was denied access and I had to change to "allowed." I figured that this was probably to keep malware out."

    Can you provide the folder/file names you changed permissions to "Everyone allowed". Please do not edit or access these files. Folders and files that deny "Everyone" permissions to any access do so for some very good reasons. Tinkering with such files, and there are some in your "User" folder, can wreck your Windows installation.
    Deadeye81

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  12. #12
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Kelliann,

    If you are able to see the following highlighted folders in the Windows Explorer right hand pane when you click on your "user name" in the left pane, then these are junction points that enable older XP applications to find the proper folders to look for and save files in Windows 7. They should never be deleted or altered in any way:



    If you do see these on your computer, then you should click Organize on your toolbar at the top of Explorer and select Folder and search options, click the View tab, and select Don't show hidden files, folders, or drives under Hidden files and folders.

    Next place a check mark in the block beside Hide protected operating system files (Recommended). These steps will prevent accidents from crippling your Windows installation.

    If you have changed the permissions to Everyone allowed access to these folders, return permissions to Everyone denied access.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  13. #13
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Darn, Gerald, I was just now typing an answer to his last post. When I clicked on reply, there is another reply from you. You are too quick for me again today! I also think he might be talking about the Access Denied junction points. Good advice to hide these for someone who may try to change something with them. Kelliann, follow Gerald's advice here or you might find yourself reinstalling.

    Have you created a system Image so that if you do something wrong you can quickly restore with your Image. Look at many of the threads discussing Imaging to learn about this fantastic method to restore Win 7.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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  14. #14
    5 Star Lounger
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    I compromise my security (make it more like XP) in Win 7 all the time. Like Kelliann, no one else uses the computer and it never leaves the protected ring of off-board security. It would not be advisable to do so otherwise. It does illustrate that point well that security is diametrically opposed to ease of use, access, and speed and efficency...that's its job in case its a bad buggy on the other end instead. I think Win 7 does a pretty good job of balancing the two but it can still be quite irritating when it denies some action to a legitimate user.

  15. #15
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    Gerald,
    First, my apologies for not responding sooner. I had to stop spending hours and hours with Windows 7 and return to working and doing other stuff <g>.

    Second, thanks for explaining that! I see that there are shortcut arrows next to each of the ones you highlighted and you answered the question I didn't ask about why are there two "my documents" folders in there.

    Is there a way for me to, say, change what's on the Windows 7 send-to menu, or manually delete individual cookies?

    If I am running an older program that only works with XP will I be able to customize its send-to menu if I want?

    -- Ted, no, I have not created a system image but will do a search for those threads.

    -- Byron - I definitely agree with you on "irritating." They definitely didn't ask ME about what I wanted in Windows 7 - I would have said more options to do what *I* want with it instead of what MS wants with it.

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