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  1. #1
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    Hi,

    I have Office 2007 and am able to downlooad it on two additional computers; I will be getting a 64-bit computer with Windows 7 this week, and they are offering me Office 2010 at a discount rate. Is there a significant improvement in Office 2010 over Office 2007 that, thinking long term, it would be to my advantage to get Office 2010?

    Thank you for any guidance you can give me;.

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Some improvements have been made with the User Interface on 2010. It is much more customizable. The licensing is somewhat different in 2010. Check this web page from MS for information
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  3. #3
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    Thanks Ted. I think that I will give it a shot. Have a great day.l

    moon1130

  4. #4
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    Even though you will have a 64-bit Windows 7 OS you should most likely install the 32-bit version of Office 2010. Very few Office add-ins/extensions have been upgraded to 64-bit. See 64-bit editions of Office 2010 for a discussion.

    Also, you can only have 32-bit Office or 64-bit Office running on a system not both. So, if you decide to switch from 32-bit to 64-bit Office or vice versa you must completely uninstall Office and reinstall from scratch.

    Joe
    Joe

  5. #5
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    Joe I wish to install office 2010 on myn 64bit PC. I understand I must remove Office 2007 even though I have the 64 bit version. What happens to my data stored in Word 2070?

  6. #6
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    If you are saying that you have a 64-bit version of Windows then you cqan install either the 32-bit version of Office 2010 or the 64-bit version of Office 2010. You CAN have both Office 2007 & Office 2010 installed at the same time if you care to as long as they are both either 32-bit or 64-bit. You should be given the opportunity to keep or remove Office 2007 when you install Office 2010.

    Unless you have a specific reason to require the 64-bit version of Office 2010, such as a spreadsheet larger than 2GB, you should install the 32-bit version. Most of the Office extensions have not been upgraded to 64-bit.

    Joe
    Joe

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP View Post
    If you are saying that you have a 64-bit version of Windows then you cqan install either the 32-bit version of Office 2010 or the 64-bit version of Office 2010. You CAN have both Office 2007 & Office 2010 installed at the same time if you care to as long as they are both either 32-bit or 64-bit.

    Joe
    Pardon my butting in, since it isn't relevant to the thread as presented but it may matter a lot to me, but does this mean that I can have both Outlook 2007 and 2010 installed simultaneously? I was under the impression that two Outlooks were strictly taboo.

    To come to think of it, I guess it is relevant to the thread as presented.

    While I'm at it (and this is also of interest to me), I don't think the original question has yet been answered: what becomes of the user's data? I guess I'm thinking of upgrades rather then new machines in this case, but if you have 2007 can you simply overwrite it or add to it with a parallel 2010 and have the data fall into place? When you make a change, do both versions recognize it, to the extent of their respective visions (2010 has features not recognized in 2007)?

    As for Office 2007 versus 2010 it depends on whether or not it is for critical or commercial use, or for a home-user. If your data is critical or sensitive or what-have-you and is in constant use, then stick with what you are using until all are agreed (if ever) that 2010 is better. Even without that, be sure all of your data is backed up to the latest you have, and is retained in archival form (e.g. DVDs), before you change in case you have to go back.

    Personally I have Office 2010 both 64-bit and 32-bit on different computers, and I am just plain having fun with it. The 64-bit doesn't bother me any (and I believe Joe admitted to having it, unless that was just Win 7), and you may be a bit ahead of the curve by having it. It is, after all, very recent, and while we may be among the guinea pigs (as home users always are) I do know that a lot of work was done in coming up with it, and it is certainly the direction things are headed. The earlier you get in the more you can learn and the less hassle you will have when everyone but you has 64-bit. It's the start of a school year, I'll bet there will be a very large user base for Office 2010 64-bit, and if the providers have any business sense the Office extensions will be upgraded to suit the market.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Peter,

    and have the data fall into place?
    Generally, yes. That is as long as you store all your documents for all the office programs in Documents (My Documents).
    If you have moved them around and changed the defaults for each of the programs {a recommended procedure}, Word, Excel, etc. you will have to reset the default save locations in the options menu of each program.

    I was under the impression that two Outlooks were strictly taboo
    This is also correct, you can have multiple versions of all the other programs, if installed correctly, {see other posts on this topic} but not Outlook! As for your data, unless you have moved it {as I have} the new version of Outlook will automatically find it. As a matter of fact, if memory serves, if you do an upgrade install it will even find the Outlook .pst file even if you have moved it. The only way I'm aware that you can have two versions of Outlook installed is via dual boot, one on each OS. I used to do this with XP/7 until I decided that 7 was OK and killed the XP install. I had this setup so that both OS/Outlooks used the same .pst file.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterg View Post
    Pardon my butting in, since it isn't relevant to the thread as presented but it may matter a lot to me, but does this mean that I can have both Outlook 2007 and 2010 installed simultaneously? I was under the impression that two Outlooks were strictly taboo.

    To come to think of it, I guess it is relevant to the thread as presented.

    While I'm at it (and this is also of interest to me), I don't think the original question has yet been answered: what becomes of the user's data? I guess I'm thinking of upgrades rather then new machines in this case, but if you have 2007 can you simply overwrite it or add to it with a parallel 2010 and have the data fall into place? When you make a change, do both versions recognize it, to the extent of their respective visions (2010 has features not recognized in 2007)?

    As for Office 2007 versus 2010 it depends on whether or not it is for critical or commercial use, or for a home-user. If your data is critical or sensitive or what-have-you and is in constant use, then stick with what you are using until all are agreed (if ever) that 2010 is better. Even without that, be sure all of your data is backed up to the latest you have, and is retained in archival form (e.g. DVDs), before you change in case you have to go back.

    Personally I have Office 2010 both 64-bit and 32-bit on different computers, and I am just plain having fun with it. The 64-bit doesn't bother me any (and I believe Joe admitted to having it, unless that was just Win 7), and you may be a bit ahead of the curve by having it. It is, after all, very recent, and while we may be among the guinea pigs (as home users always are) I do know that a lot of work was done in coming up with it, and it is certainly the direction things are headed. The earlier you get in the more you can learn and the less hassle you will have when everyone but you has 64-bit. It's the start of a school year, I'll bet there will be a very large user base for Office 2010 64-bit, and if the providers have any business sense the Office extensions will be upgraded to suit the market.
    You can only have one version of Outook installed at a time. I neglected to state that.

    User data should be just fine when you install Outlook 2010. I've upgraded Office on several PCs and not had a problem with any user data. When you choose to remove your existing Office install as part of an upgrade, the current version is uninstalled, and the new version is installed in its own folders.

    I did have 64-bit Office installed for a while. But I uninstalled it and installed 32-bit Office. I found a couple of addins that I used that were only still 32-bit.

    Joe
    Joe

  10. #10
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I agree that uninstalling 2007 then installing 2010 keeps all data intact. At least it did for me. I have moved my data to a "D" data partition prior to my 2010 installation and when installed, 2010 knew where to look for my data. I do not use Outlook so must defer to JoeP learned knowledge on this matter.

    I decided to go with the 32 Bit version since I have no need (large Excel worksheets) of the 64 Bit version.
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  11. #11
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    Thank you for the feedback gentlemen - I appreciated that.

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