Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 30
  1. #1
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    27
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Is there a program I can purchase that will retrieve information on a USB drive where an idiot (that would be me) unplugged the drive too quickly?

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger RussB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Michigan
    Posts
    803
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 50 Times in 49 Posts
    There are several and I am sure that Google will help with this. I have had partial success with Recuva.
    None are perfect, however there are things you can do to prevent this in the future, or at least minimize the chance. You can turn off the Write Cache to USB drives. Also this is a good reminder to us all that anything we put on a USB drive, should not be the "only" copy available.
    Do you "Believe"? Do you vote? Please Read:
    LEARN something today so you can TEACH something tomorrow.
    DETAIL in your question promotes DETAIL in my answer.
    Dominus Vobiscum <))>(

  3. #3
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    27
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Unfortunately, it appears from my use, Recuva only recovers damaged files. I am trying to recover the entire drive.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    California & Arizona
    Posts
    6,121
    Thanks
    160
    Thanked 609 Times in 557 Posts
    If you are able to run a checkdisk on the drive from a boot environment, I would suggest running checkdisk with the "R" switch as a first step. The drive would have to be at least recognized from the boot environment.

    Other potential sites with solutions:
    Storage: Oops, I accidentally unplugged my USB hard drive, now I can't access it.
    Google: unable to access usb drive+pulled drive
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Cardiff, UK
    Posts
    4,484
    Thanks
    283
    Thanked 572 Times in 476 Posts
    I usually have to resort to Testdisk (free) or RecoverMyFiles ($$) in your scenario; most freeware programs are not much more than 'undeleters' in my experience. Treat the drive as if it has been formatted.

  6. #6
    5 Star Lounger petesmst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    789
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 43 Times in 33 Posts
    If you are VERY quick off the mark, you can download "wGXe Data Recovery Professional" FREE, provided you do so TODAY (03 Sep 10) at the following web page:

    http://www.giveawayoftheday.com/

    Notes to the program state:

    "wGXe Data Recovery Professional is an advanced data recovery tool, which can recover lost data of all types, including Word, Excel, Access, Power Point, audio , etc. Data can easily be recovered from NTFS, FAT file systems"
    (My Setup: Custom built: 3,70GHz Intel Core i7-4820K CPU; MSI Military Class iii X79A-GD45 Plus Motherboard; Win 10 Pro (64 bit) - (UEFI-booted); 16GB RAM; 512GB SAMSUNG SD850 PRO SSD; 120GB SAMSUNG 840 SSD; Seagate 2TB Barracuda SATA6G HDD; GeForceGTX 980 4GB Graphics Card; Office 2013 Prof (32-bit); MS Project 2013 (32-bit); Acronis TI 2015 Premium, NIS 2016, VMWare Workstation12 Pro, etc). WD My Book 3 1TB USB External Backup Drive). Samsung 24" Curved HD Monitor.

  7. #7
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    27
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    CHKDSK worked. I did not know the correct syntax at first. But discovered it is CHKDSK /r p: where p: is the affected drive.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    California & Arizona
    Posts
    6,121
    Thanks
    160
    Thanked 609 Times in 557 Posts
    Great
    Sometimes checkdisk can recover from hard drive corruption related to power failures.
    Pulling the cord from an external USB drive can be tantamount to this, if the right conditions exist.
    It is also possible that the drive was being written to by some process of the operating system, or a software
    backup program that come as part of the drive at the moment it was pulled, thereby corrupting data.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  9. #9
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hinsdale, IL, USA
    Posts
    2,482
    Thanks
    176
    Thanked 152 Times in 129 Posts
    Not to be a Pollyanna about this, but here is an example of why you need to use the "Safely Remove" feature in Windows before removing external devices. Luckily, your only damage was to your file system on the device. I have seen SD Camera Cards and Flash Drives literally fried by yanking then out without first doing the "safely remove" routine.
    -- Bob Primak --

  10. #10
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Primak View Post
    Not to be a Pollyanna about this, but here is an example of why you need to use the "Safely Remove" feature in Windows before removing external devices. Luckily, your only damage was to your file system on the device. I have seen SD Camera Cards and Flash Drives literally fried by yanking then out without first doing the "safely remove" routine.
    There is another way - if you plug in your USB drive, then go to Control Panel/Device manager and locate the USB device in the Disk Drives section. Now double click, or right click/Properties, select the Policies tab you can choose to have the drive able to be removed safely without having to do a "safely remove". There is a slight performance hit in that it disables write caching for the drive, but this is not usually significant. It's still a bad idea to pull the drive while the writing is actually happening, but when things have quieted down you can pull it safely without having to use the safely remove. It is device specific however, you need to do it for each specific USB drive, but where you have an important drive it does give some belt and braces protection.

    Justin

  11. #11
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Space Coast Florida
    Posts
    19
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Primak View Post
    Not to be a Pollyanna about this, but here is an example of why you need to use the "Safely Remove" feature in Windows before removing external devices.

    I am pretty good about remembering to use the "safely remove" feature when working with USB drives. Fortunately, my several "Oooops" have never cost me any data loss or other problems.

    One problem I do run into though is frequent error messages saying the device cannot be stopped, close software using it and try again. I check and nothing in the systray (notification area) or taskbar should be using it. Hmmmmm. And yes, I check the hidden icons also. I close literally everything there and try again. Error message again. *&@%%#$ The only way to safely remove the device is to turn off the computer to force closure of whatever hidden software is using the device, remove it and then turn it back on to continue. Just rebooting sometimes restarts the software that is using the device so shutdown is the only reliable way to do it.

    Is there any way to identify exactly what is using the device so I can close it or better yet disable it or uninstall it?

    Thanks,
    Don

  12. #12
    2 Star Lounger bmeacham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Austin, Texas, USA
    Posts
    191
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Wilcox View Post
    The only way to safely remove the device is to turn off the computer to force closure of whatever hidden software is using the device, remove it and then turn it back on to continue. Just rebooting sometimes restarts the software that is using the device so shutdown is the only reliable way to do it.

    Thanks,
    Don
    Try logging off (not shutdown). While logged off, remove the USB device. Then log on again. That is faster than rebooting.
    Bill Meacham
    bmeacham98 AT yahoo.com

  13. #13
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Fort Wayne IN USA
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    To remove a USB drive that Windows will no 'let go of,' install Unlocker: http://ccollomb.free.fr/unlocker/

    Once installed, open "My computer" ("Computer in Vista and 7) and right click the USB drive. Choose Unlocker.

    When Unlocker opens, click "Unlock All." Now the "Safely Remove" utility will work.
    Neurons that fire together, wire together.
    Posted with Opera

  14. #14
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Perhaps "slightly" off topic, but I had recent occasion to copy a file from one machine to another, so I inserted my flash drive and copied the file. Since I've had previous data loss I'm a stickler for using "safely remove...", however, in this case it wasn't available. So I waited several minutes before removing the drive. When I inserted it into the other computer - nothing - the drive wasn't seen at all, not even in the disk manager. Knowing the drive just worked in the other machine I took it back and plugged it in, and immediately the activity light on the drive started blinking. Once it stopped there was still no option for safe removal, but upon removing it and putting it in the target machine, it was recognized correctly and all files were there.

    One other thing I've seen is that Windows doesn't like assigning a drive letter higher than G to usb drives. Whether this is normal behavior or something peculiar to the system image that I use for corporate computers I can't say, but opening the disk manager will show the drive without a letter assignment, which must be added manually in order for it to function.

  15. #15
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Space Coast Florida
    Posts
    19
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by bmeacham View Post
    Try logging off (not shutdown). While logged off, remove the USB device. Then log on again. That is faster than rebooting.
    Thanks. Had not thought of that. Will try it next time. I suspect this may have the same problem as rebooting has sometimes though.

    Don

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •