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  1. #1
    Lounger
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    (I spooled this thread off the 'Disconnected USB device before "safely" removed' thread)

    I have a USB drive that is completely accessible (except for some garbage files that cannot be read), but... it is now read-only. All attempts to delete/rename/modify/format all return with results similar to the following error I get when I try to run a CHKDSK /r:

    "Windows cannot run disk checking on this volume because it is write protected."

    There is no write-protect switch on this drive, and the drive persists as being a read-only device no matter what machine I plug it into (even a linux box).

    Is the drive officially "toast"?

    Thanks,

    Daniel

  2. #2
    Super Moderator satrow's Avatar
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    Hi Daniel,

    Does Device Manager give the drive the same name as it did originally or, does Googling the current DevMan name only return drives with the same problem?

    If so, toasted I think. The 'chipset has lost contact with the flash memory' is how I'd describe it.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    There are a few things to try, make sure you have a backup of all the data on the drive first.
    1 Disable write caching on the drive.
    2 Attempt to remount drive.
    3 DriveCleanup - remove nonpresent drives from the registry.

    Drive Tools for Windows
    ReMount - change drive letters

    Using ReMount you can quickly change a drive letter without clicking thru the Windows disk management. E.g. to change drive F: to U:
    remount f: u:

    If both letters are in use and shall be swapped then use parameter -s
    remount f: u: -s

    For nonsense operations, as remonting the Windows system drive or mounting a local drive to a letter used by a network drive, use parameter -f (force).
    remount c: x: -f

    Instead of drive letters you can use NTFS mount points too.
    Admin privileges are required.
    Download: remount.zip

    Last update: 23 July 2009
    Make certain that your syntax is correct.
    DriveCleanup removes all currently non present "Storage Volumes", "Disk", "CDROM", "Floppy" USB drives and their USB devices from the device tree. Furthermore it removes orphaned registry items related to these device types.
    Started with parameter -T (like test) it shows which devices it would remove.

    DriveCleanup -T

    Started without a parameter, it does its job without further inquiry.
    To remove certain types of devices there are the parameters -U -D -C -F -V and -R.
    Sample to remove abandoned registry entries only:

    drivecleanup -R

    Under x64 editions of Windows only the included x64 works correctly.

    Admin privileges required.

    Download V0.7:
    drivecleanup.zip

    Download V0.4 (without registry cleaning):
    drivecleanup04.zip
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
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  4. #4
    Lounger
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    Thank you, gents, for your replies.

    Andy, the device currently reports as a "Generic Flash Disk USB Device", and I'm not sure if this is how it reported prior to the problems. Looking at the Device Manager, Device Properties, I see this in the "Bus Relations" (the only field that seems to possibly hold something unique to the drive): "USBSTOR\Disk&Ven_Generic&Prod_Flash_Disk&Rev_8.00 \77DFC903&0". I compared this to a SanDisk I have, which reports the in the same field: "USBSTOR\Disk&Ven_SanDisk&Prod_U3_Cruzer_Micro&Rev _8.02\17389013A191D944&0"

    Clint, thanks for pointing me to the useful tools (a minor note I'd leave with the writer, though, is to either honour the /? parameter, or don't actually do anything unless all parameters are valid. I wanted to see what were the instructions for use using /?, and cleared out all of my local settings). I disabled all of my write caches (did this for a couple of other machines too, where getting solid saves are critical), remounted, did the clean-up, unmounted and cleaned up again (if the drive it mounted, it won't clean the settings for that drive), then remounted, same problem.

    I think I'm going to go with Andy's "worst case" diagnosis -- Toast

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