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    I have a persistent problem with a hard (500 GB SATA) drive. Something triggers a drive scan every time I start the computer. This is not a five-stage standard scan but a fairly brief 3-stage scan that I suspect must reflect a software problem that starts it rather than a drive problem. I have performed full scans and surface scans without success at eliminating the scan that starts with every boot. I doubt that the drive itself is going as it works perfectly once the short scan is over. Any suggestions?


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    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Hi peterg,

    Does the scan report as having corrected something when it is finished?

    Have you checked the Event Viewer Application log to see if it contains errors that have occurred during your Windows session before powering off? Maybe there is a clue there that might narrow the possibilities down.

    Could it be that some software has placed a scan scheduled for startup in Task Scheduler?
    Deadeye81

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Shepard View Post
    Hi peterg,

    Does the scan report as having corrected something when it is finished?

    Have you checked the Event Viewer Application log to see if it contains errors that have occurred during your Windows session before powering off? Maybe there is a clue there that might narrow the possibilities down.

    Could it be that some software has placed a scan scheduled for startup in Task Scheduler?
    To answer the last question first, System Mechanic was installed and it is one program that often reports drive errors and the need for (and scheduling of) a scan, and while it always asks permission for such changes it was a suspected source of a residual command for one.

    Subsequent to the post I had a blue screen and piles of error reports that I confess I don't know how to read. I also received a message that System Mechanic had expired, and I have since uninstalled it and cleaned up the registry with jv16 (which I must admit is a fine utility these days, for the benefit of those who have old copies they haven't updated or looked at for some time - I think updates are all free, and 64-bit is covered).

    At the moment, I'm backing it up while I can, as it appears to be working.

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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Try running a checkdisk with either the f or r switch enabled, preferably the r switch, it's far more thorough.
    Do this, referably from a boot disk and not initiated from within the os on next boot.
    Clear out your event viewer and then check back periodically to see what errors are then generated.
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    5 Star Lounger chowur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterg View Post
    I have a persistent problem with a hard (500 GB SATA) drive. Something triggers a drive scan every time I start the computer. This is not a five-stage standard scan but a fairly brief 3-stage scan that I suspect must reflect a software problem that starts it rather than a drive problem.
    Have you done a clean reboot?You didn't mention what operating system you are running.
    XP
    Windows 7
    Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them. -Albert Einsten

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Rossmere View Post
    Try running a checkdisk with either the f or r switch enabled, preferably the r switch, it's far more thorough.
    Do this, preferably from a boot disk and not initiated from within the os on next boot.
    I had done a repair install prior to posting, but the chkdsk /f or /r from that source is an excellent suggestion.
    The problem is that while booting from the disk I have the option of getting the command line, but while I am
    accustomed to the drive letter having been changed I can't seem to figure out how to get the root (or at least
    the point from which to issue the command. I reached X (presumably = C) and appeared to be in Windows\System 32,
    but confusion reigns supreme.

    For the benefit of all, the system is Windows 7 Ultimate (my apology for not having specified it), and there are three
    partitions on a single drive. I have rebooted and things run smoothly, but the scan repeats and does appear to be
    making corrections.

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    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    You may have a Dirty Volume. Try the fix detailed here:
    Check Disk runs every time you Boot

    Jerry

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Witalka View Post
    You may have a Dirty Volume. Try the fix detailed here:
    Check Disk runs every time you Boot

    Jerry
    That sounds perfect, since I committed most if not all of the crimes in the list, especially with a computer-powered USB external hard drive that I pulled the plug on before the machine OK'd it and the screen gave me a nasty message, and an internal removable drive, and using the Power Button to shut down when the monitor was blank and I couldn't think of the proper way to do it, and heaven knows what else. I have cured most of the problems and most of the bad behaviour (on my part), but this is going to take more fussing than I have time for today. I did try several times without success, but it sure looks like the problem. Thank you very much for the links.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    You're welcome. Glad I could help.

    Jerry

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Rossmere View Post
    Try running a checkdisk with either the f or r switch enabled, preferably the r switch, it's far more thorough.
    Do this, referably from a boot disk and not initiated from within the os on next boot.
    Clear out your event viewer and then check back periodically to see what errors are then generated.
    You might be interested in downloading Seatools, which are two free utilities from Seagate, SeaTools for Windows and SeaTools for DOS. These work with all drives, not just Seagate, and you may find them more informative than Windows command line utilities.


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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    You could move all the data off the drive and reformat it, I'm assuming it is NTFS to begin with.
    When that is done, boot and then go into explorer and remove the indexing checkbox if present or
    any other hook that might have it grimy hands on the drive, like system restore et al programs.

    As others have suggested, use the "Safely Remove Hardware" option when unpluging the drive.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
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