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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    I hoping to start this thread for computer users like me who are not advanced users. My hope is that Windows Secrets Lounge members will contribute here with a clear set of suggestions for new computer setup & backup.

    For example:
    Delete software that comes with a computer that is not used by the owner, use CC Cleaner, use Windows back up, Acronis, Macrium, or whatever, but in steps that anyone should be able to follow.

    In other words, HELP!

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAndrews View Post
    I hoping to start this thread for computer users like me who are not advanced users. My hope is that Windows Secrets Lounge members will contribute here with a clear set of suggestions for new computer setup & backup.

    For example:
    Delete software that comes with a computer that is not used by the owner, use CC Cleaner, use Windows back up, Acronis, Macrium, or whatever, but in steps that anyone should be able to follow.

    In other words, HELP!
    This is my method on a new install. I have used it this year on 7 different PCs with great success. I would use PC Decrapifier (that's really the name) to get rid of most of the manufacturers junkware, then use Revo Uninstaller to uninstall the rest of the junk you do not need. At this point I would install all those apps I deemed necessary for my use, and ensure that all apps are up to date. This would include all Security Apps that I commonly use. I use MSE for my AV/AM needs, and use Spybot Search and Destroy and MalwareBytes for intermittent scanning. Then I use CCleaner to clean everything up, then use Auslogics Disk Defragmenter to defragment the HD. Then make an Image of the clean and agile OS set up the way you want it. I do this on all my new PC's. For recommendations on Imaging software check the many threads in Security and Backups. mercyh and I have actually added tutorials for 2 of the more well thought of Imaging apps.

    This is your PC, and it should be set up the way you want it, not the way the manufacture wants it. Good luck!!!

    Ted
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    Ted is there a program that you use to remove unwanted partitions? I have a C:MAIN (renamed from <no name> , D: RECOVERY & a E: HP_TOOLS partition that I don't see the need for, as long as I have the factory restore CD's AND a good image of the C drive. Removing those will free up about 13GB of room on the drive.

    I think that you wrote on another post that you have your programs save their data to a different partition. So you have your OS & programs on the C drive and your data is saved on a D drive partition?

    Phil

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I dug this article up out of oblivion from the year 1999 when Windows 98 was still new.
    Thanks to Fred Langa much of the information it imparts is still relevant for today...

    The full article can be found at Informationweek.


    The Explorer: Fred's System Setup Secrets
    By Fred Langa
    InformationWeek
    August 31, 1999 12:00 AM

    Call me a slow learner. But over the years I've had to develop a series of defensive strategies to cope with the inevitable problems and hassles of hardware and software failure -- especially because I test a lot of hardware and software, and regularly make my PCs blow up. (In a figurative sense, of course.)

    I just bought a new PC -- my best guess is it's maybe the 30th machine I've used as my day-to-day personal system at work or at home. With each new machine I've used, I've tried various tricks and techniques and eventually developed a set routine that ensures that the system runs right from the start, stays rights for as long as possible, and can be made right with minimum fuss when things inevitably go awry.

    Some or all of these tips -- learned the hard way from painful experience -- may help you. Yes, a few of them may be overkill for normal users who don't abuse their PCs the way I do, but others are universal and can help anyone.

    In any case, here are the steps I take when I get a new PC or when I want to recondition an older machine. Check them out, and then join in the discussion. I'll be glad to answer whatever questions I can about the steps listed below, and then I'd also love to hear from you: What tricks or techniques do you use? What tips can you share? What steps do you take to keep your system running smoothly?

    Setting Up A New System
    1. Open the cover: You'd be amazed at what can come loose during shipping! Ensure that all cards are seated, all cables connected, all socketed chips are firmly plugged in; nothing should be loose or flopping around, except perhaps some unused power connectors, and they should be tucked out of the way of fans or other moving parts. (Use care to prevent damage to the PC components either through excessive force or static discharge.)

    2a. First boot. If the system won't boot, contact tech support. Don't waste time trying to fix a problem that shouldn't be there -- that's what your new-system warranty is for.

    2b. If it boots fine, right click on "My Computer," select properties, then the Device Manager tab. There should be no problems indicated (by yellow exclamation marks or red Xs). If there are, see 2a.

    2c. If Device Manager shows no errors, exercise the system and try everything -- ensure the sound card and speakers work, the printer prints, etc. Poke around the system and make notes of things like the BIOS settings, the network properties, and so forth but make no changes to the system setup yet. Simply ensure that everything works, and make note of any special settings. If you uncover problems, see 2a.

    3. If everything works, make a full backup of the system, even if the manufacturer has included a "Recovery CD" or similar tool. Often, those vendor kludge CDs will restore the system to a working state, but not to the same state it was in when it arrived on your door. I use PartitionMagic to safely create a large new partition on the systems' hard drive, and then use Drive Image to copy the original factory setup to the new, empty partition. (A firm believer in overkill, I'll also eventually burn that factory setup image to CD for long-term safekeeping.) But in any case, having a full backup by whatever means you choose means you can get back to your PC's factory-fresh state when you need to. 4. Install any non-original-equipment peripherals you want to use on the system. Visit the OEM's and peripheral vendors' sites; download (but don't install) updated drivers, patches, etc. Place these new drivers, patches, etc. on the new partition you created in step 3.
    See the above article title link for the full article.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

    Build your own system; get everything you want and nothing you don't.
    Latest Build:
    ASUS X99 Deluxe, Core i7-5960X, Corsair Hydro H100i, Plextor M6e 256GB M.2 SSD, Corsair DOMINATOR Platinum 32GB DDR4@2666, W8.1 64 bit,
    EVGA GTX980, Seasonic PLATINUM-1000W PSU, MountainMods U2-UFO Case, and 7 other internal drives.

  5. #5
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAndrews View Post
    Ted is there a program that you use to remove unwanted partitions? I have a C:MAIN (renamed from <no name> , D: RECOVERY & a E: HP_TOOLS partition that I don't see the need for, as long as I have the factory restore CD's AND a good image of the C drive. Removing those will free up about 13GB of room on the drive.

    I think that you wrote on another post that you have your programs save their data to a different partition. So you have your OS & programs on the C drive and your data is saved on a D drive partition?

    Phil
    I use Partition Wizard for all my partitioning needs. Yes I have moved all data to a D Drive which I call Ted's Data (pretty original huh ) The other thread does explain how to move all your data.

    I might use a more descriptive name than Main for the C Drive:

    [attachment=90052rives.png]
    Attached Images Attached Images
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  6. #6
    5 Star Lounger
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    I setup new machines with the thought of remote administration in mind. A few of steps for all machines.

    1. Uninstall any unwanted vendor programs. (I generally purchase Dell Business machines and they are pretty clean.)
    2. Reduce the C: partition to 100gb or less (depends if I am moving all the data off of this partition or not.) If the machine will be used for accounting, Microsoft Office, web and e-mail and not much else I leave the data storage alone.
    3. Create a partition to hold all the program install files and an image of my final setup of partition C:.
    4. Copy the install disks of all programs on the machine into this second partition. Create text files in each of the install folders with the install keys for the program. This allows me to login remotely and have access to the install files for any program on the machine.
    5. Install all the customer required programs, AV, etc. and run updates until everything is current.
    6. Install Logmein and connect it to my account.
    7. If this is a home user machine, install Macrium reflect free, cleanout the temp files, defrag and image the C: partition to the second partion. Copy the image to my server's customer image storage location.
    8. Move customers data to the machine.

    optional,

    9. If customer requests, setup external hard drive and setup macrium to image on schedule to the external drive. Setup .bat file to delete images after x days and x weeks.

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