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  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
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    Hi To All,

    I am trying to construct a simple logic test for numerical excel data; =IF(B2:B32=>0.70,true,bold text, ""),

    the formual is incorrect; I am trying to test such that if any of the data in the column is = or > 0.70 it should be bolded, if not, nothing is done to the data or number.

    This has to be a simple remedy....any suggestions??

    Thanks for your help.

    Marty
    Regards,
    Marty

    "Aerodynamics Is For Those Who Cannot Build Engines" - Enzo Ferrari

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Marty,

    Unless you're trying to use this formula in VBA code you can accomplish this with Conditional Formatting. {see below}.
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    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

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  3. #3
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    Excellent thanks for the pointer, can this also be accomplished by merely entering the formula for this task in a cell below the column in question?

    Thanks again...
    Marty
    Regards,
    Marty

    "Aerodynamics Is For Those Who Cannot Build Engines" - Enzo Ferrari

  4. #4
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Marty,

    Sorry but No. When using conditional formatting you must select the range {can be entire columns or rows} then select Format, Conditional Formatting from the menus. This can also be accomplished via VBA code.

    Regards
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

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  5. #5
    2 Star Lounger
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    Thanks again, VBA is my next "hobby", any recommended sites for VBA novices??

    Marty
    Regards,
    Marty

    "Aerodynamics Is For Those Who Cannot Build Engines" - Enzo Ferrari

  6. #6
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Marty,

    There are actually 3 parts to learning VBA.
    1. Learn to use the VBE (Virtual Basic Editor). Hold Ctrl & Press F11 to enter from any MS Office product.
    2. Learn the VBA Control Language. This is the same for all of MS Office and allows you to control things like loops, tests, etc.
    3. Learn the Object Model of the Office Product you want to use. Unfortunately, this is different for each of the products since obviously you wouldn't have the same objects in Word as in Excel. The Microsoft Developers Site {search on VBA} is a good place for this as well as the object browser in the VBE.

    For Excel there are several sites other than Windows Secrets:
    Mr. Excel
    Excel Hero
    Here's a Tutorial

    Several Books I can Recommend:
    See this thread

    I hope this get's you started. VBA is a great environment for supercharging MS Office products and in many cases the only way to get things you want to do done. I've been teaching myself this language for 15 years and still learning.

    Good Luck!
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

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  7. #7
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    Marty,

    RetiredGeek provided some excellent suggestions for resources. Let me add a few that I use.

    For books by the author who finally made vba make sense to me, choose any of John Walkenbach's books. For vba, "Excel 2007 Power Programming with VBA" would be my choice. It exists for 2002, 2007, and now for 2010. Walkenbach also has great books on formulas and charting. "Excel Hacks" is a treasure trove from the authors at Ozgrid. Ozgrid has an almost free newsletter ($1.00).

    Chuck Pearson at CPearson has excellent formula and vba tips. Allen Wyatt's "ExcelTips" at ExcelTips has a Tips newsletter and site in for both the Menu and Ribbon versions of Excel.

    The resources are boundless; start reading and practicing.

    To open the Visual Basic Editor (VBE), the correct keystrokes are "Alt + F11". "Ctrl + F11" will open a new Macro sheet reminiscent of old Excel.

    To start making some easy sense of some tasks you already have a good grasp of, use the Macro Recorder and then study the code in the VBE. It won't be optimized, and will be verbose, but it will get you going.

    Good luck in your adventures with vba. It can be a blast.


  8. #8
    WS Lounge VIP rory's Avatar
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    It's Chip Pearson, rather than Chuck.
    Regards,
    Rory

    Microsoft MVP - Excel

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