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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    I have no formal training in computers so excuse me if I use the wrong terms. I have, however, been using computers since the days of the Texas Instruments TI-4? and Commodore 64 and can assemble them, install operating systems and applications, and fix most problems that arise.

    I work at a small nursing home. We have about a dozen computers running Windows XP Professional. Originally they were all connected to a wired network and were all in the same workgroup. Recently we set up a server running Windows Server 2003 with the idea of setting all of the Windows XP machines to "authenticate" through the server. The fellow who set up the server showed me how to set up the workstations to connect to the "domain" being handled by the server. I have done this with all of the machines so far. We had 2 identical machines. I set up one machine and gave it the computer name "IBMCOMPUTER". It logged on successfully and worked fine. Then while the first machine was turned off (the user was out for the day) I worked on the second identical machine and was intending to have it sit around as a loaner machine if one of the other machines developed a problem. I also gave it the computer name/NETBIOS name "IBMCOMPUTER" without knowing that the names apparently should be unique. It worked fine - I guess because the other machine was off. I then unconnected the PC and stored it. The next day when the user of the first machine turned on her machine and tried to login, she couldn't succeed with her user id or the network admin account. She was able to log on to the machine via a local account. Since I hadn't touched her machine I was puzzled. Eventually after researching online I learned that I should not have given the same name to the second machine. I have since changed the name of the second machine and it logs on successfully but the first machine still cannot "authenticate" to the server.

    Is the solution some setting on the server that I need to reach to clear out or revise so that it doesn't think there are 2 identically named machines on the network, or do I have to do something to the first machine. Do I sign on to the first machine via a local account with admin privileges and delete the network accounts on the machine, change the computer name, and go through the steps again of setting it up on the network?

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger
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    If you have a local administrator account on that machine, you should be able to login as a local admin and change from domain back to workgroup. You should then be able to rename the machine while it is in workgroup and then rejoin the domain.

  3. #3
    WS Lounge VIP
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    Wow! Straight in at the deep end.

    A Windows domain requires that each computer be a "member". You do this by joining the domain as you have described. When you do this the domain controller (server 2003) and the computer agree on a password which is then used to authenticate the PC in the domain. Joining a PC with a duplicate name changes the password and the first computer is no longer authenticated.

    1. Unplug the first machine from the network, logon as a local admin and remove the PC from the domain - change to a workgroup using any name you like.
    2. Re-boot the PC and re-connect the network.
    3. Logon as local admin and re-join the domain.

    I assume the server is required to run a common program / store files? Have you got a daily backup running on the server?

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    Thanks. I suspected that I needed to rename the machine and re-join the network but hearing 2 people say that gave me the courage to do so. It was the solution I needed.

    Of interest, the machine is used to run payroll programs from ADP most of which are internet based, but one application that runs on the PC to collect employee sign ins and sign outs stopped working after the change. ADP claimed that the name change was the cause even though none of the other applications have so far shown any sensitivity to the change. At any rate that got fixed and all seems good to go.

    I look forward to using the lounge again. Many thanks.

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