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  1. #1
    Star Lounger johjue's Avatar
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    Hi, learned Loungers-

    I have a Dell Inspiron desk top purchased a little over two years ago. Original OS was Windows Vista, upgraded to Win 7 in November 2009 without incident. I've recently installed Acronis True Image Home 2011 for back up and system recovery. I've never messed around with partitions. I have downloaded and installed Easus Partition Manager 6.1.1 Professional Edition recently from GAOTD, but haven't played with it yet. My question is as follows: On the hard drive there is a D:\ Recovery partition. I expect that it contains the recovery image for the original Vista OS. If so, I can't see where this is of any use to me anymore. Hard drive is 320GB with over 200GB free, so I don't currently need the 10GB that is the size of the D partition, but am irritated at having something that may be worthless on the HD. At this point I may just leave it as is, since the computer is working fine. I would, however, enjoy any thoughts or ideas that anyone might be kind enough to offer. I'm always up for a learning experience! Attached are three screen shots that may help explain the situation.

    Thanks for any input,
    John
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    Dell Inspiron 530 Intel Pentium E2180 dual core @2.00 GHz 4GB Ram Win7 64 bit

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    5 Star Lounger
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    Does the recovery partition appear to the right side of the System parition (assuming it is C:\) in Disk Management? If so, it shouldn't be a problem, try and delete the partition, and if it goes quietly, expand C into the space that was D and you're done. You may even be able to do it with the native functions of Windows 7 (again, in Disk Management).

    If the recovery partition is to the left of the system partition, more complicated because once the partition is deleted the system partition start point has to be moved left (as it appears in Disk Management) as well as all the data. You should be able to schedule those changes in EaseUS PM and have it reboot and perform those functions in DOS mode (or is it LINUX mode?). It will take longer in this case since data must be moved as well.

    Of course before you do anything, have an image of you system as it is currently so its easy to recover if something goes wrong.

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    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Hi John, you can delete recovery partition if you have made a recovery disk for original Vista OS or you intend never going to use it again. Yet, why bother as you have ample free space.
    As to Acronis, download the user manual, as it is capable of making an image including hidden partitions.
    At present I would leave recovery partition on your PC, the when you knacker your current OS and have to re install it, you can delete it if you wish then.

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    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Hi John,

    I'll offer a slightly different perspective just to provide more options to consider. If you are using a USB external hard disk to save your image backups, why not back up the Recovery partition D: separately, and then remove it from your Dell's hard drive? You may never revert back to Vista again, but once you remove your old OS recovery option, assuming it completely restores your computer to its factory fresh Vista condition, then you have no option to ever get it back, unless you image that partition before deletion.

    I have an Acronis image backup of my Toshiba Vista partition made just prior to upgrading to Windows 7. I keep that Acronis image backup just in case I ever decide to go back.

    I am all into maintaining options, even with Vista! Just kidding; I have no problems with Vista. It ran great on the Toshiba, but I do like Windows 7 a bit more.
    Deadeye81

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I used Partition Wizard to do exactly what you are describing. I deleted the Recovery Partition (Vista) and reclaimed the space on 3 different PCs. Worked like a charm. I love Win 7 and never plan to go back to Vista. If there is ever a chance you may want then Gerald's suggestion of Imaging the Recovery Partition on an Ext HD would suffice. Otherwise, boot it. Win 7 Disk Management will not allow you to recover the space. A third party app must be used.
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    Star Lounger johjue's Avatar
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    Many thanks for all of your responses. I'm still interested in pursuing this but given Bryan's assertion that the system partition start point must be moved left, if I'm understanding what I have correctly (see screen shot below), that's what would have to be done. Just out of curiosity, why is that so? Does the disk drive reference location based on that point? Is it like moving the rest of a pie to the left to fill in the empty spot created when the first piece was removed? Sounds like it would need to be a precision operation! Will the above mentioned apps handle that? Also, what is the 55MB (OEM Partition) to the left of the recovery partition? It appears to be empty.

    Thanks for your help,
    John
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  7. #7
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    See my Post # 5. I did exactly what you are inquiring about.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
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  8. #8
    5 Star Lounger
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    You could still use the 10 gig partition as a seperate partition where its at but it a convention of hard disk management that if you want to reclaim or absorb that space once it is just unallocated space into another existing partition the space must be to the "right" of the partition it is being added to. I'm pretty sure that is because there is no convention for "jumping" sector and track layout tables to a point previous to where the so called start of the partition is. Its sort of like if one mile of new road was added to the beginning of a 9 mile road and it was already marked for mileage. Then how would you mark the real begining of the road? 10? -1? There is no solution to it except to pull up all the markers and move them back all one mile each.

    It is a precision operation so that's why an image or backup of important data should be done first...something goes wrong every so often.

    The 55MB partition is probably a system administration startup and recovery initialization partition. Once the recovery partition is deleted it probably ceases to be useful.

  9. #9
    Star Lounger johjue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    See my Post # 5. I did exactly what you are inquiring about.
    Hi, Ted!

    I did see your first post and would like to go forward and follow your lead, but the existence of the small OEM partition (see above screen shot) to the left of the recovery partition has me proceeding cautiously in light of Byron's (my apologies, I see that I called you Bryan in my last post) information about the system partition start point needing to be moved left. If it has to be moved to the left of the Recovery partition, wouldn't it also have to be moved to the left of the OEM partition? Or just leave the OEM partition alone? It does seem to be empty. A quick Google search has me wondering if it may have held back ups of the junkware that came with the computer. Probably not, but an interesting possibility.

    Were the disks that you successfully did this to configured in the same way as mine, i.e. including an OEM partition? Does it matter? Will Partition Wizard figure it out by itself, while I sit back and watch with my freshly-made disk image waiting in the wings if needed?

    Thanks,
    John
    Dell Inspiron 530 Intel Pentium E2180 dual core @2.00 GHz 4GB Ram Win7 64 bit

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    5 Star Lounger
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    You can delete the OEM partition at the same time as the recovery partition. They should join in one segment of unallocated space.

    Then the second operation would be to move the system partition boundary to its new home.

  11. #11
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Byron Tarbox View Post
    You can delete the OEM partition at the same time as the recovery partition. They should join in one segment of unallocated space.

    Then the second operation would be to move the system partition boundary to its new home.

    This is exactly what I did as well. Deleted both, which auto merged them then used a 3rd party partitioning app to reclaim the space. I do not plan on ever going back to Vista. Why then should I not utilize this space. Some state that this recovery partition will allow going back to Vista factory settings if you ever get rid of your PC, but this seems a lame reason to me as I keep PCs until they get as old and gray as me. I suppose if you regularly switch PCs this might be a viable reason to keep the recovery partition.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


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  12. #12
    Star Lounger johjue's Avatar
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    My appreciation to all for taking the time to help with my question.

    Roderunner- I've grabbed the Acronis user's manual and am finding it very useful, thanks for recommending it. I'll be imaging the Recovery Partition before deleting.

    Gerald- Thanks for the advice on saving an image of the Vista partition, I may be glad I still have it someday.

    Byron- Thanks for your input which caused me to slow down and be careful, and for teaching me something new.

    Ted- I've grabbed Partition Wizard on your advice and will use it when I make this change next weekend after finishing up an old home video project that I'm in the middle of. Your assertion that you had been successful doing the exact same thing has brought me much comfort; thanks for letting me know that.

    Enjoy your weekend!
    John
    Dell Inspiron 530 Intel Pentium E2180 dual core @2.00 GHz 4GB Ram Win7 64 bit

  13. #13
    Bronze Lounger
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    Here are a couple of other thoughts, in part inspired by a recent post in the Windows 7 forum that renewed my interest in virtual mode. Most if not all of us absorbed the cost of upgrading programs to suit Windows 7 when we migrated, but in fact you can run both Vista and XP very successfully in virtual mode. This means that you can run any expensive programs you happen to have for, say, Vista, in Windows in virtual mode without having to upgrade to the Win 7 version so long as you have a valid Vista installation available. If you eliminate your valid Vista OS entirely, than you will no longer have a platform on which to run any such programs. (You may, I presume, take a performance hit by running it in virtual mode, but you won't have to upgrade the program.) You may in fact already have it but have forgotten it, for the simple reason that when the computer was new you were given the chance to make a single backup of of the Vista OS partition to two DVDs, if I recall correctly, and they may still be kicking around somewhere.

    I must add in haste that I am interested but have never tried this nifty stuff myself (and I have Win 7 Ultimate), and if there are any experts out there who would like to enlighten us in such matters, all advice would be welcome. (I guess virtual machine is the term I have been trying to use.)

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