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  1. #1
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    I have 2 internal drives on my W7 Home Premium system: an 80 gig C drive, and a 500 gig G drive.

    I have my data on the G drive, along with all the "My folders" etc.

    Are their advantages to creating a separate partiton on G for the swap file?

    Are their better ways to organize these 2 drives?

    I'd appreciate any helpful comments.
    Thanks,
    Dick

  2. #2
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    Do you have 3 or more gigs of RAM installed? If so and with today's areal density and access times, not much to be gained with a swap file on the other drive, unless there is a space issue on the system drive. Also to take maximum advantage of such a setup you'd have to backup the drive, remove the partitions and create the swap file partition first so it was placed on the fastest access area of the drive possible.

    Pretty standard setup the way it is so its easier to image the system drive and also easy to backup the data on its own drive/partition.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Yes, there is an advantage to having the swap file on a seperate hard drive. Both drives can be accessed at the same time. Also, having a small partition dedicated to the swap file (containing no other files) means that the swap file will never fragment, which is another advantage. And regardless of the amount of RAM you have installed, Windows will use a swap file unless you completely disable it.

    There are a number of free partitioning tools that will allow you to create a small partition and slide it to the beginning of the drive. It will take a little time, but you only have to do it once. I use a 4.5 GB partition and a fixed swap file of 4095 KB on all my systems. (If you make the partition much smaller than 4.5 GB, Windows will nag you about not having much free space on the partition if the swap file is 4095 KB.)

    Do it once and forget it. (And your system drive image won't waste space with a swap file.)
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
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    Hi Byron:
    Thanks for the response. I have only 2 gigs of memory; and I dont know if that makes a difference in what you
    suggested.

    Dick

  5. #5
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    bbearren:

    Thanks. What you suggest makes sense to me. I may have "lucked" out.
    My data drive (G, in my case) was in the process of dying, so I have temporarily
    moved everything off of G and over to my C drive.

    Tomorrow I' m bringing my PC into the shop to have a new drive put in (that G drive is fairly new,
    and under warranty.

    So, as soon as the new drive is put in, I'll bring the PC home and set up the 4.5 gig partition
    and allocate my swap file to it. Then I'll move my data files back to their own 2nd partition
    on my G drive.

    Thanks again,
    Dick

  6. #6
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y View Post
    bbearren:

    Thanks. What you suggest makes sense to me. I may have "lucked" out.
    My data drive (G, in my case) was in the process of dying, so I have temporarily
    moved everything off of G and over to my C drive.

    Tomorrow I' m bringing my PC into the shop to have a new drive put in (that G drive is fairly new,
    and under warranty.

    So, as soon as the new drive is put in, I'll bring the PC home and set up the 4.5 gig partition
    and allocate my swap file to it. Then I'll move my data files back to their own 2nd partition
    on my G drive.

    Thanks again,
    Dick
    The last drive that went south on me was 5 years and 1 month old, with a 5 year warranty. You did luck out.

    Having a fresh drive to start out with makes it really simple. When you get the partitions set up, be sure to configure your Recycle Bin properties for no Recycle Bin on the swap file partition.

    Good luck!
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  7. #7
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    Thanks bbearren. I wouldn't have thought of that point about the recycle bin
    and the swap file partition. Thumbs up.

    Dick

  8. #8
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick-Y View Post
    Thanks bbearren. I wouldn't have thought of that point about the recycle bin
    and the swap file partition. Thumbs up.

    Dick
    Even after you've set the "no Recycle Bin" option for the swap file partition, don't be surprised to see an empty Recycle Bin folder in that partition in Windows Explorer. It won't be used, and it only takes up one sector on the partition (it's only uses around 140 Bytes). You can delete it, but Windows will put it back. As long as you have the properties of the Recycle Bin set correctly, it's nothing to worry about; just an empty folder that makes Windows happy.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  9. #9
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    bbearren:
    Thanks again for your helpful comments.
    Dick

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