Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    53
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I am using Windows XP. I needed to update to USB 2.0. I bought a USB 2.0 card, and the instructioins say to simply install and NO dirvers are needed for Win XP. I think I went to the site they mentioned = www.drivers-download.com = and did not find any drivers for Win XP - only for Win 98 and such as listed in the instuctions.

    The card does NOT run at USB 2.0 speed, and I get messages about "this device could run faster..........." if I hook up a thumb drive or similar device.

    1 ) Suggestions ???????????

    2) Since it is a PCI device, I understand there is a PECKING ORDER for PCI devices. The board has NO numbers for PCI devices. Is the PCI slot closest to the processor number 1 ? How do I know ? Sometimes people recommend to MOVE the PCI card to a different slot.

    3) I have read on the USB MAN website that a card with an NEC chip is better than one with a VIA chip card since VIA chips can be somewhat problematic ? Any comments ?
    This card has an NEC chip.

    THIS IS THE CARD THAT I BOUGHT SOME TIME BACK IN 8/07 BUT NEVER USED TIL NOW >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?InvtId=SD-V2-5U

    Thanks in advance for any advice.

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    South of the North Pole
    Posts
    919
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Do you have the Enhanced PCI to USB Host Controller installed in device manager? Also take a look at Other devices; any yellow question marks on something that may pertain to USB? If so try right clicking on it and choose update driver and let it check Windows Update for a driver. If that's the problem it should install from there, move down into the USB controllers area and be fixed.

  3. #3
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    53
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Original poster here.............

    Thanks for the reply.............NO yellow marks anywhere in Device Manager.
    I took a screenshot of the USB section and found this...........USB2 ENHANCED CONTROLLER.
    I am not a computer nerd, but looks normal to me.
    Don't understand all that is here.

    OOPS, I can't insert a screenshot.............guess it would have to be made into an attachment and then sent with this posting.

    In any event, the screenshot shows the following >>>>>>>>>

    5 USB Root Hubs
    1 USB mass storage device
    4 Intel 8280 1EB USB Universal Host Controllers with different numbers at the ends like 24D2 etc,

    1 Intel 8280 1EB USB2 Enhanced Host Controller

    Without understanding it all, it looks like I have ENHANCED USB 2.0 INSTALLED.

    Yet, I get the "this device could perform faster message".

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Muswellbrook, NSW,, Australia
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    G'day Arthur

    open Control Panel - System -Hardware -Device Manager expand the Universal Serial Bus controller and look for USB 2.0 Enhanced Host Controller
    if it is not present you will have to download and install it. If present read the next section.

    open My Computer right-click the USB drive then select Properties - Hardware

    highlight the USB drive then select Properties - Policies tick the radio button Optimise for Perfomance then OK your way back out.

    John

  5. #5
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Porirua Wellington New Zealand
    Posts
    21
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 5 Times in 3 Posts
    Hi, what XP SP are you running? If you have SP3, you will have no problem with your card as XP has all necessary drivers. The link you showed from your purchase time, shows a CD with drivers for the card. Did you run the CD?

  6. #6
    3 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    301
    Thanks
    65
    Thanked 39 Times in 30 Posts
    Based on the hardware list from your post, you DO NOT have the NEC USB2.0 card ready.

    If your system sees the NEC USB card, it should show in the Device Manager Hardware List,
    under "Universal Serial Bus Controller", several of this would have been listed (at least two):

    "NEC PCI to USB Open Host Controller".

    ONE of two problems (or both) you may have and needing to solve:
    1. Some motherboards refuse to give up its on-board USB circuit, and continues to usurp all USB signals.
    Resolution: You MUST DISABLE the on-board USB in the BIOS setup, before you can see the NEC card. Some motherboards do allow co-existence of two USB circuits. Some don't.
    2. PCI slot location conflict. You may have hardware or Interrupt conflict somewhere. (Yes! IRQ problem is still in Windows).
    Resolution: Move the NEC card to a different PCI slot and HARD reboot. Try all PCI slots, one at a time, reboot every time and check hardware list, if you have to.

    Disabling on-board USB circuit may render your PC's front USB connection not working. Your NEC card has 4 connectors in the rear and 1 internal to the PC. You may reroute your PC front panel USB wire harness to this internal connector on the NEC card. Depending on the wire harness header or connector type, it may require higher technical skill to do the rerouting and modification.

    At least you get your rear USB connectors at USB2.0 speed.

    You may buy a powered USB hub connected to one of the rear USB2.0 outputs, and put the USB hub on top of the PC or on the desk. That way, you can connect USB devices conveniently.
    You MUST use powered USB hub.
    Each USB outlet is rated 5V, 500mA (can be as high as 600mA). A non-powered hub means limiting to one USB load only (500mA), even though the hub has 4-7 USB outlets. That is because the only power is from one USB outlet from the NEC card.

    Note that small USB hard drive (laptop hard drive size) takes power from the USB, requiring one USB load power. Without a powered USB hub, you cannot connect two small USB hard drives to the hub. Some USB flash drives may also need one full-load power to work too, thus limiting the non-powered hub to one-device hub!

    Alternatively, buy 4 USB extension cables to extend from the rear. In fact, this is the highest speed method. (A hub shares all the devices to only one USB outlet on the NEC card.)

    If you can find the information, try get the largest wire gauge cable (wire size, not the cable plastic size). At 500mA, aka one full load, the Voltage drop by the Ohmic resistance of the wire is not small. Logic signal will not work if the voltage seen by the device at the other end of the cable is below 4.5V.

    Frequently USB cable length is the hidden problem. It renders USB hard drive not working, SD card reader not working, wireless device not working, etc. Imagine, you have USB connector from the rear of the PC, and you grab a cheap 6-foot USB cable ...
    That's why some SD card readers and wireless devices even come with their own USB extension cables. They are fat and as short as possible.

    Some smart USB hard drive makers include a Y-shape USB cable. You plug into two USB outlets. Since each outlet gives you 500mA, two would be 1A, more than enough to spin up the hard drive. (Old laptop hard drive design needs between 500mA to 600mA to spin up. It is at the limit of one USB full load.)

  7. #7
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northern Jersey
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    S. Caisson has a few points that need to be checked. Do that.

    I used to moderate at USBMan. That "Intel" Enhanced controller is either a mistake *or* you have an Intel motherboard with USB 2.0 onboard already. In the case of the former, uninstalling all USB controller and then hubs in Device Manager and rebooting may fix it. If it's the latter, you may not have Service Pack 2 or better. SP2 is required if you want USB 2.0.

    Keep in mind that cheap USB cables may also cause slow performance. While all USB cables meet the standard for USB 1.0, cheap USB 1.0 cables may not work for USB 2.0. Always use quality cables.

    Also, it's not necessary to disable onboard USB controllers in order to use that card. It may be a good idea to disable it until the NEC is installed, but you should re-enable them afterward. The should work together just fine on a healthy system.
    MS MCP, MCSE, MVP

  8. #8
    New Lounger ValekHawke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, North Carolina
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Also you may want to check your BIOS to make sure that USB 2.0 is enabled. (OK, just re-read your original post - it looks like it is...but still, keep reading...) Along with making sure that USB 2.0 is in fact enabled in the BIOS, you will also want to make sure that there is no setting such as "USB 2.0 Controller Mode" that is improperly set and thus limiting your speed. While each motherboard manufacturer is different there are only a small number of BIOS vendors and you will need to check the manual that came with your motherboard for the exact location of the setting to check. On my particular motherboard, an Asus P4P800-E Deluxe, the setting is located under the "Advanced" header, "USB Configuration". Under that section you can make sure that the USB 2.0 controller is in fact enabled AND that it is set to the proper mode, which would be "HiSpeed (480Mbps)" as opposed to "Full Speed (12 Mbps)" or disabled as some of the other members have suggested.

    One thing that you didn't mention and it may turn out to be a hitch in your giddy-up is whether or not you have a "branded" computer such as Dell or Compaq/HP or the like. IF you do then you may or may not be able to change that particular setting as the big box manufacturers tend to lock their BIOS settings down somewhat, BUT on the other hand, if it is a branded computer then chances are that the USB 2.0 controller is already running at the HiSpeed setting to begin with. The only way to know will be to actually go into the BIOS and snoop around - just be careful. If you accidentally change a setting then you can always "Exit Without Saving Changes" and you'll be OK. Each computer / motherboard manufacturer has a different method to access the BIOS. This is usually done by pressing a certain key during the system boot. For example mine requires that I press the "DELETE" key while the system is booting in order to access the BIOS. Dell computers I believe you have to press either the F2 or F12 key during boot but I don't remember right now. No matter what key it is, when the system first boots it will tell you on the monitor what key to push (But only for a couple of seconds so you have to be watching and paying attention and if you miss it you can reboot right away by pressing the ctrl+alt+del keys simultaneously). Usually you have to press the key repeatedly during the boot process in order for it to "catch" and you may have to reboot several times until you get it. The BIOS is navigated by using the arrow keys on the right side of the keyboard and exiting is done by one of the F-keys depending on what you want to do - save your changes or Exit without saving. Usually navigation instructions are printed on the bottom or right hand side of the BIOS screen.

    I hope this helps.
    If you think you're having a bad day, just remember that somewhere out there someone has Snooki as a Mom...

  9. #9
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Whidbey Island, Washington, USA
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I'm a little late to the party here but there's a nifty program from Microsoft called UVCView. Very technical but it will tell you everything about every USB port and controller on your system. The program was almost impossible to find now, but here's the link, which I discovered after about 20 minutes of searching:
    UVCView

    Hope this helps someone, it sure did for me. Sorry, I can't for the life of me remember where I found the link originally.


    -- Carole
    There are 10 kinds of people in the world:
    Those who understand binary
    and those who don't.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •