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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    I am wanting to learn how to build a website. I have absolutely no experience in it. Can someone tell me of a good book that I can buy to get me started or any other clues? I'd appreciate it. My boss would like me to start thinking about building our own website.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    One of my favorite beginner books is Teach Yourself HTML and CSS in 24 hours (Sams Publishing).

  3. #3
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    It's hard to know where to start. I have some great books, but none of them really begins at the beginning.

    There are plenty of online reference materials, but these generally presuppose some familiarity with HTML. There also are free online courses designed around a particular vendor's solution (e.g., Microsoft Expression Web or Adobe Dreamweaver), but these may involve proprietary features that you end up not being able to use.

    Perhaps start with the w3schools tutorial: HTML Tutorial.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Some books I've found useful:
    XHTML In Plain English, Sandra E. Eddy, ISBN:0-7645-4743-7, MT Books
    Cascading Style Sheets The Definitive Guide, Eric A. Meyer, ISBN: 1-56592-622-6, O'Reilly
    JavaScript The Definitive Guide, David Flanagan, 1-56592-392-8, O'Reilly
    Effective Web Design Second Edition, Ann Navarro, ISBN: 0-7821-2849-1, Sybex

    These are not new books but still valid and you should be able to find them on used book sites at a considerable discount. The O'Reilly books are good references. The XHTML book it both tutorial and reference. The Design book is the one to read first! The coding part is easy, good design not so!

    Good Luck
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

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  5. #5
    3 Star Lounger
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    Thank you all for your suggestions. That gives me something to start with.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    The (free) sample chapter for the following book covers a wide range of "best practices" for web developers: APRESS.COM : Pro Javascript RIA Techniques: Best Practices, Performance and Presentation. It contains sections with recommendations for using HTML and CSS, structuring folders and organizing files on your web server, and selecting a text editor. It might not all make sense, but you might want to keep it handy as a reference.

  7. #7
    3 Star Lounger
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    Thanks, jscher2000. I have that bookmarked

  8. #8
    Platinum Lounger
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    I am a lecturer at a College in London, England and from my experience the best way to learn web skills is to go on a short course at a local college or adult education centre. In a short time we can normally a student who knows nothing up to building linked pages with cascading style sheets.

    So, depending on your learning style I would also complement your learning with the excellent books listed above and a short, tutor-led course. I promise you , you will reap the benefits... just my 2 cents worth
    Jerry

  9. #9
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    That's what I should have been for Halloween.

  10. #10
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    The books recommended mainly relate to technical aspects of building a website. I would add to the list "The Non-Designers Web Book", Williams & Tollett, ISBN 0-321-30337-7. This will show you how to build a site that is attractive and useable.
    I also found "Web Designer's Reference", Craig Grannell, ISBN 1-59059-430-4 a useful guide to HTML and CSS.

    George

  11. #11
    3 Star Lounger
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    Thanks everyone. I bought the 'Teach Yourself HTML and CSS in 24 Hours' and am starting with that. I appreciate the response I got.

  12. #12
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    I use Web Studio, easy to use and plenty of features..
    Great support and forums....

    Here's a link to my site that I built with Web Studio http://www.domdedomdom.com/
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  13. #13
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    Visual Way of Doing it

    Try WYSIWYG Web Builder if you've use a layout program like Publisher then it is something similar and a lot more for very very reasonable cost. I'm not connected to the developer but a satisfied user. If you favor coding there are areas in the program where you can insert your own codes to customized your website. There are plenty of addins (alot of them free and some paid ones from the developer and user contributors) called extensions that you will find really cool. Bells and whistle for your site without coding through the use of extensions.
    Last edited by jolas; 2011-01-18 at 18:24.

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