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  1. #1
    iNET Interactive
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    LANGALIST PLUS

    Preparing for the switch to the IPv6 standard


    By Fred Langa

    The next standard for Internet addressing — Internet Protocol Version 6 or "IPv6" — is almost here.

    Here's a quick update on IPv6, its status, and what you need to know for the rollout.

    The full text of this column is posted at WindowsSecrets.com/2010/10/21/05 (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by revia; 2011-01-19 at 14:49.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    Interesting timing!

    Wednesday's Networking blog, Fixing Windows 7 IPv6 Headaches by Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols states a few issues with Microsoft's IPv6 implementation in Windows 7. He mentions a command line fix to resolve the NDP issue.

    Hopefully these issues will be resolved in the next Service Pack.

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    This is my first attempt to use the Lounge, so don't know if I'm doing it correctly. My aim is report a problem with Fred Langa's article.
    I wanted to learn more about reviving a hard drive, so clicked on his link to his prior articles on the subject. That only took me to a prior WS page, but neither of the four links to his article worked and the link to Tech Republic's "200 Ways to Revive a Hard Drive" did take me to the TR site, but they no longer have the article available to download and as far as I could tell, it was not even available to read onsite.
    I hope Fred, or someone, can tell me how to obtain this information.
    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Hi Jay,

    Unfortunately, I found the links to be dead as well. The only article I am able to fine is "200 Ways To Revive a Hard Drive" originally published by TechRepublic. Use this link to be able to view it in the online Google Docs PDF reader.

    The links in Fred's main article released today are in working order.

    To locate more info on the subject, use your favorite search engine to scour the Internet.


    Hope this helps.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

  5. #5
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    What about personal routers that people have on their broadband connections? Some may not be able to handle IPV6 addressing on the WAN or Internet side of the router. The third party DD-WRT router firmware is capable of handling IPV6.

  6. #6
    New Lounger
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    A website that offers free IP v6 training.

    http://ipv6.he.net/certification/

  7. #7
    New Lounger
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    I am concerned about the implementation of IPv6 on my network. I have a WRT310N router 12 devices connected in a combination of CAT5 and wirelessly. I understand that Linksys might release a firmware update for the router. However, with the IP change,, will I not have to reconfigure all of the network devices to maintain the network?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ranson View Post
    What about personal routers that people have on their broadband connections? Some may not be able to handle IPV6 addressing on the WAN or Internet side of the router. The third party DD-WRT router firmware is capable of handling IPV6.
    That's a relief! I have a Netgear WGR614v6 open source router and the standard Netgear firmware does not support IPv6! Guess I'll have to put the DD-WRT firmware on it at that time. I have not done so now because it's confusing as to how to install it, which type file to use and then the fear of "bricking" the router which is a pain-in-the-ass to unbrick! The biggest problem is the cable modem which is relatively new but has no support for IPv6 and my Windows XP Professional custom built and installed desktop. There doesn't appear to be any support for IPv6 in Windows XP Professional even with Service Pack 3. I really don't want to lose that system and it doesn't have quite enough resources to run Windows 7.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Greb View Post
    I am concerned about the implementation of IPv6 on my network. I have a WRT310N router 12 devices connected in a combination of CAT5 and wirelessly. I understand that Linksys might release a firmware update for the router. However, with the IP change,, will I not have to reconfigure all of the network devices to maintain the network?
    Yup Jack you will! Cable modem or DSL modem will have to be replaced and any operating system below Vista won't go on the Internet anymore! The only hope for this is if you can do Network Address Translation or Port Address Translation from IPv6 on the outside of your network to IPv4 on the inside of your network, (translated to your private 192 Class C address). Does DD-WRT do this I wonder? Remember that the cable modem is outside of your private network and has to support IPv6 to work! Being able to network address translate from Ipv6 to Ipv4 on the inside of your network might indeed solve a lot of headaches and I'm hoping that this is available as a solution because my XP desktop would be internet-less from that point forward! Please Microsoft a Service Pack 4 update for XP Professional]...please!

    I have a possible solution to some of the problems I have described. To keep say an Windows XP machine on the Internet you can do something called Network Address Translation. Inside your network you run IPv4, maintaining the private addressing that you already have. You translate to IPv6 at your gateway and everything from that point forward is IPv6! This solves a lot of problems. You may have to replace your modem and install new firmware or replace the wireless router but you would still be able to run your equipment using IPv4 withinyour network and IPv6 outside! This is probably how we will do it without having to replace all our reliable older stuff!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ranson View Post
    What about personal routers that people have on their broadband connections? Some may not be able to handle IPV6 addressing on the WAN or Internet side of the router. The third party DD-WRT router firmware is capable of handling IPV6.
    But can it do Network Address Translation from Ipv6 on the outside to the IPv4 192 class C on the inside? Does anybody know this? This would make life much easier as I could continue to run my Windows XP Professional desktop without any problems. Would have to change the nice Linksys CM100 cable modem unless they offer a firmware update and then how in the heck do you install that in a cable modem? Whichever way you look at it, there's going to be some equipment casualties in all this whether we like it or not!

  11. #11
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Morse III View Post
    But can it do Network Address Translation from Ipv6 on the outside to the IPv4 192 class C on the inside? Does anybody know this? This would make life much easier as I could continue to run my Windows XP Professional desktop without any problems. Would have to change the nice Linksys CM100 cable modem unless they offer a firmware update and then how in the heck do you install that in a cable modem? Whichever way you look at it, there's going to be some equipment casualties in all this whether we like it or not!
    Here's what Comcast is doing about this issue. It's called Dual-Stacking. You could use both IPv6 and IPv4 on the same home network. It's Open Source software code. You would not need special equipment or setup beyond the initial (technician visit) swap-out to a new IPv6 Cable Modem. I trust DSL and UVerse would follow suit.

    So we XP holdouts will have options.
    -- Bob Primak --

  12. #12
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    In the latest "Secrets" Fred says, "Newer office and home routers should be able to pass IPv6 addresses without trouble. Older models may require a firmware update or possible replacement. (You should find IPv6 info for your brand and model of router at the manufacturer's site.)"

    I think he's being rather optimistic, to say the least. My Linksys E3000 wireless router doesn't support IPv6 and the Linksys rep I chatted with on-line doesn't believe there are any plans for a firmware update to enable it, although he wasn't certain. A search for other home routers supporting it turned up none, from any manufacturer, although I admit that the search wasn't exhaustive.

    It appears that switching to IPv6 is happening way faster than the industry is enabling us to keep up with the switch. Maybe I'm cynical, but could this be intentional? "Gee, we're sorry, but your 3-month-old router isn't capable of upgrading to IPv6, but for only an additional $159.99 (after rebate) you can purchase this shiny new router with all the latest features, including IPv6."

    BTW, at least some cable modem manufacturers are ahead of the routers. My Motorola SB6120 already claims to support IPv6, as well as DOCSIS 3.0.

  13. #13
    5 Star Lounger RussB's Avatar
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    I can understand your pessimism, but not all corporations are as deceitful as our government.
    Do you "Believe"? Do you vote? Please Read:
    LEARN something today so you can TEACH something tomorrow.
    DETAIL in your question promotes DETAIL in my answer.
    Dominus Vobiscum <))>(

  14. #14
    New Lounger
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    Fred et al,

    I am generally interested in all things "computer" ... so when I moved to Windows 7 Professional last year, I was happy to see IPv6 in the network connections.

    My problem is that I get the dreaded "No network access" in the "IPv6 Connectivity:" field when viewing the Local Connection Status. And no IPv6 newtork address. Google searches, registry hacks, messing with the teredo tunneling pseudo-interface have all proved fruitless at getting IPv6 network access. Network troubleshooter also yields no "No problems found."

    It seems like I should know this ... but ... Is it possible that my router/switch is old hence Windows won't allow IPv6?

    Is there a procedure where the IPv6 can be "set up" or reset? If not, perhaps you could consider writing an article on the subject.

  15. #15
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Damian Szigeti View Post
    Fred et al,

    I am generally interested in all things "computer" ... so when I moved to Windows 7 Professional last year, I was happy to see IPv6 in the network connections.

    My problem is that I get the dreaded "No network access" in the "IPv6 Connectivity:" field when viewing the Local Connection Status. And no IPv6 newtork address. Google searches, registry hacks, messing with the teredo tunneling pseudo-interface have all proved fruitless at getting IPv6 network access. Network troubleshooter also yields no "No problems found."

    It seems like I should know this ... but ... Is it possible that my router/switch is old hence Windows won't allow IPv6?

    Is there a procedure where the IPv6 can be "set up" or reset? If not, perhaps you could consider writing an article on the subject.

    It could be your router. Some models are not up to the task of addressing in IPv6. Or, it could be your ISP. Some Providers are not yet ready for IPv6, but all soon will be. If the modem is provided by your ISP, the modem may not be capable of IPv6, and will have to be replaced.

    -- Bob Primak --

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