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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    My system is Intel DH55HC board, i7 860, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 ultimate x64, latest BIOS TCIBX10H.86A.0039.2010.0722.1419 from 22.07.2010

    Driver for NIC is the latest available from Intel DL center v 15.3 (Driver version 11.6.92.0)

    After the computer is running for a while, when I surf or download, the computer slows to a halt, as long as the network activity continues. When it stops, PC returns to normal.
    After some research I found out that during the slowdown I have very high DPC latencies (>10000 microseconds). I see that very clearly using DPC latency checker utility from http://www.thesycon.de/eng/latency_check.shtml A reboot rests the DPC latencies for a while.

    After some web searching I found a thread http://social.technet.microsoft.com/...?prof=required , and used Windows Performance Tools Kit to track down the problem to NDIS.sys:



    I added a Realtek 8139 PCI NIC replacing the onboard NIC and the problem is a little less crippling - but still there.
    I tested a PC with an nForce chipset - and it does not have the problem,

    I have found other people having the same problem with different boards/NICs:
    http://www.sevenforums.com/network-s...latency-4.html
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/...?prof=required

    I have opened a support ticket with Intel, but so far they have not found a solution or explanation.
    While waiting , I have found a way to reset the DPC latencies without a reboot: Restarting the Base Filtering Engine service.

    So there appears to be a bug in W7 x64 , relating to NDIS.sys and Base Filtering Engine service (which controls IPsec and Windows firewall)

    Has anyone here had this problem? Can anyone suggest a solution or explanation?

  2. #2
    Star Lounger
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    Is your network properly terminated? If signals are reflecting around continously, they will cause increasing larger collisions to occur as time progresses, thus slowing the network down increasingly. Check your entire network for network connectors that are connected to a device but open on the other side. Remove any of these that you find. If per chance you are using an older style bus structure, both sides of the coax need to be terminated to prevent signals bouncing around in the coax! It sounds like you're having excessive collisions on the network and I would suspect that is because your network is not properly terminated.

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Morse III View Post
    Is your network properly terminated? If signals are reflecting around continously, they will cause increasing larger collisions to occur as time progresses, thus slowing the network down increasingly. Check your entire network for network connectors that are connected to a device but open on the other side. Remove any of these that you find. If per chance you are using an older style bus structure, both sides of the coax need to be terminated to prevent signals bouncing around in the coax! It sounds like you're having excessive collisions on the network and I would suspect that is because your network is not properly terminated.
    Hi Allen,
    My network is properly terminated. The problem appears on only one computer on the Network. As I've stated, restarting the Base Filtering Engine service (IPSEC & Firewall) gets rid of the problem temporarily. I suspect that it's a Windows firewall problem with the NIC driver.

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