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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    I have two questions about backup: The first is how can one test whether a backup will properly restore without screwing up what's currently on the computer?
    Twice in the past few years I've thought I had backup CDs or DVDs only to find I had expensive coasters when Windows died and I really needed the backup. I can't even recall the name of the first backup program, but the last was a recent experience with Acronis True Image 2010.
    With all the glowing reviews of Acronis I thought I surely had it covered with that one, but I couldn't get one thing restored with it either. Then I read that many people had big problems with the 2010 version. Fantastic!
    Now the second related question: I have read several times, the last being a recent article by Fred Langa, that a disc image will restore absolutely everything just as it was before a "Big Nasty" came along. No messing with reactivations or any of those extra hassles. Does this also apply if one has to replace major parts, such as a hard drive (my last big issue)? What about if the whole computer is replaced? Can the image be placed on the new computer with everything working just as it did on the old one?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger
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    First question answer is with another hard drive that you swap in. Also helps to always verify an image and also mount that image and spot check the integrity of the files, especially the important data files.

    Second question is it depends on the nature and amount of change. Change a hard drive, no prob., change a power supply, no prob., change something that is integral and identifying to the system, like a mobo, reactivation city most likely, and, related to the second half of the question, the image may not work at all as is--depending on what changes, often something called a bare-metal restore must be the process used to get an image with different hardware "locked" into it, working again.

    You can do it with identically spec'ed computers, but even then certain programs will be unhappy (including Windows) with the mismatched hardware IDs, requiring reactivation, but at least the image will run.

  3. #3
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Wells View Post
    I have two questions about backup: The first is how can one test whether a backup will properly restore without screwing up what's currently on the computer?
    Twice in the past few years I've thought I had backup CDs or DVDs only to find I had expensive coasters when Windows died and I really needed the backup. I can't even recall the name of the first backup program, but the last was a recent experience with Acronis True Image 2010.
    With all the glowing reviews of Acronis I thought I surely had it covered with that one, but I couldn't get one thing restored with it either. Then I read that many people had big problems with the 2010 version. Fantastic!
    Now the second related question: I have read several times, the last being a recent article by Fred Langa, that a disc image will restore absolutely everything just as it was before a "Big Nasty" came along. No messing with reactivations or any of those extra hassles. Does this also apply if one has to replace major parts, such as a hard drive (my last big issue)? What about if the whole computer is replaced? Can the image be placed on the new computer with everything working just as it did on the old one?
    Thanks.
    Jay, the biggest mistake made by nearly everybody is following other users advice instead of reading the manufacturers guide to installation and use.
    From the attached image, what would or did you do first.

    [attachment=90795:Capture.JPG]
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  4. #4
    Gold Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Wells View Post
    With all the glowing reviews of Acronis I thought I surely had it covered with that one, but I couldn't get one thing restored with it either. Then I read that many people had big problems with the 2010 version. Fantastic!
    Jay,
    Hello... I have use Acronis 2010 v7046 and have done a "zillion" backup and recoveries without a problem. Could you provide some more information ?
    1. What OS.
    2. What version of TI 2010
    3. What backup \ restore method used... Full , incremental, clone.
    4. Did you try to run the backup \ restore from the boot-able disk, (CD) .Or from within Windows.
    5. Did the backup \ restore stop or give an error message.
    6. Are you using an external \ internal HD.
    Any information will help to resolve the problem .. Regards Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  5. #5
    Silver Lounger
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    Hello Byron.

    You might appreciate that the re-activation is triggered by too many changes in a machine. Booting looks at the whole and takes "votes", you are allowed to loose up to 10, ( see correction below ). The ethernet is worth 2 ( 3 ) votes, the HD and the rest is worth 1 vote apiece. If you are really interested, I could dig out the .doc on this and post it here, I have changed quite a few items in my many machines and never triggered the check, it is pretty loose.

    This concerns XP, I wonder if W-7 is the same ???

    A great evening to you..........Jean.

    Edit : Out of curiosity, I dug out the .doc and I have to correct myself as my RAM was defective, WPA checks 10 items but you are allowed to loose three votes on booting, keep in mind that the 10/100 is worth these three votes, you change it with any other device and a call to MS will be required. This is a text from Alex Nicol (RIP) of a few years back and about XP and its WPA. I fancy that Vista and W-7 would be close to the same.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Always restore images from a boot environment with the use of the software's boot disk and avoid doing so from within active Windows.
    The first is how can one test whether a backup will properly restore without screwing up what's currently on the computer?
    To check the integrity of an imaged backup you will need to restore it. It is the only 100% way to verify the complete process is in a known good working state.
    You will want to ensure that you are capable of identifying the saved image file from either DVD or hard drive location by actually going through the process of a restore from the software's boot disk.
    Now the second related question: I have read several times, the last being a recent article by Fred Langa, that a disc image will restore absolutely everything just as it was before a "Big Nasty" came along. No messing with reactivations or any of those extra hassles. Does this also apply if one has to replace major parts, such as a hard drive (my last big issue)? What about if the whole computer is replaced? Can the image be placed on the new computer with everything working just as it did on the old one?
    Your motherboard will be the determining factor of the need to reactivate Windows. If you change your motherboard you will need to reactivate windows. Not a big deal though.
    If you change out your motherboard you should be doing a complete clean install of the operating system. With an image you'll have the wrong drivers.
    A hard drive change out will not prompt for activation. Depending upon the software used, your partitions if any should be similarly sized or HDD similarly sized.
    Can the image be placed on the new computer with everything working just as it did on the old one?
    NO.
    If you buy a new computer your previously made image(s) on the other system should not be used on it.
    DRIVE IMAGING
    Invest a little time and energy in a well thought out BACKUP regimen and you will have minimal down time, and headache.

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