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  1. #1
    iNET Interactive
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    LANGALIST PLUS


    Forcefully rooting out a bad hardware driver






    By Fred Langa

    Sometimes you have to rip out a bad driver by its roots in order to install a new and better driver.

    A skillful reader tracks down and solves a driver problem before Fred can even reply!


    The full text of this column is posted at WindowsSecrets.com/2010/12/09/06 (paid content, opens in a new window/tab). Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by andyfboyd; 2011-01-18 at 15:07.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    I was curious to read your recommendation that Karl get rid of RAID. You suggest that 10,000 RPM disks are cheap and fast and reliable so one wouldn't need RAID. But currently there are no 1 TB 10,000 RPM drives on the market. Besides, aren't two 7,200 RPM drives equivalent to a 14,400 RPM drive for streaming data off a disk? I have RAID 0 and I buy it because I do a lot of video processing. I need to be able to stream a lot of data quickly off the disk. Cache and faster interfaces don't help if ultimately performance is throttled by a slower effective RPM.

    Not to mention that 10,000 RPM drives are nearly 5 times more expense per megabyte than 7,200 RPM drives!

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    I was surprised to see the following in your column:

    "For example, in 1987 a 10MB drive cost about $900, or a whopping $90 per megabyte.

    But today, hard-drive storage cost has dropped by a factor of 10,000 (!) to around $0.09 per megabyte. (For example, you can buy a 1TB drive for about $90.) So saving money fails as a rational argument in favor of RAID."

    I sure don't want to pay $0.09 / MB!!

    I think the math is "dropped by a factor of 10,000,000 (!!), to around $0.00009 per megabyte (or, $0.09 / GB)...

    Hard to fathom...

  4. #4
    2 Star Lounger
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    The advice that "RAID is now considered ancient computer tech" is simply wrong. To be sure, for a desktop system used to check email and surf the web, RAID is not necessary. But RAID0 is a wonderful way to speed up the performance of a computer, especially now that CPU speeds have stalled.

    I've been running a 3-disk RAID0 D: drive on my home desktop with great results. A 4th disk is used for boot (C: drive). I get very good, snappy interactive performance because I put programs on the D: drive. Recently I switched the C drive to an SSD, and moved the programs back to the C: drive, for another slight performance boost. I've measured the performance of the D: drive and it's always been better than the fastest 10K RPM Raptor or whatever single drive.

    At work we replace our machines every 3 years. This year we got a batch of new machines with a large 2-disk RAID0 setup (500GB each). Wow! The performance is so good I canceled the order for a boot SSD drive, we just don't need it.

    RAID0 is relatively cheap way to get both great performance and more storage. Every system should be backed up anyway, so I don't consider the reliability decrease a factor. As for the OP's problem, simply replace the problem drive with an identical or similar one, problem solved. Make an image backup first.

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