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  1. #1
    Bronze Lounger
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    My OS is Win 7 Pro 32 bit.

    I am contemplating doing the following in order to transfer the contents of my C drive to drive D, and vice versa.

    I.Create an up to date image of my C drive on internal drive H. (I already have a complete backup of my D drive).

    2.Format C and D.

    3.Reverse the names of C and D.

    4.Use my Win 7 repair disk to restore the system image to the renamed C drive.

    5.Restore the renamed D drive from the backup.

    The reason I want to do this is that I am running out of space on my D drive, whereas the C drive is comparatively empty.

    I would appreciate comments as to whether the above makes sense, or whether I have overlooked anything.

    Thanks and regards,
    Roy
    OS Dual Boot Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit & Windows 7 Pro With SP1 64 bit. (Intel Core i7 2600K Processor LGA1155-Asus P867 Pro Motherboard-GTX550 Ti DirectCU Graphics Card-Memory 8GB)

    Roy Whitethread

  2. #2
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Are these two separate physical hard drives, or partitions on a single drive?
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  3. #3
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    Hi bbearren,

    They are two separate physical hard drives.

    Please advise further.

    Thanks and regards,
    Roy
    OS Dual Boot Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit & Windows 7 Pro With SP1 64 bit. (Intel Core i7 2600K Processor LGA1155-Asus P867 Pro Motherboard-GTX550 Ti DirectCU Graphics Card-Memory 8GB)

    Roy Whitethread

  4. #4
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    If you already have D back upped to an external source then I would clone C: drive to D: drive and then restore your backup to C: drive. Check out link below:
    http://www.devhardware.com/c/a/Hardw...crium-Reflect/

  5. #5
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Whitethread View Post
    My OS is Win 7 Pro 32 bit.

    I am contemplating doing the following in order to transfer the contents of my C drive to drive D, and vice versa.

    I.Create an up to date image of my C drive on internal drive H. (I already have a complete backup of my D drive).

    2.Format C and D.

    3.Reverse the names of C and D.
    Steps 1. and 2. are fine, 3. is not necessary. What you need to do is swap the cables for the two drives after the imaging. Windows always puts boot information on drive 0. The system drive will automatically become drive C:, regardless of where it is located. Since you already have the boot info on drive 0 (your current C, swapping the drive cables will keep the system drive as drive 0 and you won't have to deal with BCD editing after you restore your image to that drive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Whitethread View Post
    4.Use my Win 7 repair disk to restore the system image to the renamed C drive.

    5.Restore the renamed D drive from the backup.

    The reason I want to do this is that I am running out of space on my D drive, whereas the C drive is comparatively empty.

    I would appreciate comments as to whether the above makes sense, or whether I have overlooked anything.

    Thanks and regards,
    Roy
    Swapping the drive cables will simplify the process.

    If the drives are close to the same size, that is. I don't use Windows imaging, I use a third party. What little knowledge I have of Windows imaging is that it won't restore the image of a large drive to a smaller drive, even though the used space is smaller than the capacity of the smaller drive. I may well be incorrect on this particular issue, though.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  6. #6
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    You don't have to swap cables. Just go into BIOS and change the hard disk boot order.

    Jerry

  7. #7
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Witalka View Post
    You don't have to swap cables. Just go into BIOS and change the hard disk boot order.

    Jerry
    The drive that has its cable plugged into drive 0 connector will always physically be drive 0. There are a number of scenarios that can confuse/corrupt the BIOS configuration, and the drive selected as drive 0 can easily revert to its physical drive designation, and a computer that won't boot.

    If one wishes to avoid such possibilities, simplify by making the designated drive 0 the physical drive 0 at the connector.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  8. #8
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    The only problem I have ever run into by selecting the drive to boot from in BIOS was one BIOS that tried to be helpful and permantly change the boot order when the boot from the selected drive failed because the drive took too long to initialize. Would have done the same if I had selected physical drive 0 as the boot drive.

    Jerry

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