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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    I have a Dell XPS 9000 with two hard drives. The main hard drive has the OS with a recovery partition. My problems started last week when my Internet was down due to a bad storm. I decided to do some much needed maintenance including a Disk Defrag and a Chkdsk. When I rebooted the chkdsk froze a 1%. I rebooted and tried again. Same issue. I rebooted a third time and tried to cancel the chkdsk, but the keyboard did not stop the chkdsk, it just went down to 1% and froze.
    Steps I have taken to fix the issue:

    1 - I went into the Recovery option at the time of boot and tried to run the chkdsk with no luck. I rebooted and the chkdsk actually worked but took quite a long time - I do have a large hard drive.
    2 - I tried to run the System File Checker with Administrative rights but it would stop at 1% and a say files were corrupt and mention a log file. If needed I can provide the file as I have no idea what it means.
    3. I tried SFC in Safe Mode and got the same error.
    4. I ran a Virus Scan and Trojan removal utility in the hopes my computer was infected but it was clean.
    5. I have been searching Google to no avail looking for a solution to this issue but nothing has come up to address the issue.
    6. Dell is a waste of time, they just want to run a the Recovery Option and call it a day. There must be a way to fix this.

    Any ideas what I can do about this? How can I run a SFC without an installation disk, just a Recovery Partition and Recovery Disks I burned when I received the computer. I could kick myself for not having a backup routine. Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    5 Star Lounger
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    For me when that happened it was indeed a bad sector or something similar on the disk. I was eventually able to map it out by partitioning around it. You say it got through once but that's it so the table sounds like its ok but my guess is that there is a bad spot on the disk and you indeed have some file corruption that can't be repaired because it can't properly read that area. That's only a guess but the system file checker works in a protected mode so there's not a lot that it can be if it doesn't work. Could also be a non-standard partition table but you didn't do anything out of the ordinary beforehand did you?

    Sounds like you can still boot and do everything you've done so far (with the exception of file checking) without a problem? If so you might want to take advantage of the Acronis True Image trial period to see if it can make an image or if it fails because of a drive read issue. If it succeeds then you have that in your back pocket and can take more radical measures to fix the problem and if it doesn't succeed or tells you it skipped something that was unreadable, you're probably looking at a reinstall on a new disk Run SpinRite at a low level on it also if you have it, after a successful image is made that is. Have a good backup of at least the data if unsuccessful at imaging in case SpinRite whacks the drive completely.

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    Good advice, although if I try to run another chkdsk, I suspect the same issue would occur. When you say "bad spot on the disk" could a defective hard drive be at issue?

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Run the diagnostic utility of the hard drives manufacturer for defects.
    You may also want to consider running checkdisk again, but this time from a bootable disk with a dos like command promt.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Rossmere View Post
    Run the diagnostic utility of the hard drives manufacturer for defects.
    You may also want to consider running checkdisk again, but this time from a bootable disk with a dos like command promt.
    Well the diagnostic utility for the hard drive turned up no problems. I then ran a full hardware scan with nothing turning up. I then ran the System Express Checker which gave me an error reading 0F00:133C Msg Disk - No Suitable Disk Media is Present. Then all hell broke loose. I tried to reboot but the system froze at the welcome screen. After several attempts, I was able to get in Safe Mode and repair my computer with System Restore (my registry was hosed thanks to that Dell Utility).

    By the way, that error reading indicates a memory issue or video issue. However, the diagnostic tests indicates all hardware is running properly. I have never seen anything like this before in my 15+ years of using computers. Any thoughts are appreciated.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Upload the log file that you mentioned.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
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  7. #7
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    I get a message saying I am not permitted to upload this kind of file. It is a long log file.

  8. #8
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    a zip file might work...[attachment=91038:CBS.zip]
    Attached Files Attached Files

  9. #9
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles D View Post
    I get a message saying I am not permitted to upload this kind of file. It is a long log file.
    Save it as a text file and try again. If it still doesn't upload, split it into two parts, and upload one at a time.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  10. #10
    New Lounger
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    I appreciate your patience.

  11. #11
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    Try this....
    Attached Files Attached Files

  12. #12
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    If you haven't created a system repair disk, do so. Go to Start > Help and Support, type "system repair disk" in the search box and hit Enter. Click on "Create a system repair disk" and follow the instructions.

    Boot from the system repair disk, open a command prompt, and type

    chkdisk c: /r

    and hit Enter. (notice the spaces between "chkdsk" and "c:" and "/r")

    If you have partitioned your hard drives, "C:" may not show as "C:" when booted into the repair disk. To find your "C:" drive in such a case, type

    c:

    and hit Enter. Your prompt will change to C:\>

    Type

    dir

    and hit Enter. Look at the resulting directory listing to see if it looks like your C: drive. If it doesn't, go to "D:" and repeat the above instructions. When you get to your CD/DVD drive, if it is empty, you will get a "device not ready" notice. If there is a CD or DVD in the drive, you will get the directory tree of that optical disk.

    When you find the repair disk label for your actual C: drive, use that drive letter in place of "c" in the chkdsk /r instruction.

    If it seems to freeze at 1%, just let it freeze. Chkdsk can take a very long time to run even when there are no file fragments or bad sectors, and can take even longer if it encounters files system problems and/or bad sectors.

    After it finishes C:, do the rest of your system. If you have partitioned your hard drives, chkdsk sees each partition as a separate hard drive.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  13. #13
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    I hope you've imaged or attempted to image by now. I would have seperated the hardware from the software by now so I clearly know what direction to go in.

  14. #14
    New Lounger
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    OK, chkdsk complete with no errors found. I have the System Restore Partition, I made System Restore disks and I created an image with the C:Partition using Macrium Reflect which did not allow me to image the recovery partition and utility partition. Windows 7 boots fine but I still get the same error message and CBS log when I try to run SFC. I don't understand how you can run System File Checker with just a Restore disk from Dell.

    A few more facts. I have a second internal hard drive. Fortunately, I had an unopened copy of Windows 7 which I installed on the D drive so I am dual booting two versions of Windows 7. At the time I was unable to boot into Windows 7 (Dell's version on C drive) which is why I did this. I eventually was able to repair the initial install of 7 on the C: drive.

    Windows 7 on the D drive runs flawlessly. I can run chkdsk and SFC. I really would like to get it down to one version of Windows 7. What do you guys suggest I do under the current circumstances?

  15. #15
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Boot your other Windows 7 DVD, choose the repair option and select the Dell installation of Windows 7 (the one that's giving you trouble) as the installation to repair.

    Open a command prompt, find the drive letter of your Dell installation (it may well not be recognized as "C:" by the DVD repair option), change to that drive, and run sfc /scannow from that drive.

    The system file checker should use the store from the DVD to replace any corrupted files, rather than the Windows installation on the hard drive.

    Your log showed errors in some files in the Winsxs folder, and that is the source used by sfc to repair system files. That, I beleive, is the root of your difficulty in running sfc scannow in the Dell installation; it can't find a clean file on your hard drive to replace a corrupted file.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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