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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    I'm not sure if this is a problem or not. When I boot up it appears that my internet connection starts before my firewall and anti virus kicks in. I'm saying this only on the basis of the order of the icons that appear in the tray. I've googled this question with very little success. Is there a way to make sure that the internet connection isn't established before the firewall and anti virus?

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    I had a similar questions some time ago and I emailed my firewall support and I was told that while the icon may not show the firewall was loaded into processes as fast as possible.. So they say...

    As far as AV goes, I don't think there is much of a problem there because you really can't get a virus unless you d/l something..

    But, that's my opinion and I'm sure there will be many more forthcoming...
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  3. #3
    5 Star Lounger
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    Since the firewall operates on the network connections, and thus interacts with the network software, the firewall cannot be started until the network has started.

    To avoid incoming attacks (outside software trying to break into your PC) you just need to ensure that the firewall runs before any server software (databases, web servers, etc.) start. Of course, if you configured the firewall to allow that server software to open the ports, then it doesn't matter whether the firewall runs before that software or not. Of course, the best way to guard yourself from incoming attacks is to place a router between your PC and your internet connection. Most routers have a built in firewall that is configured to not allow any incoming traffic. Sitting behind such a router the only thing you would have to be concerned with is the other computers on your home network, and as long as those are clean then you're OK.

    To avoid outgoing attacks (keyloggers, spyware, etc.) you need to ensure that the firewall runs before that software runs. Of course you AV software should hopefully find such software and disable it. Also, you need a firewall that by default disallows outgoing traffic - the firewall should pop up a dialog box asking permission for the software to access the internet.

    And as Banyrola pointed out, you only need the AV running before you access the internet either via your browser or email client. If you are really paranoid, you could run your browser and email client using a utility such as Drop My Rights (http://download.cnet.com/DropMyRight...-10722877.html).

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    Thanks guys....I feel better now...I do have a router and I'm also running drop my rights so I guess I was just being more paranoid than normal...

  5. #5
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Your router should have a hardware firewall as well as your software firewall and AV. I also do not see any problems. All my PC's act the same as you specify without any infections.
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  6. #6
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    If you are running Vista or Windows 7 the Windows firewall is activated very early in the boot process. If you run a third party firewall that properly registers and interfaces with Windows the Windows firewall will still be active for the very brief time period while the network is active and before the third party firewall is activated. Once the third party firewall is activated is takes over.

    Joe
    Joe

  7. #7
    2 Star Lounger
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    So much protection to choose from. Some free. Some expensive. but they all work the same way.

    OR DO THEY.

    I think not, and since no clue has been given the O.S. could easily be XP or even earlier,
    and even if it is later than XP the protection may not be suitably registered for Windows Firewall to fill in the "start-up gap".

    I know how my chosen protection (Comodo) works on my Laptop (XP Home) and I have no fears about a "start-up gap",
    but I have no confident expectation of how any other random protection and random O.S. might function.

    Alan

  8. #8
    4 Star Lounger
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    Just wanted to mention that on our home PCs running Avast! Free Edition anti-virus, the internet is inaccessible to us for about 20 seconds after Windows desktop appears, while Avast! updates itself online. Since our older PCs needed at least a couple of minutes before being fully usable, this slight delay for security purposes seems very acceptable. (We use an Intel Core2duo E6750/3.25GB RAM/Windows7 and a Core i3 540/3.25GB RAM/Win7/XP dual-boot.) Our laptop is an Intel P6100 dual-core/3GB RAM with Windows Security Essentials which seems to slow everything down just a little more compared to using Avast! Has anyone else noticed that WSE makes everything run slightly slower?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by starvinmarvin View Post
    Just wanted to mention that on our home PCs running Avast! Free Edition anti-virus, the internet is inaccessible to us for about 20 seconds after Windows desktop appears, while Avast! updates itself online. Since our older PCs needed at least a couple of minutes before being fully usable, this slight delay for security purposes seems very acceptable. (We use an Intel Core2duo E6750/3.25GB RAM/Windows7 and a Core i3 540/3.25GB RAM/Win7/XP dual-boot.) Our laptop is an Intel P6100 dual-core/3GB RAM with Windows Security Essentials which seems to slow everything down just a little more compared to using Avast! Has anyone else noticed that WSE makes everything run slightly slower?
    If you mean Microsoft Security Essentials then NO I have not noticed it being slower than others.

    Joe

  10. #10
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Cool

    You're Not paranoid.....they really are out to get you!

    For someone wanting the ultimate control over their internet connection, I suggest this:

    Go into your connections page and set up a shortcut to your connection. Windows will offer to put that shortcut on your desktop. Accept that option.
    From the desktop Shortcut you can either disable or enable your internet connection.

    Disable the connection before you shut down your computer and wait for all your security software to be fully active before RE-Enabling the internet connection, when you re-boot your computer.

    I use my Internet Connection shortcut a lot, like when I've shut down my AV program so I can install new software, or when I'm doing my HD maintenance and I've shut down ALL running programs. It's really handy to have your internet connection as close as your finger tips (mouse).

    On my Acer One Netbook, I have three options for an internet connection.
    1. LAN, cable connection
    2. Wireless G, built in wireless connection
    3. Wireless N, external wireless (USB) connection
    * I have not yet activated the dial-up connection on this computer. That would be #4.

    All are activated from desktop shortcut Icons, so I can pick the connection I want, depending on where I am at the time.
    Or, I can have NO connection to the internet at all. It's totally up to me.

    Cheers Mates!
    Dr Who
    Last edited by DrWho; 2011-01-21 at 13:41.
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

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  11. #11
    New Lounger
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    shortcut to disable i'net connection

    Quote Originally Posted by DrWho View Post
    You're Not paranoid.....they really are out to get you!

    For someone wanting the ultimate control over their internet connection, I suggest this:

    Go into your connections page and set up a shortcut to your connection. Windows will offer to put that shortcut on your desktop. Accept that option.
    From the desktop Shortcut you can either disable or enable your internet connection.

    Disable the connection before you shut down your computer and wait for all your security software to be fully active before RE-Enabling the internet connection, when you re-boot your computer.

    I use my Internet Connection shortcut a lot, like when I've shut down my AV program so I can install new software, or when I'm doing my HD maintenance and I've shut down ALL running programs. It's really handy to have your internet connection as close as your finger tips (mouse).

    On my Acer One Netbook, I have three options for an internet connection.
    1. LAN, cable connection
    2. Wireless G, built in wireless connection
    3. Wireless N, external wireless (USB) connection
    * I have not yet activated the dial-up connection on this computer. That would be #4.

    All are activated from desktop shortcut Icons, so I can pick the connection I want, depending on where I am at the time.
    Or, I can have NO connection to the internet at all. It's totally up to me.

    Cheers Mates!
    Dr Who
    I like your suggestion, but I can't find the "connections page" that allows this.
    can you be more specific for windows 7?

  12. #12
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    I just turn off my WiFi Radio Signal, either at the Tray Icon or from my Keyboard Function Key. Then only turn on the WiFi when I want to connect for some reason. Auto-updaters don't like this setup, but all else is fine, and boot times are a bit faster.
    -- Bob Primak --

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