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  1. #1
    iNET Interactive
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    CES report: Far more than tablets and 3-D TV




    TOP STORY

    CES report: Far more than tablets and 3-D TV


    By Michael Lasky

    Windows takes a back-row seat to everything Apple or tablet.

    Or so it would seem. But beyond the hype, there was a wealth of interesting technology on display at CES.

    The full text of this column is posted at WindowsSecrets.com/2010/01/20/01 (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    USB 3.0 too little too late

    but the marketing gurus will still try to shove it down our throats.

    USB 2.0 is more than sufficient for the vast majority of USB devices. For devices needing greater bandwidth, existing eSATA or FireWire connections can easily handle the load.

    Since SATA is already built into nearly every computing device with a hard drive it is cheap to implement eSATA. There are no electronics involved, just a different connector. You can add eSATA to any desktop PC already running SATA for about US$10. And, eSATA runs at the same speed as SATA. Further, it has become common to build combination USB 2.0/eSATA ports into notebooks. I personally backup my notebook to an external eSATA drive.

    The other high bandwidth use is video. eSATA shines here too, but professional and serious amatuer videographers have settled on Firewire. In addition to speed, Firewire includes networking capabilities to control multiple Firewire devices from a single point. You'll find Firewire routinely built into video related devices currently on the market.

    I'm not knocking USB 3.0's capabilities. I am simply saying it is a technology that came to market too late to be relevant. But we will still see it hyped because the marketing folks are trying to recover all those otherwise lost R&D costs.
    Jim Johnson
    Michigan's Lake Superior region
    How much snow do we have now?
    Visit Agate Reef

  3. #3
    5 Star Lounger
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    Netbooks, notebooks and tablets - aren't they just small laptops?

    If there is a difference, a definition would be helpful.

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    The Ion Audio Book Saver looks like what I've been wishing for: a way to read the books I've collected, but now find the print is too small and/or the contrast is too low to comfortably read. As a PDF file, I can expand the text size to a comfortable level, and perhaps even have the Acrobat software read it to me.
    I was considering using a DV camera to transmit the book page to computer screen, zoom in and try to coordinate the book, camera and computer in a reasonable fashion. The Book Saver sounds much more convenient. This should not violate any copyright laws, should it? I suspect many other older folks, whose vision is failing, will welcome a product like this if it is reasonably priced and easy to use. Especially for people with uncorrectable vision problems will welcome this device.

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