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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    Seven steps to a well–set-up machine...

    The article should include this step for all new home computer setups:

    Create the Recovery CD/DVD as recommended by the vendor.

    On the first day when you setup a new laptop/PC, locate the vendor's utility for creating "Recovery" or "Factory Restore" CDs/DVDs.

    Down the road, these CDs/DVDs are important to have. If they are not available you may need to purchase them from the PC manufacturer, at a cost of $20 or more.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    Excellent review of windows 7 setup. I'd add an 8th step - Go to ninite.com and add those applications you wish to install that are available on this site. Saves a lot of time.
    Jim

  3. #3
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    Woody,

    Excellent article!

    I agree with everything you advised, except for the very last one. I would never put my passwords on the internet. That allows a hacker or someone in the company to more easily steal all of your passwords. LastPass is a high-value target for hackers and criminals. I would recommend Bruce Schneier's PasswordSafe (http://www.schneier.com/passsafe.html) or RoboForm (http://www.roboform.com/). Both of these store your passwords in a database on your *local* PC. Now a criminal has to break into your PC to get your passwords.

    I would add the following. First you should make a statement about the choice between MS Office or Open Office, since Cousin Bill may be a student and need this for homework.

    I would also setup common bookmarks in his browser, like email or RSS reader or gaming site.

    Peace,
    Randy

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    Jim,

    Awesome site. I've got to remember this when I'm setting up a new system.

    Very cool,
    Randy

  5. #5
    Lounger
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    Another biggie missing: ninite.com . A quick and convenient way to grab all those useful-but-unobtrusive utilities at the same time.

    Just watch out for some of the more complex programs: if, for instance, you're dead set against Winamp installing its own bothersome ripping-and-burning engine, you're not going to want it to install silently.

  6. #6
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobAld View Post
    The article should include this step for all new home computer setups:

    Create the Recovery CD/DVD as recommended by the vendor.

    On the first day when you setup a new laptop/PC, locate the vendor's utility for creating "Recovery" or "Factory Restore" CDs/DVDs.

    Down the road, these CDs/DVDs are important to have. If they are not available you may need to purchase them from the PC manufacturer, at a cost of $20 or more.
    RobAid, Welcome to the new Lounge!

    Read the threads pertaining to Imaging in the Security and Backup forum. This Recovery DVD you mention will only take the PC back to the factory condition without any of your custimizations or apps, etc. Making Up To Date Images will (in less than 15 minutes) take you back to exactly where you were when you made the Image, including all custimizations and apps, etc. Yes a Recovery DVD may be important on a new PC before you start making any changes, but Images will save your bacon later, after you have spent hours setting things up just the way you want them.

    I also state make Up To Date Images. I recreate my Image when ever a change takes place (new app, upgrade, etc) or every couple of weeks, which ever I feel is necessary. This way when I screw something up badly (I like to "play" with my PC OS and new apps, etc) it only takes a few minutes to get back where I was. Spend a $100 and get a 1TB USB Ext HD to store your Images on. I have dozens of different Images and still have over half the Ext HD space available. I simply put descriptive names and dates on each file so I know what Image to use.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    Hi RobAld,

    Ted's recommendation is the way to go to protect yourself from having to return to the factory fresh state. It eliminates a lot of rework. The real value in the vendor's recovery DVD set is if you decide to sell or donate your computer at some time in the future. Setting it to the factory fresh state would be the way to go in that situation.

    Also, if your computer has a recovery partition, you could image that separately and then delete the partition from your hard drive to recover the disk space for your own use. It might not hurt to have a second set of recovery DVDs tucked away somewhere if you do eliminate the recovery partition.
    Last edited by Deadeye81; 2011-01-29 at 10:17.
    Deadeye81

    "We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give." Sir Winston Churchill

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