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  1. #1
    Bronze Lounger
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    Drive not accessible

    My OS is Win 7 Pro 32 bit.

    My D drive was working perfectly yesterday, but for some unknown reason when I tried to open it today I was told unable to access the drive and that I should format it. When I tried to format it I was told the format could not be completed and that I should check the disk is not read only. (How?). When I tried to use the command chkdsk D: /r I was told the type of file system is RAW, and that chkdsk is not available for RAW drives.

    HELP!!

    What can I do about this? (I have everything on D backed up).

    Please advise asap.

    Thanks and regards,
    Roy Whitethread

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Roy,

    What type of physical device is your drive D:? D: is usually the CD/DVD drive. If it's showing as RAW and was previously working something has probably happened to track 0 if it is a spinning disk.
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  3. #3
    Bronze Lounger
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    Smile

    Hi Retired Geek.

    Drive D is an additional internal hard drive. (My CD/DVD drive is Drive E).

    I am pleased to say I solved the formatting problem by using Disk Management to delete the volume, after which I recreated it as a Simple NTFS volume. I then used the chkdsk option to scan for and fix file system errors and attempt recovery of bad sectors, and no problems were found.

    I have no idea why the file system was changed to RAW, but all's well that ends well. (Famous last words).

    Best regards,
    Roy

  4. #4
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I would change the drive letters around and make your CD/DVD drive D, instead of E.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Why make the CD/DVD D:? I have been running windows for years with an E: CD/DVD and a D: hard drive partition. Changing drive letters also runs the risk of registry entries pointing to the wrong drive.

    Jerry

  6. #6
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I also use the D Drive as a disk partition. My C Drive is OS and apps, D Drive is Data drive (D for Data) seems to make sence. My CD/DVD is actually F on my system. I had originally used E as a Page File drive, but elliminated that a while back and put the Page File back onto C. E is unallocated for now.
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  7. #7
    New Lounger
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    It's just a matter of choice, but I have changed my optical drives to R: for the DVD reader, V: for the Virtual Drive and W: for the DVD Writer. This way any other drive added to the system for backup, temp storage, Flash etc. can have following letters.

  8. #8
    5 Star Lounger
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    I always label my CD/DVD/BluRay drives starting with Z: and working my way down. Currently I have Z: down to T: on my desktop. My laptop, alas, has only Z:

    I have no idea why the file system was changed to RAW,
    I would run a self test on the drive. If it is a Seagate drive (or you have a Seagate drive) SeaTools (from the Seagate web site) will run various drive tests. If it is from other other company perhaps they provide a similar tool. It could be that your drive is about to give out and the self-test should catch that.

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