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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    XP: Error on resume from hibernation

    Sometimes, but by no means always, following a resumption from hibernation, I am unable to start any new processes. Programs which were running prior to hibernation can still be used and work OK, but if I try to start anything new I get a pop up box with "Windows cannot access the specified device or drive....you may not have the appropriate permissions", and the application will not start. The only way out of it is to reboot, usually requiring a hard power-off reboot, because a soft restart attempt can also result in the above message. Following the reboot, everything is back to normal.

    It would seem that something is not being restored properly from the hibernation file? I have not been able to find a pattern, but it is more likely to occur following a longer period of hibernation, e.g. overnight. Hibernation followed by a resume in only an hour or so does not result in the problem.

    I have run scans for malware and viruses, and they found nothing. There are a lot of hits in google on the above messages, which apparently can also occur in Vista and Win 7, but I could find no satisfactory explanation or remedy. I am running XP SP3, fully up to date. Can anyone help?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    MS Support:How to determine whether a computer is using ACPI features


    Hibernation and standby require a system BIOS that supports ACPI or the former APM specification. To avoid problems, review the system documentation or see the manufacturer's Web site for information about how to determine whether the firmware is compliant and up to date. Updated firmware is especially important when you use the ACPI functionality.



    To determine whether the computer is using ACPI features, follow these steps:
    1. Click Start, click Run, type devmgmt.msc, and then click OK.
    2. In the Device Manager window, expand Computer.
    3. If the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC option is displayed, your computer is using ACPI features.

      If the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC option is not displayed, your computer does not support ACPI features.
    social.technet.microsoft.com: XP Pro Resume from Hibernation Problem
    check your BIOS for power management features, there must be a option with ACPI ver. set it to 3.0 so that all your devices can get a updated ACPI tables included, if possible update your BIOS and check your power supply, many times with XP some Power supplies go incompatible after certain no. of uses... !

    2nd option : you can also try restoring defaults in BIOS , and then setting S1 and S3 POS types...

  3. #3
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    For years, the internet has been awash in complaints concerning Hibernation and Sleep. I just make sure that both are disabled and then have NO problems with them. Unless you're running the Server version of windows, it was never designed to run 24x7. There are things Windows needs to do during a shutdown and restart that just doesn't get done unless you shut down your PC.
    PC's that absolutely need to be on all night, like to receive faxes, should be rebooted manually at a certain time each day.

    Also, getting rid of Hibernation, removes that HUGE hiberfil.sys (?) file from the root directory.

    That's just a personal observation.

    Good Luck,
    the Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  4. #4
    3 Star Lounger
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    I totally disagree with DrWho's comments. Hibernation works perfectly well, as it was intended to, if it is used properly. It means that I can power off my computer overnight (turn it off at the wall switch, total power down), turn it on again the next morning, and have the system up and running in a few seconds, rather than having to wait for a cold reboot. It also means that if I am interrupted and must leave the computer for an extended period, I can save, hibernate, and later resume at exactly where I was. I use a program called Quick Shutdown, which enabled hibernation with a quick keyboard shortcut, rather than the tedious Start -> Shutdown sequence. There's no question of running 24/7, and I never leave the computer running overnight; there is a fundamental difference between running 24/7 and how often you reboot, and of course I do reboot when necessary. The hiberfil.sys file is of no consequence on a reasonably large drive; in my case it is two gigabytes on a 65 GB partition, where only 14 GB is in use anyway.

    A couple of hints on managing the hiberfil.sys file: (1) ensure it is always in one piece and not fragmented. (2) disable it prior to running defragmentation on the disk or partition where it is, and enable it again afterwards. (3) exclude it from virus and malware checking.

    My initial problem with resuming from hibernation was due to a known issue (but not known to me, at the time) with the Online Armor firewall. Since upgrading this to a new version, the problem has ceased.

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