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  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    Can my computer belong to me?

    Sure, Win7 breaks less than XP did, but Microsoft has really messed up on security. The "Ownership" and "Permissions" are CONSTANTLY prohibiting me from using my computer. I have wasted HOURS and HOURS of time trying to do things that I could do in seconds in XP. Why in heaven's name did not the geniuses at Microsoft allow ME to access ALL of the files on MY computer when I am running as ADMINISTRATOR. To lock me out of my own computer is simply dumber than dirt! Is there any way to run in "I'll take my chances" mode with Win7? Is there any way that I can regain the full use of my computer without wiping my hard disk and installing "buggy" old XP or endlessly geeky Linux?

    My new computer with factory Win7 is not worth much more than a doorstop at this time. I have programmed computers since way before the IBM PC existed, but Microsoft's current idiocy has me thinking Apple for the first time. Is there any way for me to be the owner of this computer?
    Last edited by Just Plain Fred; 2011-03-11 at 08:40.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    Bob,

    Ubuntu Linux isn't very geeky, works well, installs easily, has automatic updates, is pretty nice. I have one pc running it in my office, mostly for the experience and for running as an ftp server. It's been years since I worked in UNIX (and then, in AIX) so I wanted to keep my hand in, at least a little bit.

    You do know that Apple Mac OS is Unix, right? Everytime you install a new program, you need to type in the administrator password.

    Microsoft is FINALLY trying to protect it's users, each new os has been better than the last (well, maybe not ME), usability and security-wise. I run Win7 on my main pc and have very few security issues, while running AVG Internet Security and MBAM Pro to help protect myself.

    You could change ownership of all files on the C: Drive, but I think that would be a bad idea - Windows could break if ownership isn't set properly - plus, when updates are applied, the ownership might go right back to what M$ wants it to be.

    By the way, I started programming professionally on the Univac 494 system, using a language called Spurt - Univac's form of assembler, back in 1973.

    Randy C

  3. #3
    Silver Lounger
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    Bob, my computor belongs to me. Yours can too. Go to the Start and type in UAC. It will give you somewhere to start and change the User Account Control ( UAC ). I hardly ever get a dialog asking me to allow or not a move that I initiate. Let me know if this is enough.

    Have a nice evening. . . ..Jean.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    I own the mechanical and electrical pieces

    of my PC, but I don't own Windows, and neither do any of us. I paid for a license to use it, but I don't in any way, shape, or form own it, but don't take my word for it. Read the EULA.

    Having said that, I do use the software in ways that Microsoft does not support, but it doesn't actually break the EULA, and Microsoft doesn't actaully say that I can't use it in some of the ways that I do, only that they don't support using it in other than a standard configuration.

    But I, for one, don't really mind a popup asking me if I want software from an unknown source to be installed on my computer from an internet address I haven't even visited. When I answer in the negative, the software doesn't get installed, and I consider that a good thing. YMMV.

    I have noticed after the SP-1 update that when I'm logged onto an account in the Administrators Group, I get fewer "confirmation" popups than I got before. But I routinely run from a standard user account, and I seldom do things from my standard user accounts that would invoke the UAC. That's what my account in the Administrators Group is for.

    Perhaps I'm overly fixated on organization, but I use different accounts to perform differnt types of tasks. For example, I use one standard user account for all things financial, and I don't do any financial activity from any other account. I balance my checkbook, do my taxes, etc. all from that account, and that's all I use that account for.

    It helps me stay focused on the task at hand. But my main point is that UAC doesn't get in my way. When I'm monkeying around with the innards of Windows, I want to be asked if I know what I'm doing. I don't mind the opportunity for a do-over before the change I'm trying to make becomes permanent. I do keep up to date drive images, but UAC helps keep me from having to use them regularly.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  5. #5
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    Try Take Ownership, from here: http://www.blogsdna.com/2173/add-tak...-windows-7.htm

    It will easily remove the dumb access restrictions to files that showed up, first on Vista, and now still plague Windows 7.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    There is another way to take ownership of particular file or folder: (the how to break your system method)
    Right click on the file or folder in question, select properties. Go to the security tab, highlight "everyone" and select edit. When the new menu opens, remove "everyone" from the list.






    How to Take Ownership and Grant Permissions in Windows Vista (same as W7)
    Easier Way to Take Ownership and Grant Access Files or Directories in Vista
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2011-03-11 at 06:58.

  7. #7
    5 Star Lounger
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    You can run as part of the administrator's group but not as Administrator with your user name, however, Windows 7 does have a user called Administrator that truly has full and complete privileges to everything on the machine. This user is prebuilt and is disabled. If you are running the Pro or ultimate versions of windows you can go in and enable this user, assign a password and login and run as administrator.
    THIS IS A BAD IDEA.

    Microsoft has FINALLY come to their senses and decided that in most cases it is better for a normal user to NOT run with these elevated privileges. This is something that has been implemented in Linux for many years. Now that MS has implemented it people are talking about switching to Linux.......???.........

  8. #8
    Star Lounger
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    Thanks to all for your responses to my questions. They have given me several avenues to investigate. Thanks to mercyh for informing me that when Windows 7 says that I am running as "Administrator", that I am actually being lied to. That tip alone helps me make sense of what I see happening. In my previous experiences with Windows, when they said that I was Administrator, the OS acted as if I was the Administrator. Learning that Bill's Latest and Greatest denies me ever being the actual Administrator of my computer system (unless, needless to say, they are paid more money) tells me the real story about what happens when the control freaks run amuck. I have used Bill's OS since the days of MS-DOS 1.0, but from my personal point of view, the Microsoft Corporation has "improved" the Windows OS so effectively that I will be shopping elsewhere for my next OS. So, I plan to see if Steve Jobs has set himself up as the only person who can be allowed to configure my Mac. If Apple does not yet demand extra money from the user to allow them to be the real Administrator of the computer they own, I'll probably go with them. If they have gone down the control freak road too, Ubuntu here I come! Goodbye and good riddance to Microsoft! And when the new cars come with factory installed Auto-Drive (because, of course, the engineers know how to drive better than you do), I'll be shopping for the old "manual drive" models. 'Just old fashioned, I guess.....

  9. #9
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Spafford View Post
    So, I plan to see if Steve Jobs has set himself up as the only person who can be allowed to configure my Mac.
    From everything I've heard, he has. My brother is a Mac devotee and has been for years. According to him, things are either very easy on a Mac, or they are impossible. I've used a Mac on occaission, but I'd never buy one. I've also tried Linux on a couple of occaissions, but I don't really care for it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Spafford View Post
    If Apple does not yet demand extra money from the user to allow them to be the real Administrator of the computer they own, I'll probably go with them.
    One doesn't own the software on a Mac anymore than one owns the software on a PC. One merely owns a license to use the software.

    As for the default Administrator account, it's a simple matter to open the management console, go to Users and enable the Windows default Administrator account. It's also a simple matter to disable UAC. I don't, but it is a simple process.

    When I first started using Windows 7 and discovered that I couldn't move the Program Files folder to a separate partition and have that location set as the default program installation location as I had done in XP, I took out my digital scalpel.

    I carved up Windows 7 and put it together the way I want it. The Windows OS is on a small partition, Program Files default location is on a separate, larger partition, and Users default location is on still another separate partition.

    Microsoft doesn't support my configuration, but then I don't need them to support it. It is quite stable and reliable, and I make drive images for backup on a routine basis. Service Pack 1 installed on my setup without a whimper.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  10. #10
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    With you being in the administrator group and not being "THE Administrator" on a Windows 7 PC, it is very much like what Unix & Linux based systems have been all along. On those you aren't "THE Administrator" unless you log in as "root". See bbearren's post #9 about activating "THE Administrator" account.

    Joe
    Last edited by JoeP517; 2011-03-18 at 12:32.

  11. #11
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeperez View Post
    With you being in the administrator group and not being "THE Administrator" on a Windows 7 PC, it is very much like what Unix & Linux based systems have been all along. On those you are "THE Administrator" unless you log in as "root".

    Joe
    Joe, did you mean to say "On those you aren't "THE Administrator" unless you log in as "root"?

    It's been a while since I played with Linux, but I think that's the way I remember it. Of course, I could very well be wrong.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  12. #12
    5 Star Lounger
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    I think there is some confusion over the Admin account and being in the administrators group. If you are in the Administrators group, you are an admin and have all the same privileges the administrator account has. Its the UAC that blocks attempts to install things or make OS level changes. If you don't like that, drop the slider down to never alert. But I don't recommend it. The reason its there is to alert you when malicious software is attempting to do something you don't want to be done. I have never been restricted on my Win 7 machines from performing any action I needed to.

    The local Administrator account is disabled because its one of the system accounts and has the same SID on every Windows PC, and of course is well known by anyone who does not have your best interests in mind when it comes to attempting access to your computer. There was a time when best practice was to rename the account, but the SID issue makes that a waste of time. The Admin account is only really used when the OEM is doing imaging or when using Sysprep to create an image for an enterprise environment. It is best left disabled.
    Chuck

  13. #13
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    THE Administrator

    It has been my experience that there are indeed a couple of capabilities THE Administrator has that other members of the Administrators Group do not have.

    I always enable THE Administrator account long enough to give it a password. There are exploits that will allow the account to be enabled if the machine is running under an Administrators Group account.

    Which is just another of many reasons that I routinely run as a standard user.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    Joe, did you mean to say "On those you aren't "THE Administrator" unless you log in as "root"?

    It's been a while since I played with Linux, but I think that's the way I remember it. Of course, I could very well be wrong.
    Oops.
    You are correct. I fixed it. Thanks.

    Joe

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    It has been my experience that there are indeed a couple of capabilities THE Administrator has that other members of the Administrators Group do not have.

    I always enable THE Administrator account long enough to give it a password. There are exploits that will allow the account to be enabled if the machine is running under an Administrators Group account.

    Which is just another of many reasons that I routinely run as a standard user.
    Hence the need for "run as administrator".

    Joe

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