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  1. Lounger
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    Exclamation Drive C: failing - How to copy OS to a new drive?

    After logging in I receive the dreaded "Windows detected a hard disk problem" and as luck would have it, it is the C: drive which contains the operating system. Although I can use the system, I periodically get the "Windows detected a hard disk problem" message and everything is running real slow.

    I have another identical drive D: installed on the computer that contains my user data (already backed up). What can I do to move the operating system to the other drive before the C drive dies entirely.

    What I have attempted so far. Using Norton Ghost 15.0 I copied my C: drive to my D: drive using options

    Copy My Hard Drive (Copy all existing files, programs, and settings from one hard drive to another)
    Check source for file system errors
    Check destination for file system errors
    Set drive active
    Copy MBR

    After the copy completed successfully I shut down the computer and moved the SATA cable from the original drive to the new drive. Upon booting, I get the error Boot MGR is missing. Using the original DVD I did a repair and then the system booted to the login screen. It accepted my password but instead of logging me in normally, it displayed the building profile message. After running for a long time the screen turns to a light blue. In the lower right corner of the screen is displayed
    Windows 7
    Build 7600
    This copy of Windows is not Genuine.
    It hangs there with no response other than the mouse is still active. The screen is blank with the exception of the above message.

    OS: WIN7 Ultimate 64 bit
    Dell Studio XPS with 12 gig RAM and dual 1 TB drives.

    Any help will be sincerely appreciated as I need to get this copied before the C drive dies entirely. I have spent a year getting applications installed and tweaked (Apache server, MySQL, PHP, etc.) and I don't want to start from scratch.

    Dell has sent me a replacement drive with the OS installed and it operates OK so I am confident the Motherboard is OK.

    Thanks,
    Steve

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  3. Administrator
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    You can use Ghost to create an image of your current C:. Then, remove it, install the new drive, and restore the image using Ghost.

    If you really want to use D:, you need to clone C: not copy. I don't know if Ghost is capable of that.

    Joe

  4. Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    You can use BootIt Next Generation (fully functional 30-day free trial download) to make a byte for byte image of your failing drive and then restore that image to your good drive. It's tiny (it will run from a floppy drive) and thorough. It will also run from CD or USB, or it can be installed in its own 8MB partition.

    BootIt NG will work for what you need; I've done it a number of times. BootIt NG will also do a byte for byte bootable copy from one partiton to another.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2011-03-14 at 20:11.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
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  5. Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    You can use BootIt Next Generation (fully functional 30-day free trial download) to make a byte for byte image of your failing drive and then restore that image to your good drive. It's tiny (it will run from a floppy drive) and thorough. It will also run from CD or USB, or it can be installed in its own 8MB partition.

    BootIt NG will work for what you need; I've done it a number of times. BootIt NG will also do a byte for byte bootable copy from one partiton to another.
    Thanks for your quick reply. I'll try BootItNG but since the C drive is on its last leg, I want to make sure I take maximum advantage of the up time. A couple of questions:

    Which function do I use in BootItNG?
    Can I go directly from my current C drive to my D drive instead of copying to a USB drive and then to my new drive (SATA to SATA is much faster than SATA to USB).

  6. Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve1951 View Post
    Thanks for your quick reply. I'll try BootItNG but since the C drive is on its last leg, I want to make sure I take maximum advantage of the up time. A couple of questions:

    Which function do I use in BootItNG?
    Can I go directly from my current C drive to my D drive instead of copying to a USB drive and then to my new drive (SATA to SATA is much faster than SATA to USB).
    Yes, you can copy one partition to another. You'll use the "Work with partitions" button after BootIt NG has booted up. That will bring up a screen that has your drives listed on the left side (by number, drive 0, drive 1). Drive 0 will be displayed by default. The partition structure will appear in the center pane. Click on the partition you wish to copy to highlight it.

    On the right side are several buttons; you'll want to use "Copy". Click on Copy. At the bottom of the screen the message "Paste pending for [partition]" will appear. Go back to the left side, click the radio button by the drive you want to paste to. That drive's partition table will now be displayed in the center pane. Click the partition you wish to paste the copy to, and then on the right hand side again, click "Paste". You will be asked if you want a byte-for-byte validation; I recommend Yes.

    Keep in mind that this is a byte for byte copy and validation, so don't get impatient, and don't stop the process.

    You said Dell, which means that the BCD store may well be on the recovery partition. You may need to edit the BCD store to get your new drive to boot. And since the BCD store is on the failing drive, you'll also need to copy that partition to the same position on the new drive. Partition 0 is probably the Dell Utilities, partition 1 is probably the Recovery partition, and partition 2 is probably your OS partition. What all this means is that you should probably replicate your "failing" drive to your new drive completely, if you do indeed have a Recovery partition.

    You can use BootIt NG to find the BCD store. Highlight a partition and click "Properties", then click on the button "BCD Edit". If the BCD store is on that partition, it will open; if not, BootIt NG will tell you that there's no BCD store. Click the next partition and do the same. There is only one BCD store on the drive.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2011-03-14 at 21:40. Reason: additional information
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
    Unleash Windows

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to bbearren For This Useful Post:

    Steve1951 (2011-03-14)

  8. Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbearren View Post
    And since the BCD store is on the failing drive, you'll also need to copy that partition to the same position on the new drive. Partition 0 is probably the Dell Utilities, partition 1 is probably the Recovery partition, and partition 2 is probably your OS partition. What all this means is that you should probably replicate your "failing" drive to your new drive completely, if you do indeed have a Recovery partition.
    I do have a recovery partition. So BootItNG copies partitions and not complete drives. To get Utilities, Recovery and OS will I need to copy 3 partitions individually? I'm showing my ignorance of operating systems here - Most of my experience is web design, PHP, Javascript and etc. You state I'll need to copy that partition to the same position on the new drive. I'm assuming that BootItNG takes care of that for me or do I manually need to create these partitions?

    One last item - I've read the Getting Started Guide and it seems to indicate that I can't just download and install BootItNG. I need to create an ISO image on a CD or DVD (my computer doesn't have a floppy). Is the ISO image a requirement?

    Thanks for your patience. Hopefully I can help someone in the future in my area of expertise.

  9. Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve1951 View Post
    I do have a recovery partition. So BootItNG copies partitions and not complete drives. To get Utilities, Recovery and OS will I need to copy 3 partitions individually? I'm showing my ignorance of operating systems here - Most of my experience is web design, PHP, Javascript and etc. You state I'll need to copy that partition to the same position on the new drive. I'm assuming that BootItNG takes care of that for me or do I manually need to create these partitions?

    One last item - I've read the Getting Started Guide and it seems to indicate that I can't just download and install BootItNG. I need to create an ISO image on a CD or DVD (my computer doesn't have a floppy). Is the ISO image a requirement?

    Thanks for your patience. Hopefully I can help someone in the future in my area of expertise.
    Yes, you will need to burn the ISO to a CD, and boot from it. You can work directly from the CD, no need to install. If, in any of these procedures you see a checkbox on one of the BootIt NG screens that says "Data only" (you shouldn't but just in case), be sure to remove the check and leave the checkbox blank. Those come up on some of the operations, but I don't redall that they do in the partition creation or partition copy work that you'll be doing. Also, the SATA cables need to be in their original positions; failing drive as drive 0, target drive as drive 1. We'll switch after completion.

    The easiest way to create the right size partitions is to let the Copy process get it started for you. You'll need to delete the partitioning from the target drive first (highlight a partition, then click the Delete button, then highlight the next, Delete, til they're all gone), then create one big full-size partition and choose HPFS/NTFS as the file system. BootIt NG won't actually format NTFS (it leaves that for Windows), but it will faithfully Copy NTFS formatting when it copies a partition that's formatted NTFS. The partition creation process itself doesn't take long at all.

    You should copy the partitions in order, (I'm assuming Dell Utilities, Recovery, OS). When you Paste the Dell Utilities partition you want it in the same position, on the first partition on the new drive (if that is indeed where it is), which so far will be the only partition on the new drive.

    BootIt NG will give you the complete partition of the same size as the original, with whatever space that was not needed left as free space after the copied partition. BootIt NG won't copy to free space, so you will need to create another partition, and the simplest way to accomplish that is to make it the same size as the second partition you need to copy, so write those numbers (for the Recovery partition) down when you're looking at the partition table of the failing drive. The numbers are in MB.

    When you click on the "Create" button, you'll get an option of the smallest possible size and the largest (which is whatever free space is left). In the size box, just type in the same size as the next partition you want to copy. Choose HPFS/NTFS for a file system and the copy process will take care of that by copying the formatting when it copies the second partition.

    After you have created that second partition on the new drive, copy the second partition from the failing drive to it. After that copy and validation process is complete, create a partition for your OS (which is probably the rest of the drive, unless you have done some partition work yourself), select HPFS/NTFS for the file system again, and after the partition creation process is complete, copy the OS partition from your failing drive to the new drive.

    And again, BootIt NG will copy the formatting as well as all the bytes. And remember when you're copying these partitions, it's byte for byte and not screaming along, so just be patient, and don't stop the process. It's also copying the empty spaces and laying down the formatting.

    If you have to edit the BCD store, I can help you do that with BootIt NG as well.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2011-03-14 at 23:47. Reason: clarity, I hope
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
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  10. Lounger
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    I have the ISO CD created and have booted BootIt NG. On HD 0 (the failing drive) there are 3 partitions, DellUtility-0, RECOVERY-1 and OS-2. I have deleted all partitions on HD 1 and created one large partition on HD 1. If I highlight DellUtility-0, the only options available are Delete, Image and Properties. Obviously I can't use copy if it is not highlighted. DellUtility-0 is Bootable: FAT16, Size 39 MB, Cluster Size 2048 bytes with *Warning* File system ends at LBA 80321.

    How can I copy it or do I need to copy it?

    The BCD is in RECOVERY-1.

  11. Lounger
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    Another question - Above you stated I need to "create one big full-size partition and choose HPFS/NTFS as the file system" on the destination drive. In reading the instructions for BootIt NG, it states I can only paste into free space but since I created one large partition, there is no free space available.

  12. Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    My bad...

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve1951 View Post
    Another question - Above you stated I need to "create one big full-size partition and choose HPFS/NTFS as the file system" on the destination drive. In reading the instructions for BootIt NG, it states I can only paste into free space but since I created one large partition, there is no free space available.
    I use drive images for backup, and I'm much more familiar with that routine. I'm sorry about that.

    The Copy button will stay grayed out unless there is free space on a drive somewhere, because the Paste function only works in free space, as you noted (No need to Copy if there's nowhere to Paste).

    Go back to your target drive and Delete that partition. Then when you return to the failing drive and highlight the Dell Utilities partition, the Copy button won't be greyed out. Copy, change drives, then highlight the free space and Paste to the target drive. Then continue without the incorrect partition creation steps. The partitions will be created in the correct sizes by the Copy function.

    Again, I'm sorry about the mixup.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2011-03-15 at 12:07.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
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  13. Lounger
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    I deleted the partition on the destination drive and now the copy button is highlighted when the RECOVERY-1 and OS-2 partitions are selected but not when the DellUtility-0 partition is selected. Possibly it has something to do with that partition being formatted as FAT16.

    I have successfully copied the RECOVERY-1 partition and now I am in the process of copying the OS-2 partition (this will take a long, long time). Since I can't copy the DellUtility-0 partition, I'll attempt to boot without it.

    Anything else I need to do before attempting to boot with the new drive?

    Again - thank you very much for your help.

  14. Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    As far as the FAT 16 Dell Utilities, perhaps it something in the Copy function; I know that BootIt NG will "Image" a FAT 16 partition. But no matter, we can work around that.

    The BCD store will have to be edited, because it probably points to the third partition (partition 2) on the drive for the OS partition, and will need to be edited to point to the second partition (partition 1) on the drive.

    Once the OS partition is copied, you'll need to open the BCD store in the Recovery partition as you did before, and this time you'll click the Edit button.

    On the left side is a column of values in the BCD store. We're only interested in a couple of them. The first one we're interested in is "Description". Highlight "Description" and click on the "Edit" button at the bottom. "Description" is the name you give your OS. You can name it whatever you like; Windows, OS, Windows 7, whatever you want to name it. It will probably be pre-filled with a name, and if that one suits you, leave it as it is.

    The next value we're interested in is "Device". Highlight "Device" and click the "Edit" button. A dialogue box will popup with two textboxes. Both textboxes are labeled "Type". The top textbox needs to be filled with the drive number where your OS partition lives. I'm assuming that since you're replacing your failing drive, it is labeled "HD0" (that's a "zero") in the "Type" textbox.

    You'll be switching SATA cables once all the partition work is done, and you'll want your new drive plugged into SATA0 on the motherboard, so the top "Type" textbox needs to be labeled "HD0" so the position will be correct.

    The second "Type" box is labeled with the name of the partition where the OS resides. Check the name that is listed, and make sure it matches the name of the partition where you copied your OS. Correct it if it's wrong. When the two textboxes contain the correct information, click OK and we'll move on.

    The next value we're interested in is "OS Device". Highlight that one and click "Edit". In your case, the values in the two textboxes should be the same as the values in the "Device" textboxes. If they're different, correct them, then click OK.

    All the other values are filled with the default values, so there is no need for any editing of them. You can click the "Close" button on that screen, click "Close" on the BCD Edit screen, then click OK on the Properties sheet.

    Next click "Close" on the "Work with Partitions" screen, then click the "Resume" button, and finally click the "Boot" button. If all the little imps and gremlins are satisfied, you should be booting into Windows shortly.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2011-03-15 at 16:12. Reason: clarity
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
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    Success!!

    I have completed the copy and verified the BCD contained the proper values (I did not need to change anything). You stated "The BCD store will have to be edited, because it probably points to the third partition (partition 2) on the drive for the OS partition, and will need to be edited to point to the second partition (partition 1) on the drive." I saw nothing that mentioned the partition number, just the partition name.

    I shut down, moved the cable from the old drive to the new drive and left the old drive disconnected. When I attempted to boot, I get the following message:

    Reboot and select proper Boot device or insert Boot Media in selected boot device and press a key

    Still no joy.

    UPDATE:
    I am now up and running. I found I needed to make the Recovery partition "Active". So far everything seems to be working and there are no hard drive errors reported by Windows. Thanks for all the help. I still need to restore drive D, my data drive, but that should be an easy task

    I should probably start a new post on this, but I need to find out what to use to make this easier next time an OS drive fails. Obviously Norton Ghost is not doing the job. Although I routinely verify I can restore regular files from backup, I didn't have the guts to wipe out the OS and test recovery of drive C.
    Last edited by Steve1951; 2011-03-15 at 18:40. Reason: Additional information.

  16. Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve1951 View Post
    I have completed the copy and verified the BCD contained the proper values (I did not need to change anything). You stated "The BCD store will have to be edited, because it probably points to the third partition (partition 2) on the drive for the OS partition, and will need to be edited to point to the second partition (partition 1) on the drive." I saw nothing that mentioned the partition number, just the partition name.

    I shut down, moved the cable from the old drive to the new drive and left the old drive disconnected. When I attempted to boot, I get the following message:

    Reboot and select proper Boot device or insert Boot Media in selected boot device and press a key

    Still no joy.
    You say you moved the cable from the old drive to the new drive and left the old drive disconnected. Are you talking about the end of the cable that connects to the drive itself, or the end of the cable that plugs into the motherboard?

    The cable for the new drive should be plugged into the first SATA port on the motherboard. I think Dell numbers them 1, 2, 3, 4. Some motherboards number them 0, 1, 2, 3. Whichever way they are numbered, the new drive cable should be plugged into the first SATA port on the motherboard.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2011-03-15 at 18:38.
    Create a new drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "Let them that don't want it have memories of not gettin' any." "Gratitude is riches and complaint is poverty and the worst I ever had was wonderful." Brother Dave Gardner "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else." Sir Thomas Robert Deware. "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Do you understand?" Captain Jack Sparrow.
    Unleash Windows

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    See the update to my previous post.

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