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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    MS Application Compatibility Toolkit not always 'fixing' UAC warnings

    Hi Loungers

    I'm trying out Microsofts 'Application Compatibility Toolkit' ACT http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/e...e-492dd6da2971 to stop the User Account Control UAC messages for a bunch of programs that need admin rights which I use a lot, and that I am also calling from (good old) DOS batch files The technique is documented at http://www.vista4beginners.com/Disab...n-applications (lots of other pages give the same info)

    My problem is it works fine for some programs but not others. My test examples are GoodSync and CCleaner, both 64 bit, both signed, admin rights set the same, etc but I still get the UAC prompt for CCleaner but not GoodSync. When I test the programs within ACT they work fine with no prompt, but the UAC prompt is back when I try to run outside ACT.

    I'm avoiding the taskscheduler workaround as that only works via shortcuts - I want the UAC to be disabled for the program so I dont get prompts regardless of how the program is started.

    Any suggestions welcomed!

    Many thanks Merf

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Merf,

    I set up Scheduled Tasks to over come this problem. You don't set a trigger but just allow it to be run on demand with highest privileges then you create a shortcut to execute it. Here's the shortcut I use for CCleaner 64 bit:
    C:\Windows\System32\schtasks.exe /run /tn "Launch CCleaner"

    Note: /tn denotes the Task Name you set up in the Task Scheduler.
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

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    Merf (2011-04-04)

  4. #3
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    RetiredGeek: I think Merf was specifically looking to avoid that solution, given the last paragraph in their post:

    I'm avoiding the taskscheduler workaround as that only works via shortcuts - I want the UAC to be disabled for the program so I dont get prompts regardless of how the program is started.
    I don't have a solution myself, though. It seems to me that if this sort of thing was possible then it would probably be abused to heck by malware...

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    Merf (2011-04-04)

  6. #4
    New Lounger
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    Hi RetiredGeek

    Many thanks for that - but the limitation with the task scheduler approach is when programs are not run from a shortcut or using shortcuts via task scheduler make for a lot of work.

    For eg if a file is in use when GoodSync tried to back it up it invokes its copy locked files VSS helper which causes UAC to pop up a prompt, as far as I'm aware having a shortcut through taskscheduler wont stop a UAC prompt in this situation or am I wrong?.

    Also I have a lot of backup 'jobs' in Goodsync which I like to run from a command line in shortcut and DOS box to give me speed and flexibility. With the task scheduler approach I need a shortcut in TS for every backup job, and making them is all a bit of a pain, esp if I have to do it for every new job, while copy and editing shortcuts and batch progs is quick and easy (I’m one of those keyboard freeks). When I multiply that by all the other programs and commandline controls I use having the UAC disabled at the program 'level' rather than at the shortcut level would be much easier.

    I would still also love to know if there are known issues with ACT that cause it to sometimes work and sometimes not work for apparently similar programs in terms of being signed, 32/64 bit status etc - as I can not see any reason why the ACT approach works with GoodSync but not CCleaner?

    All the best

    Merf

  7. #5
    Lounger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merf View Post
    When I test the programs within ACT they work fine with no prompt, but the UAC prompt is back when I try to run outside ACT.
    I'm having the same problem, and am wondering if that Matching Information screen info is somehow not matching what the UAC screen thinks it sees. The MS page http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc721928(WS.10).aspx notes:

    By default, the Compatibility Administrator automatically selects the basic matching criteria for your application. As a best practice, you should use a limited set of matching information to represent your application, as it reduces the size of the database. However, you must also make sure you have enough information to correctly identify your application.

    I've noticed discrepancies between what the UAC screen says it wants to run and the detailled criteria found in the Compatibility Manager screen. Do we actually need any criteria to be saved in the database beyond just the file name?

    I've also had it seem to work then after adding another fix, then not working.

  8. #6
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
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    Merf,

    Ok, sorry I missed your full question the first time. I just ran a little test and I created a batch file that will allow me to run any scheduled task from the run box on the start menu. It's a simple one liner.

    Code:
    schtasks.exe /run /TN %1
    To run my Malwarebytes Scheduled Task I simply type ts.cmd "Launch Malwarebytes" in the run box.

    Note: the quotes are to keep the two word task name from being interpreted as 2 arguments.

    Using this theory you could setup your task in task scheduler to accept an argument of your backup job name in GoodSync, I'm assuming you can pass arguments as I am not a GoodSync user, by adding a %2 to the code above. The batch file would run GoodSync and pass indicated job name via the %2 argument or you could setup your batch file to always run GoodSync and just pass the job name to to the task.

    Code:
    schtasks.exe /run /TN "Launch GoodSync" %1
    If you name the above batch file lgs.cmd then you would type:

    lgs.cmd WordBkUp

    to launch your GoodSync job to backup all your Word files.

    Now I've never passed an argument to a scheduled task but I think the theory is sound and should work.

    I hope this either works or at least gives you a new avenue to explore to accomplish what you're after.
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    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

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  9. #7
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    For just avoiding the UAC prompt, I wonder if the program offered at "UAC Trust Shortcut-Bypass the UAC prompt while running a program" http://bestofnawaz.wordpress.com/201...ing-a-program/ would be more reliable and simpler to use than the whole MS ACT 5.6?

  10. #8
    New Lounger
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    Hi All

    Thanks for all your helpful comments on this. I've a couple of extra points to add.

    First, updating a program (.exe) eg Goodsync, breaks the UAC override that the 'Application Compatibility Toolkit' ACT puts in place. The ACT override then needs to be 're-set'. Clearly something of a bummer for programs that need to, or get, updated often.

    I have found a ‘kind’ of a solution in the meantime. Using good old DOS .BAT (batch) files. If the batch file is given admin rights, it will ask for UAC permission when it runs (which may appear to be a pain) but then all the programs it calls that also need admin rights ‘inherit’ the UAC permission that was given to the batch file. (This is not affected by updates to the programs as noted above). The only downside is ACT does not allow UAC overrides to be given to batch files (not last time I tried several months back).

    All the best

    Cheers

    Merf

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