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  1. #1
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    Malware for Macs on its way

    Mac users, get used to it, with the increasing market share for Macs, malware is about to increase and the "superiority" of the Mac OS X, security iwse, will be shown to be nothing but uncalled for bragging. Ed Bott shows why: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/bott/why-m...e_skin;content

    Social engineering will be a major attack venue: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/bott/what-...e_skin;content

    Better be aware than in denial. Also, better get ready to hammer Apple. I know Microsoft would be thoroughly thrashed if serious security flaws were left unpatched for 18 months!

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Here, here!!! Watch out Mac lovers!
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
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    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  3. #3
    5 Star Lounger
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    This issue is not new. These articles pop up from time to time. MACs do get hacked, it just doesn't get the press like Windows attacks. Still, its not likely we'll hear about mass attacks going on. Anyone not "up to speed" so to speak can be duped by social engineering. In many years of using Windows, I have only gotten viruses a few times, and then it was from bringing a diskette home from work. However, I agree that MAC users have their heads in the sand. Most run with no anti-virus/anti-malware software and think they are immune to attack. Very foolish in my opinion.
    Chuck

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Brown View Post
    However, I agree that MAC users have their heads in the sand. Most run with no anti-virus/anti-malware software and think they are immune to attack. Very foolish in my opinion.
    I absolutely agree with you and that was the main motivator to post about the article here. No OS is immune to malware, regardless of its name or its maker.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    I was given an iMac Christmas of 2009, and after using it for several months, began to enjoy it quite a bit. I also have Windows 7 HP installed via Boot Camp. It runs great. I have enjoyed learning some things about Macs, although I would never give up Windows to go strictly Mac. I have had opportunity to write a few thoughts concerning OSX security, especially in regards to malware, and have been amazed that many Mac folks (who look down on Windows) have no clue as to its vulnerability. Mac old timers as well as the Apple culture have done an effective job of reinforcing the notion that OSX is inherently more secure than Windows 7, which is just absolutely untrue. It is simply a matter of economics. Malware authors are out to make a profit, and Windows offers the most fertile field for their efforts. As Apple's Mac OS gains in market share, it is only a matter of time before we see more "attacks on Macs".

    Currently, there are only a few antimalware programs available for Macs. Some are paid subscription based offerings, while there are a limited few available for free. I use the freebie iAntivirus by PCTools. It functions pretty much like any Windows Antivirus program - auto updating, auto scanning on a schedule, active protection, etc. It has an almost imperceptible impact on performance, which reminds me of MSE for Windows (which I use on the Windows 7 partition). I have yet to see any warning of malware infection, but I would not consider removing it. I strongly believe in a layered, multifaceted defense against malware, including smart Internet practices.

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