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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    SSD and UEFI - is it worth the investment / risk?

    I need some advice. My PC is on its last legs and its time for me to buy a new one. I have seen two Windows Secrets articles:
    http://windowssecrets.com/top-story/...y-come-of-age/ dated Octí10, and
    http://windowssecrets.com/langalist-...isks-and-trim/ dated Janí10

    I would like to know if opinion has changed since then and what type of hard drive would you recommend today? In addition to this I have read that UEFI is coming into play and is going to replace the old outdated BIOS. What do you think of UEFI?

    For my new pc I am planning on Windows 7 64 with either an Intel i5 or i7. I tend to buy a reasonably high spec pc as I use it for around 10 years before getting a new one and with the constant change and demand of new software etc. wondered if it is worth investing in SSD and UEFI both from a financial point of view and from a compatibility point of view?

    In the recent Don't pay for software you don't need ó Part 1, Woody mentions that Windows 7 automatically runs the defrag by default. If I go for a SSD, can you disable the auto defrag? And just what damage can be caused if you do run a defrag on a new SSD or Hybrid?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Caric, Welcome to the Lounge. It's nice to see new members participating.

    Yes you can disable the auto defrag through the task scheduler. Sorry but I do not know the answers to the other questions.


    disabledefragmenter.jpg

    On another note, since you probably have an older version of Windows on the old PC, a couple of sites to help learn and customize Win 7:

    Paul Thurrott's Windows Supersite

    How To Geek

    Windows Seven Forums Tutorials

    Just thought these might help. Enjoy your upgrade to Win 7.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

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    Caric (2011-05-20)

  4. #3
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    If Windows 7 detects an SSD then Windows is supposed to automatically disable defrag on that drive.

    I'm not sure that UEFI is available on any Windows PCs yet.

    Joe

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    Caric (2011-05-20)

  6. #4
    5 Star Lounger
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    UEFI is available on the following board now. MSI also do UEFI.

    ASUS P8P67 EVO Sandy Bridge Motherboard Available at Ebuyer.com

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    Caric (2011-06-02)

  8. #5
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    I would like to know if opinion has changed since then and what type of hard drive would you recommend today? In addition to this I have read that UEFI is coming into play and is going to replace the old outdated BIOS. What do you think of UEFI?
    I highly recommend the use of an SSD as your primary drive. I also recommend going out of your way to purchase and install extra regular HDD's as storage space if your new comp doesn't have any. I certainly don't regret my SSD, it's noticably faster startups.
    As others have pointed out, W7 detects an SSD and disables the default Windows defrager utility. (in theory) But as Ted points out too, it can also be confirmed and disabled manually.
    As for UEFI, If your holding out for this, it could be quite a while before it becomes mainstream.

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    Caric (2011-06-02)

  10. #6
    New Lounger
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    Thanks CLiNT. Its always difficult if you have a limited budget - yet want to get the latest so it will last the longest. Having said I want to get Windows 7 I see all this new cool stuff that is happening with Windows 8 and for once it seems its more than just a gloss of paint. The big question is it worth waiting for this as its not too far in the future. I guess it will depend on how long my current pc can hold out for on its last legs.
    http://www.techradar.com/news/softwa...to-know-701764

  11. #7
    3 Star Lounger
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    I'm not usually an early adopter, but I've got a nearly 2-year-old system with an Intel 80Gb system drive, and I love it. Still blazingly fast. Not one problem (I still do my backups, though!).
    Peter

  12. #8
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    New Computer: If you can afford to spring for a top of the line processor, do so.

    [Future Proofing]
    *Also make sure your new comp can support USB 3.0 and SATA 3.0.
    *Get as much memory as you can with your 64 bit system, don't settle for just 4 GB.
    *Ensure you have the best memory (DDR3) running at the best high default speed you can get.
    *Research manufacurers to ensure that they have a history of building stable and compatible computers with decent components.

    Do your own research, look at both professional and non professional reviews.
    Everything you need is on the internet, so take the time to do your own research and you will be better informed. Asking others will only get you so far.

    If you can't afford an SSD as your primary drive, a fast 10,000 rpm drive, like a 150 GB WD Raptor is still a good choice for a primary drive.
    You could then go green with less fast storage and backup drives. But whatever you do don't skimp on processor and memory.


    For older computers you want to preserve, the single best upgrade is memory and graphics for a cheap alternative to buying a new comp.
    A 10,000 rpm drive, if you don't already have one would make a nice addition as well. You may even find a deal on Craig's List or Ebay.
    Your second best speed tweak will be a fresh clean install with a full self-evaluation of all your current applications on the fastest drive you can get your paws on.
    If your reinstall disk is of an OEM type then decrapify it and download all your latest drivers.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2011-06-07 at 16:15.

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    Caric (2011-06-08)

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