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  1. #1
    iNET Interactive
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    Solving browser JavaScript problems




    LANGALIST PLUS

    Solving browser JavaScript problems


    By Fred Langa

    When your browser has trouble with this nearly ubiquitous scripting language, the Web is a much less useful place.

    But it's easy to restore full JavaScript functionality. Here's how.

    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/solving-browser-javascript-problems/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by Tracey Capen; 2011-06-08 at 16:57.

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    I tried all the suggestions in the JavaScript piece, but IE9 still won't work properly. For example, clicking on any of the example links on http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_examples.asp opens a new tab with a blank page. Those links work fine in FireFox & Chrome. I reset IE to default settings, disabled MSE & Windows Firewall to no avail. I had this problem before and after doing an OS reinstall.

    Any other ideas?

  3. #3
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    Fred's column mentions the "Can't create Win7 System Repair disc . . . error message 0x80070057" problem. His explanation is that "it's most often caused by a conflict between Windows' native tools and special versions of similar recovery tools provided by system vendors." My tests showed it to be a file access problem. The solution was to log on using the hidden Administrator account. This is not simply a user account with admin privileges.

    For more information and background discussion of the issue, see this thread in a Windows Seven forum.

  4. #4
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandySea View Post
    Fred's column mentions the "Can't create Win7 System Repair disc . . . error message 0x80070057" problem. His explanation is that "it's most often caused by a conflict between Windows' native tools and special versions of similar recovery tools provided by system vendors." My tests showed it to be a file access problem. The solution was to log on using the hidden Administrator account. This is not simply a user account with admin privileges.

    For more information and background discussion of the issue, see this thread in a Windows Seven forum.
    You may be correct in some cases, but Toshiba for one does have its own utility for making a System Recovery Disk, and it is part of a six-disk Recovery and Restore set. Other vendors simply sell their disks or only give them out as part of a tech support troubleshooting exchange.
    -- Bob Primak --

  5. #5
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    I don't disagree with you, Bob. If your pc manufacturer gives you a more complete recovery strategy, by all means use it. My experience with some mfrs, like Dell, is all their recovery disks do is set you back to the "as delivered" state. Software, data, updates all down the tube. There are at least a few things that can be fixed with a repair disk that don't wipe the boot driver.

    I'd add that there are other alternatives to what mfr's provide, and other than what MS offers. Personally, I like Ghost and have restored entire boot drives numerous times with it.

    My main point was really much simpler. If someone does want to create a vanilla Windows System Repair disk, which MS says they can do from right inside Windows 7, they may have to log on with a special account to do it. That is, I was saying that Fred's explanation may not have been correct.
    Last edited by RandySea; 2011-06-09 at 17:39.

  6. #6
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandySea View Post
    I don't disagree with you, Bob. If your pc manufacturer gives you a more complete recovery strategy, by all means use it. My experience with some mfrs, like Dell, is all their recovery disks do is set you back to the "as delivered" state. Software, data, updates all down the tube. There are at least a few things that can be fixed with a repair disk that don't wipe the boot driver.

    I'd add that there are other alternatives to what mfr's provide, and other than what MS offers. Personally, I like Ghost and have restored entire boot drives numerous times with it.

    My main point was really much simpler. If someone does want to create a vanilla Windows System Repair disk, which MS says they can do from right inside Windows 7, they may have to log on with a special account to do it. That is, I was saying that Fred's explanation may not have been correct.
    You may have misunderstood my post. One of the Toshiba disks is the generic Windows 7 Repair and Recovery Disk. Plain Vanilla. (On modified OEM computers, the disk would be manufacturer-specific but would not necessarily initiate a return to the original system state.) The other available Toshiba disks are manufacturer-specific. One disk returns only the Drivers to their original state, not touching any other software. The Win-7 Repair Disk can be burned any number of times by itself, and no special account is needed. The Win-7 Repair Disk is not machine-specific, so anyone's Repair Disk can be used on any Windows 7 installation of the same bits (32 or 64). This Disk does not install Windows 7, but can repair some serious errors.

    More and more manufacturers are offering similar utilities to my Toshiba utility. Some of these utilities override or disable the native Windows 7 disk-burning option, so Fred is right. At least in some cases. And in these cases there may be a reason NOT to go for a plain-vanilla repair: OEM versions of Windows 7 can be highly modified for some laptops, and standard repairs may do more harm than good in these systems. This is also why certain MS Updates refuse to install or are not offered for some OEM systems. Overwriting OEM System files with generic repairs or updates can prove fatal. The File Access restriction you found may be an outgrowth of all of these considerations by the computer manufacturer. You can override the restriction with the Hidden Administrator trick, but this is not advisable on proprietary OEM systems.

    Within Windows 7 the process says it does require an account with Administrator privileges, but not FULL Admin privileges. Never needed to do it from inside of Win-7, however.

    As you mentioned, sometimes the best repair option is to reimage the System and Windows Partitions using a backup archive. It's just as fast as using the Repair Console, and often works a lot better. At least in my experience. Your Mileage May Vary.
    Last edited by bobprimak; 2011-06-11 at 03:38.
    -- Bob Primak --

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