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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    XP Splash--then blank screen

    After the blank screen, it just sits with the hard drive apparently running, but nothing visible on the screen. It is as tho the HD is searching for something--it flashes intermittently. After a half hour of this, when nothing happens, I turn the computer off, then on again, with the same result. After rebooting 2 or 3 times, it come up normally and displays the desktop. This is not consistent; it appears to be random.

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    I had a similar problem and found it was my video card going bad. When it finally went bad completely my computer would just boot to a blank screen and the HDD kept running like your does now.
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    Great answer--new question: How do you check the video card?

    This certainly sounds like the answer, but a new question: how do you check the video card's health??

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    I guess you could try a new one but I'm really not sure how you can test it while it's still in the PC...
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  5. #5
    5 Star Lounger chowur's Avatar
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    Check the Video Card in a PC


    • 1 Click on the "Start" button in the Start bar menu. Click on "Settings," and then Control Panel.

    • 2 Look for and locate the System icon. Click on the System icon. Click on the Hardware tab and then click on "Device Manager."

    • 3 Scroll down the list of devices until you find the "video" or "displays." Double click on that listing to view the current video card. It may be listed under the heading "Display Adapters." You will be able to view the name and model of the video card in a drop down menu.




    Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them. -Albert Einsten

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  7. #6
    3 Star Lounger
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    I would make a backup of the machine as soon as possible for piece of mind if there is any data on there that you wish to keep. This may or may not be a display issue at this stage of the diagnosis.

    Recommending that you run SeaTools for Windows from Seagate which can carry out generic tests on all hard disks from other manufacturers. I recommend this because it is easy and straight forward. Running a SMART test and also some Basic Tests to begin with.

    http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.js...00dd04090aRCRD

    This will ensure to some degree that the hard disk is not a fault. Because what may be happening is that Windows is not progressing because it has come across some corrupted / inaccessible data.

    If the hard disk comes back faultless then I would pursue the possibility of the display adapter (video card) being at fault. The likelihood of this if the display adapter is integrated chipset on the motherboard slims dramatically though where as addon cards are much more susceptible to failure.

  8. #7
    New Lounger
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    Sir good information

  9. #8
    New Lounger
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    THANKS

    Screed it

  10. #9
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
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    If your PC is a desktop model, and you have a discrete video card that is suspect, you can remove the card and reboot the PC. Almost all modern motherboards come with an on board video chip that is disabled automatically when a discrete card is installed. If you remove the discrete card and the problem continues, then your video card is unlikely to be the source of the problem.

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