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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    how do I move Windows to another PC

    Speaking of images, there is a procedure (provided your installation of Windows is Retail, not OEM) for making an image that has the ability to be restored to almost any PC of the same or newer vintage. For example, if one wishes to upgrade the whole box, it can be done, and as long as the installation is removed from the old PC, it meets the EULA for Retail versions of Windows.

    Where can I find this procedure?

    Thanks,
    Bob S
    Last edited by RFSndrs; 2011-06-12 at 19:49. Reason: To make my question clearer

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Bob, Welcome to the Lounge!

    There are many posts, some with step by step instructions, in the Security and Backup forum that discuss various Imaging apps. The 2 most discussed are Macrium Reflect (free and paid versions) and Acronis True Image Home (paid version, free to try) I use Acronis and Acronis states that you would need their app plus their Plus Pack to perform this restoration on new hardware although there are discussions where some have stated to successfully do this without the Plus Pack. I believe Macrium Reflect also allows this (not sure, this may be a feature of the paid version).
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    I split these posts into a separate thread. Please do not hijack other threads. Your question deserves its own visibility.

    Joe

  4. #4
    New Lounger
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    Cool

    Unlike Windows XP, Windows 7 does pretty good on just moving the HDD from the old system to the new one. It will spend some time on the first boot recognizing all the new hardware, but overall it is usually very successful.

    That having been said, it is ALWAYS better to do a fresh install of everything if you are going to all new hardware to eliminate the probability that you will carry glitches from the old to the new.

    To do this (legally) you would need to borrow an installation disk of the proper type from someone and use just use the installation key from the system you are replacing. When all is up and all your applications, etc. are installed on the new system, take the old HDD and temporary it into the new system and move all your data to the appropriate places. At that point it would be safe to reformat the old drive.

    Now, I'm not a lawyer, so that might not be TECHNICALLY correct, but you would have satisfied the intent of the EULA agreement in that you are only using the operating system and related applications in ONE computer.

  5. #5
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    This will only work if the key was originally for a retail version of Win7. I suspect in this case the OS might be an OEM version of Win 7. If this is the case, then the key will only work with the original hardare. In this case I would think only the image method will work.
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  6. #6
    New Lounger
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    Red face

    >>>This will only work if the key was originally for a retail version of Win7<<<

    I work on computers all the time that have been lightening damaged and there isn't much left except the HDD (if it was off when it got hit) and the OEM label on the side of the box. Buying OEM replacement parts from the manufacturer is not a viable path to repair. You know that, and I know that! That would be like having your car destroyed by a fire and buying enough OEM parts from your friendly local dealership to build a new one . . . it aint gonna happen!

    The key on the sticker is a brand new never been used key. If you don't believe me, take a factory-build Win 7 box and your key-finder software to read the key that the factory used . . . compare it with the key on the sticker on the side of the box. They are not the same! Now, if you try and use the key that your key-finder software revealed on a system other than the original system, then yes, they will give you a hard time about that because it has been associated with hardware from a particular manufacturer. But, if you use the key that you already paid for which is displayed on the side of your factory-built box, it will authenticate every time because it has never been used, and is not associated with any particular piece of hardware.

    Now, as I said in my original post, I'm not a lawyer, and don't pretend to be. What I am saying is that Microsoft isn't the hard case that some would make them out to be. They will be reasonable with you if you're not trying to take advantage of them.

    NOTE: Post was edited to remove sarcasm and inappropriate language.

    Deadeye81
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    Last edited by Deadeye81; 2011-06-15 at 18:25. Reason: Edit inappropriate language

  7. #7
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    You never said the key printed on the sticker affixed to the PC. You just said the key, which most would assume is the original OEM key for that PC. If I'm not mistaken the key printed on the original cover/box for the DVD (if a DVD was included with the PC originally) is also the OEM key, which is different than the sticker affixed to the PC. If an individual would attempt to use this original DVD to reinstall on a different PC (even if from the same manufacturer) the activation would fail as well.

    The original OP appears to wish to save the time of a complete reinstall and use an image to recreate the OS on new hardware. My original post attempted to answer this question, not provide an alternative method on the new PC.
    Last edited by Deadeye81; 2011-06-15 at 18:28. Reason: Some content removed as a consequence of editing Post#6.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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