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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    New computer - changing drives

    I have a new computer but I want to use a different (faster and larger) drive as the boot drive. At this point I have not booted the existing drive - it is still in the new computer.
    1. How can I use the installation program on the new computer drive on the new drive.
    2. Does the installation allow me to boot the OS on a different drive?
    3. Can I image the computer drive to the new drive somehow?
    4. Do I go ahead and bring up the new computer as is and then install the new drive and then image the first drive to the second (new) drive and boot from the second drive (change bios).

    Any ideas

    AND

    Does the Windows 7 image program work OK.


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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooleydd View Post
    I have a new computer but I want to use a different (faster and larger) drive as the boot drive. At this point I have not booted the existing drive - it is still in the new computer.
    1. How can I use the installation program on the new computer drive on the new drive.
    2. Does the installation allow me to boot the OS on a different drive?
    3. Can I image the computer drive to the new drive somehow?
    4. Do I go ahead and bring up the new computer as is and then install the new drive and then image the first drive to the second (new) drive and boot from the second drive (change bios).
    cooleydd,
    Hello... Lots of questions ..I'll do my best... Keep in mind that I'm giving "Tech" advice...not legal...

    1. Is the new PC an "OEM" (windows pre-installed ) Or do you have a "Install Disk"
    2. You can change drives by "Imaging" the original, and transferring to the new... Or "Cloning" the original to a larger drive.
    3\4. If you have a "OEM" install... you have to "Boot-er-up" and do the switching around after. If you have the "Disk" you can install the new HD first.

    Windows Backup and Restore works ...but there are much better choices both free and pay for.... Post back and we will try to answer more specifically. Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

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  4. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    For just transferring you system to a new drive I have heard that cloning works best, whereas I would ALWAYS use Imaging for my system backups. Since I have never actually done this I do not have personal experience with cloning. Fred's concern about OEM versus Retail Win7 may cause problems. If OEM, this can only be activated on the original hardware. If retail the switch should go as expected. The new hardware will not allow activation of an OEM copy of Win 7 transferred from another PC.
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  5. #4
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    I would use a third party drive imaging tool's boot disk to boot the new computer and make an image of its existing drive to an external hard drive. If it has more than one partition, make a drive image of every partition on the disk. I would then exchange the existing drive for the faster and larger hard drive that you wish to use. Next I would again boot from the third party imaging tool's boot disk and restore the drive image(s) saved on the external drive to the new faster and larger hard drive that you wish to use. Then boot the new computer into Windows from the new faster and larger hard drive.

    I don't think you'll have any problem with activation, since you're only changing the hard drive, and even if it balks, you shouldn't have any real difficulty in explaining your situation to Microsoft. The OEM license does allow for an upgrade or two without calling it a new computer. The main kicker on that score is changing the motherboard/CPU except for a direct replacement, not an upgrade.

    My imaging tool of choice is BootIt Bare Metal. It isn't free, but there are some that are, and well recommended by members of the Lounge.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2011-07-16 at 23:23.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
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  6. #5
    New Lounger
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    It is a new computer with a OEM install and no disks. I have installed programs on the new computer. I want to take everything over to a new faster hard drive (SATA 3, 7200 RPM) for gaming. Can you give me more detailed steps on how to accomplish this. Recommendations for free or pay program to be used to do this would be appreciated. What is the difference between "imaging" and "cloning". I do have access to a 2TB external hard drive that I can connect.

  7. #6
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    I use Acronis True Image (TI), but the description should be valid for any imaging app.

    1. Choose the imaging app and install it.
    2. Use the appropriate option of the chosen app to create a bootable rescue disk.
    3. Create a full disk image of your existing disk on the external disk
    4. Install the new disk
    5. Boot your computer using the boot disk created in step 2 and restore the image created from the external disk to the new one.
    6. Remove the disk and let the computer boot normally.

    There is an alternative to this, but I think this is the simpler approach.

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  9. #7
    Super Moderator bbearren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooleydd View Post
    It is a new computer with a OEM install and no disks. I have installed programs on the new computer. I want to take everything over to a new faster hard drive (SATA 3, 7200 RPM) for gaming. Can you give me more detailed steps on how to accomplish this. Recommendations for free or pay program to be used to do this would be appreciated. What is the difference between "imaging" and "cloning". I do have access to a 2TB external hard drive that I can connect.
    The detailed steps depend on the tool you use. I've already given you a link to the tool I use, which is $34.95US. There are a number of free tools as well. Macrium Reflect is one, but I have never used it. Many here do recommend it, however.

    "Imaging" usually means making a compressed file of the entire contents of a partition or drive. That image can be restored to the same drive/partition or to another drive/partition of similar size. Imaging can be used for "cloning", as well. Cloning refers to making an exact and complete duplicate of a drive or partition.
    Last edited by bbearren; 2011-07-23 at 13:17.
    Create a fresh drive image before making system changes, in case you need to start over!

    "The problem is not the problem. The problem is your attitude about the problem. Savvy?"—Captain Jack Sparrow "When you're troubleshooting, start with the simple and proceed to the complex."—M.O. Johns "Experience is what you get when you're looking for something else."—Sir Thomas Robert Deware.
    Unleash Windows

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    cooleydd (2011-07-23)

  11. #8
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    One added comment on Imaging, as you change your system, create new Images. I store my Images on an ext HD, but they could just as easily be stored on a separate int HD on a desktop. The length of time to restore with an Up To Date Image is generally less than 10 minutes. If your Image is, say, 6 months old, then any changes you have made (updates to apps, new apps, uninstalled apps, etc) will have to be redone. But if your Image was made just prior to the problem, then 10 minutes later you are back in business.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
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