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Thread: 'Splain Lucy...

  1. #1
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    'Splain Lucy...

    Can anyone explain the voltages I have circled are for?
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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I believe these are the various power supply voltages. If only one voltage was needed you would only need 2 wires. Most PS's have 4 wires, hence 3 different voltages and a commom (ground)
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    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    Fine but, I want to know what each one is...

    I believe they are Motherboard voltages..
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    For reference, here's a link to the ATX PSU spec on Wikipedia.

    Note, the V_Core is a derived power rail, generated by on-board voltage regulators (the black mosfet slabs next to your CPU). Voltage regualtor and/or capacitor failure are one of the major causes of motherboard failure over the long term.

    Your 12V rail and V_Core rail are a little on the low side, but still in spec. This should not adversely affect performance, unless you are driving the machine very heavily when the rails dip due to current load or the cpu fet's struggle to switch fast enough at high speed. In these circumstances over-clockers tend to increase V_Core and others slightly to account for the voltage drops and high speed switching in the CPU. Unless you are doing something out of the ordinary, yours should be ok.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Banyarola View Post
    Can anyone explain the voltages I have circled are for?
    Banyarola,
    Hello...If you compare these against CPUID HW Monitor V-1.16 HW Monitor It may help ...don't like "Speed Fan" Regards Fred
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    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    Fred, I have that but I don't understand what the voltage readings are for what components...

    In other words....I don't know what the readings mean and there is no help with CPUID describing each reading and what it's for.
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    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    Those values are from sensors located on your motherboard and specifically relate to current values.

    Vcore is voltage supplied to your processor core as supplied from your PSU. If you have more than 1 core, more values may be displayed.
    Vcc refers to "collector" voltage. (somewhat more complicated)
    The "+12v", refers to voltage from your PSU, the "11.62v" is the reported value.
    Untitled.jpg
    an example of mine
    Try CPUID Hardware monitor, it may provide you with all/more sensor values.

    Many of these voltage values will be important to know if you are making any kind of clock adjustments, like memory and or CPU overclocking.
    Otherwise, they are of little significance.
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2011-08-02 at 15:14.

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    • V_Core is the derived regulated supply voltage for the CPU Core
    • 12V is the 12 Volt rail from the PSU to the motherboard from which several on-board supplies are derived. The 12V rail is very important for GPU cards and the like. It is a high current rail and needs plenty of oomph.
    • AVcc is the Analogue Vcc rail ie, the 3.3 volt rail for the CPU sub system and associated components, it too needs plenty of oomph (current drive), but not as much as the 12volt rail.



    These supplies are shown in Speedfan to allow you to monitor them against Spec, especially if you have an overclocked system. As noted earlier the rails as measured are slightly low, but still within spec and unless you are having problems with the system, they will be fine at those voltages.

    Speedfan can be of use if you are seeing heat related issues, lockups or crashes as it can be configured to write temperature, fan rpms and voltages to a log file so you can trace any over temp conditions. You can also adjust the speed of the cooling fans (hence the name!) in relation to the sensed temperature, but I personally think this is a dangerous thing to do and leave that to the BIOS.

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    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Basic 5v and 12v are supplied by the main power supply in the back corner of the computer case,
    While on the motherboard are several regulators that break down the 5v to lower voltages for the various processor chips on your motherboard and video card that require lesser voltages. Even some ram chips require less than 5volts.

    That VCore is the voltage required by the actual CORE of your CPU chip. Eh?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWho View Post
    That VCore is the voltage required by the actual CORE of your CPU chip. Eh?
    http://download.intel.com/design/pro...hts/318732.pdf Page 17 and 18.

    Unfortunately for this discussion, Intel confusingly call this Vcc on p17 and Core Vcc on p18 - which reflects CLiNT's comment about Vcc. I've seen several definitions of Vcc before and it sometimes depends on what diffusion technology one is working with. It doesn't help in this case that Speedfan lists an AVcc, which being around 3.3volts is (unsurprisingly) the 3.3 Vcc rail.

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    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    Thanks guys...
    Your info helped a lot...
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    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    It's a jungle in there!
    And just when you think you have all the answers, some jerkwad comes along and changes the questions.
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

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    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
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    Oh don't I know it...
    You get one thing understood and then it's obsolete and a new thing comes out...
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