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  1. #1
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Advanced Format disks and external USB disk enclosures

    Really a question for hardware techies!

    I am hoping to get a Hitachi TravelStar 7K750 750GB or 640GB as a replacement for my current laptop's 7K200 (200GB), and want to put the 750GB (or 640GB) 2" drive into an external USB disk enclosure so that I can clone the dual-boot system to it (using Macrium Reflect v5, since you ask!).

    Both disks are SATA-300 (or whatever you call it), but the newer drive has 4kB physical sectors, which defines "Advanced Format".

    Would 'any' external enclosure which supports 2" SATA drives cope with the Advanced Format-ness? Is it irrelevant?
    Occasionally a 'maximum size' is quoted for an inserted drive. Is there any good reason for this, or does it just reflect the largest size of disk available when the blurb was written?

    Thanks!
    BATcher

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    Quote Originally Posted by BATcher View Post
    Really a question for hardware techies!

    I am hoping to get a Hitachi TravelStar 7K750 750GB or 640GB as a replacement for my current laptop's 7K200 (200GB), and want to put the 750GB (or 640GB) 2" drive into an external USB disk enclosure so that I can clone the dual-boot system to it (using Macrium Reflect v5, since you ask!).

    Both disks are SATA-300 (or whatever you call it), but the newer drive has 4kB physical sectors, which defines "Advanced Format".

    Would 'any' external enclosure which supports 2" SATA drives cope with the Advanced Format-ness? Is it irrelevant?
    Occasionally a 'maximum size' is quoted for an inserted drive. Is there any good reason for this, or does it just reflect the largest size of disk available when the blurb was written?

    Thanks!
    It's irrelevant. The external enclosure will give you a standard interface for your driver (USB, esata, whatever you may choose). Then it will be your OS that will have to deal with the drive, through that interface. The enclosure will be totally "ignorant" about disk formats.

  3. #3
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    Enclosures usually handle the disk for you, meaning they don't use the structures as a standard hard disk controller would. This will prevent your clone working as expected when you plug it into the internal controller. Always use the internal controller for cloning etc.

    cheers, Paul

  4. #4
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul T View Post
    Enclosures usually handle the disk for you, meaning they don't use the structures as a standard hard disk controller would. This will prevent your clone working as expected when you plug it into the internal controller. Always use the internal controller for cloning etc.
    Thanks, both. I'd need to take the current hard disk out of the laptop, and put it in the USB-connected enclosure, and put the new disk in the laptop. Then boot from the Macrium Reflect bootable CD, and hope I can clone "backwards"!
    BATcher

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    I always use a desktop for that sort of thing and connect both to the internal controller.
    Maybe IMAGEX from MS will work as it only works at file level after you have created the partitions. Boot from WinPE to start - WinPE recognises external/USB hard disks.
    Let us know how it goes?

    cheers, Paul

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    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    Putting the old HD into the enclosure then booting to Macrium with the new HD installed should allow the clone to be accomplished. Macrium will boot then allow you to point to the enclosure for the OS to be cloned, I would think. Either that or install the new HD in the enclosure first, boot to Macrium on the old HD still in the laptop, clone to the new HD in the enclosure, then swap them. One or the other should work fine.

    The other possibility is to create an Image of the old HD onto removable media (optical media, ext HD, whatever), install the new HD, boot to Macrium and point to the Image and restore the Image to the new HD.

    Another possibility, create a second partition on the old HD, create an image of the OS to the second partition, swap the HD and follow the above procedure.

    I have never actually done this so I'm not sure which one would be easiest. I always use Images, so I'm not sure of the exact clone procedure. Good luck!
    Last edited by Medico; 2011-08-09 at 16:00.
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    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    At all cost, you want to protect the original drive from being erased, formatted, etc.
    When performing a routine like you want to do, I'm all about the safety and integrity of the original drive.
    So, with that thought in mind, here's what I'd do.

    Using a mobile to SATA adapter, I would connect the original drive to my own PC and make a DISK image of it,
    stored on my own hard drive. Then I'd take the original drive and put it in an Anti-Static bag, for safe keeping.
    Then I'd connect the new drive to my PC again using the same adapter and do a restore of the Disk Image to the new
    drive. Then install the new drive into the laptop and see if it boots up normally.

    There are several good backup programs, however, being Old School, I use Ghost 11.5 which works well with all versions of Windows.

    However you do it, just be careful to protect the original drive from damage, erasure, etc.

    Good Luck,
    The Doctor

    PS: Bring it on down here and I'll do it for you. Bring BEER!
    Sorry, I didn't see that you're in Jolly Auld England.
    Hitachi? Travelstar?
    The Hitachi (IBM) Deskstar was nic-named "Deathstar" because of its poor quality.
    A word to the wise........
    Last edited by DrWho; 2011-08-13 at 11:16.
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    We all hated the Deathstar, but Hitachi fixed that very quickly. All good now.

    cheers, Paul

  9. #9
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Myers View Post
    Putting the old HD into the enclosure then booting to Macrium with the new HD installed should allow the clone to be accomplished. Macrium will boot then allow you to point to the enclosure for the OS to be cloned, I would think. Either that or install the new HD in the enclosure first, boot to Macrium on the old HD still in the laptop, clone to the new HD in the enclosure, then swap them. One or the other should work fine.
    Thanks, Ted. It is quite possible to do the cloning while within Windows 7, to a target external USB drive. And you can put the start sector of the target partition(s) at 1MB in, not at sector 63, for Windows 7. (Why not at sector 64, like all the Advanced Format "fix" programs seem to do, I don't know.) And rearrange the order of the partitions, and resize them, on the target disk. Took about 2 hours for a total of about 100 GB of data cloned to three partitions.

    All I need now is to actually get the 7K750 750GB hard drive delivered!
    BATcher

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