Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    103
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    "Back up and Restore" Problems

    When the article on "Backups" came out I did that. I had a problem. When the article on "Reinstalling" came out, since I had a few other small problems too, I decided to do that. Everything went relatively well. The other problems seem to be fixed. I still have the same problem with "Backup". On the Backup page in Control Panel at the top I see the following message, "Check backup disk space" "The disk that your backups are being saved on doesn't have enough free space." However just below it shows that the external hard drive has 232GB. After backing up my Hard Drive (C) it shows the space used is 141GB. There are three things in blue on this page: "Manage Space", "Turn on Schedule" and "Change settings". Clicking on these, either right or left results in nothing. They seem to be inoperative. This leaves me with no way to set up scheduled backups. I have no idea how the computer decided to save the backup to the external hard drive (J) in my case since I see no way to specify that. Any comments would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Johnson City, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    3,202
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 215 Times in 202 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Miv View Post
    Any comments would be appreciated.
    Miv,
    Hello... and welcome to the Lounge...There are many here that will try to help you with your PC problems.. Personally I'm not a "Fan" of "Windows Backup". First... How large is your OS? Windows Backup has some compression so the Image will be somewhat smaller... Also you can specify where to save your "Backup" you must have inadvertently clicked on your "external". You would be much better served by a 3rd party Imaging program (Free) that is much more flexible than the windows flavor...It offers selectable Compression , Verification, Speed, and the ability to easily look at (explore) the backup image. It's called Macrium Reflect Macrium Reflect Free Post back with any questions ... Regards Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  3. #3
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    103
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    The article that appeared in Windows Secrets seemed to suggest that the Windows 7 (I have Ultimate) Backup program is excellent. As you can see mine doesn't work. If no one shows up with some astonishing insite to my problem, I will try your suggestion and thanks for the quick reply.

  4. #4
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Johnson City, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    3,202
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 215 Times in 202 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Miv View Post
    The article that appeared in Windows Secrets seemed to suggest that the Windows 7 (I have Ultimate) Backup program is excellent. As you can see mine doesn't work. If no one shows up with some astonishing insite to my problem, I will try your suggestion and thanks for the quick reply.
    Miv,
    I have compared Acronis True Image Home (2010 V-7046) and Macrium Reflect Free against Windows Backup (7 \ 64).. and the bottom line is ...Yes Windows works , but in comparison it is both "Clunky" and "Clumsy" . Just search this forum for Macrium Reflect, and you will find many threads .. Regards Fred
    Last edited by Just Plain Fred; 2011-08-04 at 17:46.
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  5. #5
    mart44
    Guest
    In Windows 7, 'Set up backup' and 'Create a system image' are two options found in 'Control Panel > Backup and Restore'. I thought 'Set up backup' a bit difficult to use and so always back up individual files/folders by just copying and pasting them to another internal hard disk. Any photos, documents, downloads are stored on the 2nd disk (a partition on the same disk would also suffice). The C: drive is used only for the operating system and programs. Any files created on there are transferred (backed up) to the 2nd disk straight away. This is handy for if the OS goes so badly wrong or messy that it becomes in need of restoring. No created files ever get overwritten by the process.

    When it comes to disk imaging ,the Windows 'Create a system image' function is used. I had Acronis on XP but have found Windows' own disk imaging tool quite adequate since switching to Windows 7 when it was first released. By default, each image made will overwrite the previous one but it is possible to store more than one disk image on the 2nd drive. This being done by cutting and pasting an image from the route of the 2nd drive and placing it inside a separate folder. By this method, it's possible to have several images with each one having its own folder.

    The name given by Windows to the disk image folder can't be changed (called 'WindowsImageBackup') but the folder created for containing it can be called anything distinctive so that you'd know what's in the image. Even put a note inside the folder as to what is in the backup. When a disk image is required for restoration purposes, just cut and paste it from the folder to the route of the 2nd drive/partition. The restoration operation will always be able to find it there. I've used this practice a number of times since owning Windows 7. Never a problem yet. So if you don't want to spend on third-party software, consider using the Windows 'Create a system image' function.

  6. #6
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,631
    Thanks
    161
    Thanked 936 Times in 856 Posts
    mart44, Welcome to the Lounge. It's always nice to see new members contributing.

    Clunky. With Acronis I can just change the Image name and store as many Images as I wish. Same is true with Macrium Reflect. 3rd party apps just have more features and can do more with much more eloquence than Win 7 Backup and restore.
    Last edited by Medico; 2011-08-06 at 04:44.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  7. #7
    mart44
    Guest
    Thanks for the welcome. True, it does seem clunky to start with compared to other disk imaging software ..but OK when you get used to it. The built-in solution is there, so always an option anyway.

    I restore using a Windows disk image quite regularly because I like to try out various softwares. Restoring is a clean way of getting back to the time before I installed anything as a trial. I thought about using Acronis and have tried Macruim but Windows 7's own imaging tool does the job, so I've stayed with it.

  8. #8
    mart44
    Guest
    Just a little more on using Windows 7's 'Create a system image'. Here's the folder structure I use for storing multiple images. OK, I know it's clunky but it works for me.

    tree.gif

  9. #9
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Johnson City, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    3,202
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 215 Times in 202 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by mart44 View Post
    True, it does seem clunky to start with compared to other disk imaging software ..but OK when you get used to it. The built-in solution is there, so always an option anyway.

    Windows 7's own imaging tool does the job, so I've stayed with it.
    mart44,
    Just my opinion...Imaging is the single most important thing that any serious PC user can perform..That said , when comparing Windows Imaging to third party software... the only thing that you can say about windows imaging is.... that it works. But.... you overlook things that you (and many others) shouldn't.
    1. Windows, you can't verify the image.
    2. Windows, you can't choose compression... Resulting in larger "backups"
    3. Windows, When you open the "main" backup folder and observe what it contains ...your first thought is "What the heck is this" ?
    4. Windows , you can't easily explore all the file and folders of the image.
    5. Windows, Imaging speed when compared to Acronis 2010 or Macrium Reflect Free, is " All ahead Slug Slow"
    on and on .

    You my think that these things are a trivial matter ...Myself and many others don't. Stick with what you like, but in reality Windows Backup doesn't and can't compare with 3rd party Imaging programs... even in their basic function. Regards Fred
    Last edited by Just Plain Fred; 2011-08-07 at 15:36.
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  10. #10
    mart44
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain Fred View Post
    mart44,
    Just my opinion...Imaging is the single most important thing that any serious PC user can perform..That said , when comparing Windows Imaging to third party software... the only thing that you can say about windows imaging is.... that it works. But.... you overlook things that you (and many others) shouldn't.
    1. Windows, you can't verify the image.
    2. Windows, you can't choose compression... Resulting in larger "backups"
    3. Windows, When you open the "main" backup folder and observe what it contains ...your first thought is "What the heck is this" ?
    4. Windows , you can't easily explore all the file and folders of the image.
    5. Windows, Imaging speed when compared to Acronis 2010 or Macrium Reflect Free, is " All ahead Slug Slow"
    on and on .

    You my think that these things are a trivial matter ...Myself and many others don't. Stick with what you like, but in reality Windows Backup doesn't and can't compare with 3rd party Imaging programs... even in there basic function. Regards Fred
    I agree that imaging is the single most important thing that any serious PC user can perform and most certainly do not feel it is a trivial matter. If I could just defend Windows 7 disk imaging a bit and answer the points though. This is because I've used it exclusively since getting Windows 7. In reply to the listed drawbacks:

    1. The disk image can't be verified but then I have imaged and restored many times. So many times that I've developed a confidence that images are reliable.

    2. It won't compress but disk space is plentiful. An image of my C: drive takes up about 30GB.

    3. This can be overcome by giving the folders that contain the 'WindowsImageBackup' folders distinctive names. A Notepad file can also be put inside the containing folder.

    4. The image can't be explored. It is just a straight image. Acronis or other has to be used for that feature. I haven't needed that personally.

    5. I have the time.

    W.7's disk imaging isn't as well-featured as other solutions but as said, it works. I'm not saying that I'd never use other imaging software but because of the reliability experienced so far with W.7 disk imaging, I haven't as yet felt the need to use anything else.
    Last edited by mart44; 2011-08-07 at 13:02. Reason: typo

  11. #11
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,631
    Thanks
    161
    Thanked 936 Times in 856 Posts
    I think the more important thing here is to create Up To Date Images, no matter what app you are comfortable using. The more Up To Date the Image is, the more rapidly the restoration will go. I believe Imaging is the "Gold Standard" for restoration of a PC. No matter what app you choose just DO IT!
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •