Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 39
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    12
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Many restarts damage hard drive?

    Hi All! Maybe someone in this Lounge can settle this issue once and for all. My brother restarts after installing a new application, after uninstalling an application, after a defrag, after a backup, you name it. In his mind, no task is too trivial not to require a restart. I don't exactly know what he thinks a restart does, but I maintain that he's generally wasting his time, and his hard drive will pay the price much too soon. Does anyone have any opinions one way or the other?
    Thanks for any input.
    Mike Rapp
    (FourEyes)
    Last edited by CLiNT; 2011-08-14 at 22:24.

  2. Get our unique weekly Newsletter with tips and techniques, how to's and critical updates on Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows XP, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Google, etc. Join our 480,000 subscribers!

    Excel 2013: The Missing Manual

    + Get this BONUS — free!

    Get the most of Excel! Learn about new features, basics of creating a new spreadsheet and using the infamous Ribbon in the first chapter of Excel 2013: The Missing Manual - Subscribe and download Chapter 1 for free!

  3. #2
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Johnson City, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    3,203
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 212 Times in 199 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by MDRapp View Post
    Does anyone have any opinions one way or the other?
    Thanks for any input.
    Mike,
    Hello....There are some program updates that require this "Restart" Also when installing or doing a repair of some software...Reason being that If the (system C: HD) is "active" the program can't have access to change things around to install itself completely. As far a "Trashing the HD " Yes any mechanical device is "Stressed" when powered up .... But this argument has those on both sides ...Bottom line is Sometimes it's required ...but not in every instance... Regards Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  4. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,625
    Thanks
    161
    Thanked 930 Times in 851 Posts
    My PCs get shut down each night, whenever an update needs the restart as Fred mentioned, and when ever something unexpected happens that I feel may be helped by a restart. Your brother may be going overboard, but he feels more comfortable doing this so just let him. I do things with my PCs that others here would say the same about. That's why we call these things personal computers.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  5. #4
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    793
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 27 Times in 25 Posts
    There are some cases where I have been bit by problems when I didn't reboot after installing or uninstalling an application. Therefore I now usually reboot my PC after uninstalling any application(s), especially before installing new applications. Other applications where I know they will want to do a reboot, I wait until just before I shutdown the PC anyway.

    As far as the wear-and-tear on hard drives goes, that debate has gone on for ages, yet no-one has offered definitive proof one way or the other as to which is best: leave the PC running or shut to down occasionally (e.g., at the end f each day). But drives have become much more reliable than what they were 20 or 30 years ago. And consider this: drives nowadays automatically power down if they are not being used. I notice this on my desktop when I decide to access drive I haven't used in a while and have to wait 10-15 seconds for the drive to spin back up. In all, I suspect that the computer will have to be replaced long before the drive gives out.

  6. #5
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    33
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Thermo expansion is the danger to computer components ... a restart is not much risk.

  7. #6
    Gold Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Johnson City, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    3,203
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 212 Times in 199 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by pcunite View Post
    Thermo expansion is the danger to computer components ... a restart is not much risk.
    pcunite,
    It's a mechanical device (HD).... Regards Fred
    PlainFred

    None are so hopelessly enslaved as those who falsely believe they are free (J. W. Von Goethe)

  8. #7
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    10,287
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 1,154 Times in 1,063 Posts
    If I had to count the times my computer experienced an hardware failure, the huge majority was always after a restart initiated by me. I restart my computers as rarely as possible and other than required restarts (Windows update, certain application installations requiring it) I only restart it if them if I have a problem that I think may be solved by a restart.

  9. #8
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    California & Arizona
    Posts
    5,444
    Thanks
    128
    Thanked 495 Times in 455 Posts
    It sounds as if he is going a little bit overboard on his habbit of restarting, but I don't think it will be anymore detrimental;
    1. Your typically not getting any more or less disk activity than any other usage, except maybe over use of defragmenting utilities.
    2. As others have pointed out, component thermal wear will not be an issue.

    I've had a habbit of doing that in XP, mainly to flush the memory & free resources, but it probably isn't needed so much in newer hardware and operating systems.
    I have never encountered any type of restart problem specifically as a result of such a habbit.

  10. #9
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Big Indian, New York
    Posts
    1,854
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 63 Times in 52 Posts
    I usually leave my PC on during the day and sometimes put it to sleep or turn it off if I'm going to be busy doing something else that will keep me away from the computer.

    I would estimate I do about 3 or 4 cold boot restarts during the day.
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  11. #10
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    19
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    It's not so much the number of restarts: it's the mechanism. If you let Windoze shut itself down then restart, you'll (usually) be fine. If you get impatient and hit the power button/pull the plug etc, then you run a serious risk of damaging your hard-drive either by head crashes (although modern drives are pretty good this way: they lift and park the heads as soon as the power fails) or by corrupting files because Windoze was in the middle of writing a vital file when you killed it. If it happened to be writing to the registry or a start-up file then you may render your PC unbootable (been there, done that...)

    Moral is: shut down using the correct mechanism and don't get impatient...

  12. #11
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Middelburg, Zeeland, Netherlands
    Posts
    148
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Hi all,
    I'd like to hear a comment on this issue from the hd manufacturers. Or don't they read this lounge? :-(

    grtz Sjors

  13. #12
    Silver Lounger Banyarola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Big Indian, New York
    Posts
    1,854
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 63 Times in 52 Posts
    I remember back in the DOS days I used a program called PARK which I would run before shutting down to park the heads...
    "If You Are Reading This In English, Thank A VET"

  14. #13
    Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    43
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
    It's not the hard drive you ought to be especially concerned about - it's the stress to the whole system.

    I reboot only when absolutely needed - whether it's a kernel update, new video driver, or one of my own damfool mistakes. That said, I think the longest uptime was only three months or so. Part of my reason for leaving the system on is participating in World Community Grid - the more crunching time, the better.

    Now that I think back, with XP, I re-started once a week as part of normal maintenance. I run it now as a virtual machine, so I don't think re-boots there are an issue.

  15. #14
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    44
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Smile interesting thread

    I was interested in the responses and surprised that even now there is no definitive answer to this "age old" question. I date back to when a 300MB disk drive was about 3' by 3' and failed about every year or sooner if there were lightning storms. Then, wow, someone invented the "Winchester" disk (what we now call HD) that had, as I recall, 10,000 hrs MTTF (mean time to failure). The MTTF used to be published as part of the advertising by manufacturers. The last time I saw MTTF published, I think, showed MTTF of 40,000 hours. I bet it is still in the spec sheets from WD and Seagate.

    Bottom line, I believe that after your HD as been cycled on and off for a few weeks, it may last about 5 years unless you bang it WHEN IT's RUNNING.
    Paulbyr in NC

  16. #15
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Posts
    136
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 19 Times in 18 Posts
    Are you talking about a cold boot (computer turned off and then restarted) or a warm boot (computer not powered off)? A warm boot will not power down the HD.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •