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  1. #1
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    A simple fix for hangs when closing applications




    LANGALIST PLUS

    A simple fix for hangs when closing applications


    By Fred Langa

    One likely culprit for application hangs is Windows' "Client/Server Runtime Subsystem."

    Fixing it used to be a hassle, but a relatively new automated Fix-it from Microsoft can make it one-click simple.


    The full text of this column is posted at windowssecrets.com/langalist-plus/a-simple-fix-for-hangs-when-closing-applications/ (paid content, opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.
    Last edited by Kathleen Atkins; 2011-08-24 at 16:12.

  2. #2
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    Too frequent Firefox updates could be a good reason for me to use IE, Chrome is as bad if not worse.

    My main reason for using Firefox is the customisation via extensions.
    Version 6 claimed to have important security fixes, so I installed it and lost Quicknote, Vertical Toolbar & Screen Capture Elite due to them being "Incompatible".
    After a couple of days I had a look at the Change Log for V6 at Moz - there was NO indication of any security fixes, so I decided to revert to V5 next morning.
    Started Firefox next morning, only to find Quicknote & Vertical were now available - new versions had NOT been installed.
    VT is dated 2011-06-29 and QN even earlier - BIZARRE. Still waiting for SC-Elite.

    From now on I'll read the Change Log carefully first, https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/releases/
    If there's no security fixes or "I must have that" feature then I'll wait for the next release.
    If that doesn't work out I'll switch to IE.

  3. #3
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Firefox not telling users what version they are running looks to me like the final nail in Mozilla's coffin. They will regret this til the day the last user finally gives up on Firefox, which won't take long.

    I like Chrome, and with a few Extensions installed, it serves me very well on Windows 7 Home Premium 63-bit. Chrome starts faster than IE9, and is more stable against unexpected freezes and crashes. The updates have never broken an Extension in my experience. Very different from Firefox, where there seems to be a 50% chance of some Extension breaking and no update being available with each new version upgrade. Not to mention frequent profile breakages.

    IE is OK, don't get me wrong. But I still prefer Chrome. Firefox as it has become recently, you can keep!
    -- Bob Primak --

  4. #4
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    Cool What about the Windows "Recovery" partition?

    In Fred's response to "Power failure trashes reinstall attempt," he didn't answer one of Tom Osif's questions:

    "So I have a few questions: ...Second, do I need the recovery partition? If not, how do I delete it to free up space?"

    That one's worth an answer. First, let's get on the same page with Microsoft. What Tom is calling the "recovery" partition is officially known as the "system" partition (yeah, I know!!!) and is entirely optional (but the Win7 installer will create it automatically if you let it; FYI, it's not where Windows 7 is installed--that's called the "boot partition" in Win7 lingo).

    Per Microsoft Technet:

    "You can use system partitions to:

    • Manage and load other partitions. If there are multiple operating systems, for example, Windows 7 and Windows Vista®, the computer displays a list of operating systems. The user can then select which operating system to use.
      .
    • Use security tools, such as Windows® BitLocker™ Drive Encryption.
      .
    • Use recovery tools, such as Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE)."
    Per Microsoft, the System Partition provides for those three different functions, none of which have anything to do with Windows 7's stability (which I point out so that none of you are worried about this point). If you so wish (and don't need one of the above three capabilities), you can avoid creating a separate System Partition upon installation; it can also be safely removed after installation.

    The above information is true for both x86 and x64 installs. I should say that my installation experience is strictly with x64, so I can't comment on whether an x86 installation automatically gets the separate System Partition or not. In any case, that would happen on an x64 installation only if the target HDD is unallocated (or if you choose to delete all existing partitions during the installation).

    While it's also correct that the official name is "System Partition," you may also see the term "system recovery partition" (sound familiar?) being used on online forums (including on MS Technet) for the System Partition. While that alternative term is obviously informal, it's an understandable usage, given that system recovery is the one of the three functions of the System Partition that the majority of non-enterprise users would encounter.

  5. #5
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Yeah, but what's 100 MB among friends? It isn't taking up that much space, so why delete it?
    -- Bob Primak --

  6. #6
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    "So I have a few questions: ...Second, do I need the recovery partition? If not, how do I delete it to free up space?"
    Windows 7 will automatically set up a 100 MB partition upon clean install that can be deleted with just about any 3rd party partition management tool.
    I use Easeus Partition Master Home Edition 6.5.2 to delete mine. The partition is set aside for MS BitLocker and is empty if BitLocker is not utilized.
    The partition is independant of any kind of recovery implementation, so you will still be able to boot your W7 and get at the recovery console.

    The 100 MB partition is one of my greatest installation annoyances in W7 and should be optional upon clean install, ...but it isn't.


    The 100 MB partition is not a big deal but for some of us it's a real annoyance.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator jwitalka's Avatar
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    Clint, The Windows 7 recovery partition is not used just for bitlocker. It is used for boot recovery tools when Windows won't boot. See Bethel's answer above.

    Jerry

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