Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 46
  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,070
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 132 Times in 86 Posts

    Tame a new system's hard-drive bloat




    TOP STORY

    Tame a new system's hard-drive bloat


    By Susan Bradley

    You just bought that new Windows 7 computer, and the next thing you know — you're running out of space.

    Here are some tips and tricks to show where your hard drive space is going.

    The full text of this column is posted at WindowsSecrets.com/top-story/tame-a-new-systems-hard-drive-bloat/ (opens in a new window/tab).

    Columnists typically cannot reply to comments here, but do incorporate the best tips into future columns.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator RetiredGeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Manning, South Carolina
    Posts
    9,436
    Thanks
    372
    Thanked 1,457 Times in 1,326 Posts
    Gave the Service Pack cleanup command a go and it worked OK. Well, at least I managed to do a Restart w/o problem. Please note that, at least on my i5 laptop running Win 7 SP-1 64 bit, the disk drive ran like a bugger for about 10+ minutes after the text mode status bar indicated 100%. Unfortunately, I had a senior moment and forgot to check my C: drive's space usage before running the command so I can't report how much space I got back.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    May the Forces of good computing be with you!

    RG

    PowerShell & VBA Rule!

    My Systems: Desktop Specs
    Laptop Specs

  3. #3
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    65
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Tree Size Excellent in Controlling Bloat

    In a few seconds, Tree Size reveals (in descending order) the chief offenders in hogging disk space. Since Windows is a bloat machine, Tree Size is a vital tool in trimming wasted space.

    The beauty of this utility is it not only identifies the biggest space hogs, but lets a user view them individually-- program by program-- within the Explorer-style folder tree. A user can drill down well beyond six levels deep, to actually expose the specific program responsible.

    At that point, the program can be deleted, if appropriate.

    When I discovered Tree Size about one year ago, I spread the word whenever possible-- and continue to use it to keep my regular Windows environment as clean as possible.

  4. #4
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    31
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 2 Posts

    WindirStat - an alternative to TreesSize

    I've used a tool complimentary to TreeSize, that is WinDirStat: http://windirstat.info/ . It also helps identify "space wasters", but it does so visually. It uses the "treemapping" technique of displaying files and folders as blocks. The size of each block is relative. You can drill down in folders.

    On the 1 or more partition question I vote for "more". At a very minimum I recommend C: for
    Windows and Apps, D: for personal DATA files. This way you can restore windows/apps without worrying about nuking your personal data. Part of this approach requires redirecting your Windows profile to the D: drive. That includes your desktop, docs and IE favorites folders to name the "big 3".

    Given the size of HD's shipping with new computers these days, 200-500+GB, partitioning makes sense. Setting aside 50-70GB for the C:, gives you lots of room for adding apps, while leaving lots of room for data files. Separating OS from Data allows you to customize your backup strategy, setting different frequencies and types Full Image or Incremental, based on changes to files.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to ron007 For This Useful Post:

    uncledunc (2011-09-19)

  6. #5
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    164
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 16 Times in 14 Posts
    HARDLINKS

    Article has "That's because a file can be located in two places the ..."

    It would be better to have ""That's because the same file (data) can be referenced in multiple directories (folders) (up to 1024) the ...",

    It's the data that takes up the space, the directory entries (hardlinks) are stored in pre-allocated space known as the Master File Table (MFT) - see here for details http://support.microsoft.com/default...;en-us;Q174619.

    AFAIK things like FolderSizes & WinDirStat do not discount the space for files that are referenced from multiple directories - although I've not looked at most recent versions. The reason that these utilities count every hardlink as consuming space, is that to do otherwise would require them to create a partial reverse lookup database - which would itself take space not to mention considerable time.
    Last edited by northwood2222; 2011-08-25 at 03:42.

  7. #6
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Fort Myers Fl USA
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    What we need is a way to move programs and data, with new Registry entries and Hard links etc. Those of us not prescient enough to separate data from programs sure could use a way to do it ex post facto.

  8. #7
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    The thing that struck me the most about the article was Susan's admission that if you followed her advice and manually installed Windows SP1, unneeded files would have been left on your system, which then have to be got rid of by running the command prompt clean up - whereas if you ignored her advice and only installed SP1 when it became available to you though Windows Update, all the unneeded files would have been deleted automatically! So although I don't like to say so, maybe there is a lesson to be learned from this story?

  9. #8
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    164
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 16 Times in 14 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by pdl1 View Post
    What we need is a way to move programs and data, with new Registry entries and Hard links etc. Those of us not prescient enough to separate data from programs sure could use a way to do it ex post facto.
    I think of it this way - programs are the tools (saws, chisels, hammers, drills, needles, spoons, mixers etc), data is the material (wood, tinplate, fabric, eggs, flour, eggs etc)

    If I move a chisel from a bench to toolbox, I'd prefer that the wood to stay where I put it

    @essex133 - pssst I rarely follow Susan's advice, but I also don't run a "corporate" network, our six boxes run with no restriction, UAC off, and WU on - no problems, even with .NET.
    Last edited by northwood2222; 2011-08-25 at 09:08.

  10. #9
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Service Pack clean?

    I tried but got this msg:Capture.JPG
    any ideas for next step?
    Thanks,
    Ron

  11. #10
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    2,654
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 113 Times in 97 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by essex133 View Post
    The thing that struck me the most about the article was Susan's admission that if you followed her advice and manually installed Windows SP1, unneeded files would have been left on your system, which then have to be got rid of by running the command prompt clean up - whereas if you ignored her advice and only installed SP1 when it became available to you though Windows Update, all the unneeded files would have been deleted automatically! So although I don't like to say so, maybe there is a lesson to be learned from this story?
    Remember that you have to balance this with whether you may at some point need to uninstall SP1. If you run the command prompt clean up, you will make SP1 a permanent part of Windows 7 without the ability to uninstall the service pack. This can be very important if you only have the original Win7 DVD and want to attempt a repair installation of Windows 7 to fix problems without the necessity of reinstalling all your apps and data afterward. If you are unable to uninstall SP1 from you current Win7 install, your original pre SP1 Win7 DVD will not allow you to do a repair install unless and until you remove SP1. Also, downloading and installing the full service pack assures a more trouble free installation than does relying on Windows Update to install SP1.

    The easiest way to get around this is to do an image backup of your system partition, if you know it to be healthy, and then run the command prompt clean up as Susan indicated. After successfully cleaning up and consequently making SP1 permanent, another image backup can be made so you can restore the image if your Windows 7 installation becomes broken and in need of repair.

    You can get an abundance of information on imaging in the Security & Backups Forum.

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Deadeye81 For This Useful Post:

    bobprimak (2011-08-25),uncledunc (2011-09-19)

  13. #11
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    personal data on different partition

    "benefits to multiple partitions. The first is the ability to separate your personal data from system data"

    I agree and it was an easy registry fix under XP , but how do you accomplish it under Win 7

  14. #12
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    2,654
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 113 Times in 97 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by rpinsc View Post
    I tried but got this msg:Capture.JPG
    any ideas for next step?
    Thanks,
    Ron
    Hi Ron, and welcome to the Lounge!

    Did you right click the Command Prompt menu item as Susan depicted in her article and select "Run as Administrator"?

    Although you likely are using an Administrator profile, in Windows 7 you are part of the Administrator Group, and are not running with the highest privileges. Running Command Prompt with the "Run as Administrator" command temporarily elevates your privileges to that of The Administrator account in Windows 7, which is much like the Administrator account in XP.

  15. #13
    Lounger
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Did that just to make sure my shortcut on cmd.exe was still good. And got the same msg. Could it be possible that let Win7 update automatically SP1, and there is nothing there? Too old to remember if I or Win7 did that update....
    Quote Originally Posted by Deadeye81 View Post
    Hi Ron, and welcome to the Lounge!

    Did you right click the Command Prompt menu item as Susan depicted in her article and select "Run as Administrator"?

    Although you likely are using an Administrator profile, in Windows 7 you are part of the Administrator Group, and are not running with the highest privileges. Running Command Prompt with the "Run as Administrator" command temporarily elevates your privileges to that of The Administrator account in Windows 7, which is much like the Administrator account in XP.

  16. #14
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    164
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 16 Times in 14 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by bobmcaap View Post
    "benefits to multiple partitions. The first is the ability to separate your personal data from system data"

    I agree and it was an easy registry fix under XP , but how do you accomplish it under Win 7
    if you mean My Documents/Pictures etc, then

    1. go to c:/users/<yourusername/ in Windows Explorer,
    2. right click the folder you want to move,
    3. select Properties,
    4. select the Location Tab
    5. enter the new location and click the Move button,
    6. repeat for the other folders you want to move.

    There's probably 4 other ways to do that, but its the one I found and it works fine.

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to northwood2222 For This Useful Post:

    uncledunc (2011-09-19)

  18. #15
    Super Moderator Deadeye81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    2,654
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 113 Times in 97 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by rpinsc View Post
    Did that just to make sure my shortcut on cmd.exe was still good. And got the same msg. Could it be possible that let Win7 update automatically SP1, and there is nothing there? Too old to remember if I or Win7 did that update....
    No, "Run as Administrator" ensures you are running the software at the most elevated privilege level, which some tasks require.

    If Windows Update installed SP1, then there would not be anything to clean up, as WU cleans up after the SP1 install.

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to Deadeye81 For This Useful Post:

    rpinsc (2011-08-25)

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •