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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    Windows 7 64-bit, Firefox 6 & Who Knows What Else

    I have posted this thread in another forum so if you saw it there then you know the issues.

    I have read Fred's article on non-destructive re-installs and have a question, specifically should I do that or should I go back to either a clean image backup made very soon after Windows 7 Home Premium was installed on my SSD C: drive, one done 10 days later which had more programs already installed and so I would only need to reinstall current data files to the programs?

    My system keeps locking up, always when the newest version of Firefox is running. I can be away from the computer and come back to it locked up. Event Viewer shows frequent Error incidents having to do with DCOM and Service Manager problems that seem to be associated with my printer, and also seems to show a HP Photosmart Printer even though we have an OfficeJet printer and never had a Photosmart during the life of this computer.

    When the system locks and I have to push and hold the off button to shut it down (which isn't the way I like to do it but nothing else works) I get the following inside Event Viewer. I also suspect that message is being written BEFORE I push and hold the off button, but I can't confirm that.

    Critical 9/5/2011 4:46:28 PM Kernel-Power 41 (63)

    So, back to the question, am I better off doing a non-destructive re-install or just going back to an image and doing it that way? If an image. do I go to the one made hours after the computer had Windows 7 Home Premium installed, or the one about ten days later? Or, as an alternative, is there a good program to diagnose the problem better than I have done?

    Thanks in advance for any guidance. (I will be out for a few hours and will check the thread in awhile.

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I would definitely restore to the latest Image you have when the OS was working properly. I create new Images whenever I make changes to my system. This way when I screw something up (I am constantly trying new things and messing with the OS which invariably screws things up) I can be back to where I was in 10 minutes. How could it get better than that.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    I actually backup daily on both the SSD C: and the original HDD that came with computer and should still be bootable if I change the BIOS to load D: first. If I do that I will also probably do a low level reformat and wipe of the SSD. Do you agree with that?

    Now I really am leaving. Thanks.
    Last edited by john181818; 2011-09-06 at 13:06. Reason: Added last sentence

  4. #4
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    If you restore the SSD from the Image it will reformat the drive before restoring your OS. Kill 2 birds with 1 stone so to speak.
    BACKUP...BACKUP...BACKUP
    Have a Great Day! Ted


    Sony Vaio Laptop, 2.53 GHz Duo Core Intel CPU, 8 GB RAM, 320 GB HD
    Win 8 Pro (64 Bit), IE 10 (64 Bit)


    Complete PC Specs: By Speccy

  5. #5
    4 Star Lounger
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    Agreed, there's no reason to do a low level format, especially on an SSD if the partition is already properly aligned. You might want to check and see if there's a firmware update for it though if you haven't.

  6. #6
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    LLF verifies each sector of a real hard drive, leaving them with all zero's written to every location, blocking out bad sectors as it proceeds. That whole process is Null and Void with an SSD. It's not really a hard drive at all, but a HUGE version of a Flash Drive, with memory chips instead of rotating platters, with read/write heads floating above them. Eh?

    Like Ted, I evaluate many programs in a weeks time, so I keep current backups of my C: drive on a separate hard drive, just in case of disaster.

    But the first line of defense, is not the Ghost backup on D: drive, , , it's my last Restore Point, created every time I boot up my PC.
    That is so important to me, that I put a script in my Startup folder to FORCE a new restore point on every boot or RE-Start.

    I also do that for my customers that seem to get into trouble frequently.

    Cheers Mates!
    The Doctor
    Experience is truly the best teacher.

    Backup! Backup! Backup! GHOST Rocks!

  7. #7
    4 Star Lounger
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    Yeah, I love restore points. Some will argue hoof and tail about it though, say they only need to make an image and turn system restore off. I say why the hell would you go get the shotgun every time when a six-shooter can take care of the problem in a jiff. Truly one of the most useful utilities Microsoft has ever come up with for Windows. I run at least 30 to 1 ratio of restore points used over image restores needed (spread over at least 14 computers); makes life so much easier...wished my bicycle tyres came with a restore point...then life would be perfect...but so far I'm stuck there.

    And for the OP, did you try ditching Firefox and was it ok then?
    Last edited by Infinicore; 2011-09-07 at 18:47.

  8. #8
    2 Star Lounger
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    Well here's my $2 cents. I learned a long long time ago that just because a new update or version is available it isn't always really needed. I know many people who update simply because there is a new update. If you were running Firefox and it worked great, why go to the latest and greatest version? I run an old version of Firefox and it does everything I want it to. I have no reason to update the version, it is very compatible with my system, all the add-on's I want to run work, etc. If you are noticing this problem ONLY when you use Firefox (I'm assuming you don't have this problem with IE or Chrome) then the issue is somewhere in this version of Firefox and its compatiblilty with your system. If your running an older computer then as time goes on new stuff simple won't work. Why don't you try unistalling that version of Firefox and go back in time to one that may fix your problem?

    http://www.oldversion.com/

    Its also possible it could be a issue between your firewall or anti-virus. Have you tried turning them off and see if your computer still does what it's doing? Additionally, are you running add-on's in Firefox? Some add-on's can cause you fits.
    Last edited by James S; 2011-09-08 at 10:25.

  9. #9
    New Lounger
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    Just to answer everyone things continue to deteriorate and I am going to restore from a backup when the OS was 10 days old and well before any problems appeared. The truth is had I not waited this long I would have a more current backup to restore from, but instead of restoring when I could (and should) I waited too long and the last ones that were known good 5-6 weeks ago have been overwritten. I saved both a newly installed and another 10 days later in a special location on the external drive just for this reason. But I have waited too long to use the more recent ones that are likely carrying some or all of the errors that are causing me to do this.

    I have just made special backups of my Quicken, Outlook pst and document files in addition to the ones that are still stored in the recent backups and can be accessed if needed via file and folder restores to a virtual drive and then copying and pasting. I also had the foresight long ago to have a special Download folder, which is maintained on my HDD data drive in the same computer so those files will be there. As a final measure, when I installed the HDD and relegated the HDD from the primary drive to a data drive, I left it bootable so I have one more fallback.

    The problems keep coming now so that when I think I have it fixed, I still seem to develop problems. So once the last incremental backup I am making now is finished I will shutdown the system, unplug the system, open it up and check all connections, unplug all the USB's except my mouse, keyboard and external drive, and then reinstall. The good news is that should only take 45-60 minutes and then I will see what I have as far as errors and stability. If it is good then I will slowly add things over the next few days. If this backup isn't good for any reason (which I don't expect) I have the initial backup after Windows was first installed and I will go to that, but I think that won't be necessary.

    I'll let you know how this went once I am back up and stable.

  10. #10
    New Lounger
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    It has been an interesting 24 hours.

    I re-installed from an image dated March 13th, which was ten days after I had first loaded Windows 7 on the SSD, for which I also had an image backup, so that I could hopefully avoid reinstalling a bunch of software. The image restored fine but I ran into trouble quickly. I enabled Norton 360 and let it install all of it's updates with a number of reboots and all seemed well. I then turned to the Windows Updates, which had something like 43 important downloads and let the Important ones run at once. That didn't work very well and the computer sat on the actual final Shutdown Screen for a good 30 minutes before I finally hit the shutoff button and everything uninstalled from the failed shutdown. I had problems on reboot once I got in and went back and did another image reinstall from 3/13.

    The second time I disabled Norton for 5 hours and let the Windows Updates run the same way and I had problems again, but I was able to ascertain that the problems seemed to be coming from the early August updates.

    Once again I reinstalled completely, disabled Norton for 5 hours and then went to Windows Update and only let it update one month at a time starting with April. This time things went much better. I was re-booting after each month and continued on month by month. I did not install Internet Explorer 9 since that had seemed to cause a problem and I also did not install the NET framework optional updates because they may have caused a problem. So as of now I have restored functionality, have restored all the correct profiles and data files into Outlook, Quicken, etc. and have made a new image backup of the system.

    So now, with a good current image in place I am considering trying to install the NET framework programs and IE9, knowing that I seem to have a stable environment with which I can return to.

    Thanks for the various hints and tricks. Maybe this will help someone else.

  11. #11
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    What a long, convoluted, pain-in-the-rear trip. Thanks for keeping us updated. Good luck with the rest and please let us know the final outcome.

    Joe

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