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  1. #1
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    Purchased 1st Laptop: Do I Need a Chilling Mat?

    I unexpectedly had to replace my desktop computer and purchased an ASUS laptop (i5 with 8 GB RAM). I've never had a laptop, but have read that overheating is often the element that kills them prematurely. I work part-time, home-based business, and want to be able to access my computer quickly if a prospective or current client calls. I used to keep my desktop on virtually 24/7, but wonder about the wisdom of doing that now?

    Does the "hibernate" function slow things down enough to keep the laptop cool without doing a full re-boot? Should I get a chill mat? I am one of those people who is always hot so keep the house about 73 degrees and I anticipate that the unit will be either in my office or living 95% of the time vs. needing to take my show on the road. I do have a lot of gadgets attached, mostly through a USB hub, if that makes a difference on the demands on the computer: adapter to use my favorite 7-year-old Dell keyboard, my equally old Altec Lansing speakers, wireless mouse and external hard drive plus will be buying a DVI-HDMI adapter to use my large HP monitor when in the office. I still need to assemble the laptop wheeled tray that I plan to use in the living room, but the laptop won't typically be placed on my lap for use, again if that makes a difference. Thus far, I'm only running the computer on power vs. battery. Software-wise, I mostly use the typical Microsoft Office apps plus Photoshop Elements. Sorry if I'm provide "TMI," but I don't really know what drives the temperature up vs. being "temp neutral."

    Thanks for any suggestions you can provide!

    Victoria, Laptop Newbie

  2. #2
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    Both hibernate and sleep will prevent the most heat generating components from working, so it will keep the temperature down. Hibernate will stop it using any energy at all.

    There are two laptops here and both use cooling stands. I bought them more to ensure that the wooden desks where they sit were no longer affected by the heat both generate (there was an obvious expansion of the wood and that wasn't good). Their use does not hurt the laptops, either.

  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Medico's Avatar
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    I think my biggest problem with my laptops is the extra heat generated when the battery is plugged into the laptop. I used to keep my battery plugged in all the time, but started having some intermittent BSOD problems. After pulling the battery when using the laptop on AC power at home, I haven't had another BSOD. I guess the extra heat added by the battery started causing some problems. I suppose a cooling/chilling mat may help, but just pulling the battery when plugged into the AC power seems just as effective. I do use a lap desltop because even with the battery pulled, the laptop gets warm on my lap without my lap desktop.

    I disabled hibernate and just use sleep and shutdown at night.
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  4. #4
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    I alwaysuse a Lapramp with my laptops.
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  5. #5
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Even without a cooler pad, always keep your laptop on a Clean, Hard surface, like a tabletop and NEVER on a cloth surface like a bed, rug or even on your lap. Cloth can block the air intake ports on the bottom of the laptop and cause Over-Heating.

    Don't overwork your laptop. The harder that you work your laptop, the more heat it will generate.
    I always set up laptops for my customers to run the very minimum of TSR's and Services.
    Then I tweak and tune Windows for the highest efficiency and set the shutdown time on the hard drive to something short, like five minutes.
    (the hard drive is one Major heat generator in any computer)
    Keeping hard drive usage to a minimum, also keeps the Heat to a minimum.

    Good Luck with that new PC!
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  6. #6
    Super Moderator BATcher's Avatar
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    In fact, continuing along the above line of reasoning, it is clear that the complete non-use of a laptop has been found to generate by far the least heat!

    A well-designed laptop subsequently kept dust- and fluff-free should generate comparatively little heat, and it is really only the battery which has real problems with heat. If you find your laptop generates too much heat for user comfort, then a fan cooler will assist - although that is really an admission of poor design by the laptop manufacturer (bear this in mind for next time round!). ruirib's comments can be agreed with.
    BATcher

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  7. #7
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    Forgive my ignorance regarding common abbreviations, but what do you mean by "TSR's and Services"? I admit that I'm not one to do lots of tweaking to optimize computer performance. I just want to install my application software and to what I need to do without playing around with the operating system. I guess that means I'm only a "nerdette" or nerd wannabe and not a full fledged nerd.

    I knew that one would be ill advised to place a laptop directly on a bed, chair or other upholstered surface so am good in that regard. The only time thus far that the computer seemed to be getting rather warm was when I was having to do a lot of software installation as is typical with any new computer. I am, of course, being careful to keep the area around the vents free of anything that would block the air flow. I hadn't really considered pulling the battery although, as noted, my current plans wouldn't normally include using the computer in battery mode often. Given the sometimes chaotic state of my office, I would worry that I would put the battery "some place safe" and then forget where I put the darned thing.

    Thanks so much for the input,
    Victoria

  8. #8
    Super Moderator CLiNT's Avatar
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    It's very unlikely any form of cooling mat will be needed unless you plan on running it in a poorly cooled environment all day, ... and do heavy graphical/processor work.
    The hibernate and or sleep functions would be well suited for an office laptop that is required to be "turned back on" quickly, and to save energy/reduce heat, if applicable.

    TSR's
    Short for Terminate-and-stay-resident, a TSR is a software program that remains in memory until it is needed, and then performs some function. An good example of a TSR is a Virus Scanner, which must remain loaded in memory to help protect your computer from computer viruses.
    How to remove TSR's

  9. #9
    Bronze Lounger DrWho's Avatar
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    Maybe a better example of a TSR that you can easily do without, would be the Adobe updater or Java update scheduler, found in the MSCONFIG> Startup folder. Anything in that startup list that you don't absolutely HAVE to have running all the time, should be UN-Checked so it won't load into memory on the next bootup.

    In services, which most users never see, there are a number of Services that will never be needed or used on the average HOME computer.

    In XP, I shut off 24 services and in Vista or 7, even more.
    The entire list of services that can either be disabled or put into Manual mode, can be found at the "Black Viper" website.
    It's a good read for anyone wanting to be more computer savy.

    Cheers Mates!

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  10. #10
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    Thanks for the input, All!!!
    Victoria

  11. #11
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Moderator Just Plain Fred posted his idea recently, http://windowssecrets.com/forums/sho...g-Modification
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  12. #12
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    Very creative although don't see that translating readily to a laptop. |;-)

    Victoria

  13. #13
    Lounge VIP bobprimak's Avatar
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    Think of TSRs in terms of Windows Startups, and manage them to a minimum.

    With so much RAM, if you ever use all that RAM (which is only likely in the case of playing HD Videos or some such high-intensity activities), you may need a chill-pad. Also true if the CPU high-speed mode or Discrete Graphics Mode is activated (again, gamers and HD Videpo watchers are most at risk). (Core-i5 processors have dual modes for different levels of demands.) Otherwise, on a hard, level surface, you should have few problems with heat. In their original configurations, very few non-Apple laptops overheat. And not that many Apple laptops either.
    -- Bob Primak --

  14. #14
    Star Lounger
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    Hi Victoria, you mentioned your battery but no one told you how keep it charged and stored so let me tell you what I do with mine.
    I put it in the laptop until fully charged then remove and place in a plastic bag. Remove as much air as possible then put it in the FREEZER. Once every month or so remove from the freezer and put it in the computer and fully discharge it, then recharge and put back in the freezer.
    This gets the most life out of the battery and its always ready when needed.

    Pops

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