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  1. #1
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    Best free software for Linux

    There may be many such sources, or this may have been posted before now, but for those who like to keep an eye out for such things Gizmo's Best list may be of interest.

  2. #2
    4 Star Lounger
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    I didn't see VMWare Player for LINUX. It works great and if run from an SSD, I can run Ubuntu (host of course), W7, and WinXP for free, free and, umm, oh yeah, FREE!! There is the matter of procuring a sufficiently fast and capacious SSD though...always a hitch somewhere in the best laid plans.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Infinicore View Post
    I didn't see VMWare Player for LINUX. It works great and if run from an SSD, I can run Ubuntu (host of course), W7, and WinXP for free, free and, umm, oh yeah, FREE!! There is the matter of procuring a sufficiently fast and capacious SSD though...always a hitch somewhere in the best laid plans.
    \

    I am still struggling to get something (Ubuntu) up and running from a flash drive (Would a fast 32 GB drive do?) with free, free, FREE data recovery software on it.

  4. #4
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    If Ubuntu or any LINUX distro didn't just do what it does (find most or all of the drivers it needs), I wouldn't know what to do about getting an install to work...try another computer I guess.
    I need about 120 gigs of SSD to make it all work. XP and Ubuntu could live on 32 gigs, a little crowded but doable, either by itself easy. Its W7 that fills up the room; she dances pretty good for fat girl, but she's still fat.

  5. #5
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    It really depends what the objective is. If the purpose of the flash drive is data recovery than a flash drive should be fast and a fairly elegant solution. Alternatively, you could use a 32GB SD card to boot from and save your SSD or other external drive for the recovered data. For data recovery, Hiren's boot CD is an excellent toolset which includes bootable Linux with partition/disk recovery/backup tools as well as a mini windows environment and low level disk/hardware diagnostics and repair tools from many manufacturers. there a anumber of CD based live boot environments which allow you to load them entirely into RAM so you can remove the CD from the drive and use it to burn backups to DVD etc

  6. #6
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    Don't miss this at Gizmo's

    Ubuntu tips and tricks. There's also one for Mint, pretty much the same stuff. But these articles are hard to find.

    http://www.techsupportalert.com/cont...and-tricks.htm

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