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  1. #1
    4 Star Lounger
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    You do not have permission to save in this directory.

    I'm trying to figure out how administrative privileges are used in Windows 7. So far the explanations I've found have been incomplete or unclear.

    Here's a particular situation that alarms me.

    I installed a program in Program Files (x86), confirmed that it runs, then spent considerable time adjusting settings in its configuration file. I saved the settings and ran the program. No effect. Puzzled, I opened Windows Explorer to make sure that the file had been updated, and found that it had not. I assumed I saved it to the wrong place, but did an exhaustive search and convinced myself that I did not. Finally I copied the whole file from my preferred editor to Notepad, tried to save again, and got the message in my title line.

    Apparently when at least some pre-Win7 applications try to save a file to a directory that requires administrative privilege, they aren't told that the save failed in any way they can recognize. Result: the application thinks the data has been saved; I think the data has been saved; but it hasn't been.

    That scares the bejeezus out of me.

    If I can't run a pre-Win7 application and be confident that it will tell me when Windows doesn't allow it to t save a file, my life is going to become very difficult. Some of the programs I use are very old indeed (one of them dates back to the days of Windows 3.1), because I've never found more modern replacements that work well for me.

    Is any less extreme way to avoid this trap than to stop using any application that has not been designed for use with Microsoft's latest operating system?

  2. #2
    Gold Lounger Roderunner's Avatar
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    Do it with UAC disabled, then re enable when done.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!

  3. #3
    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    Just had a thought...

    Create a new folder eg "C:\Legacy Program Files" and install your older programs there.

    As you will be the owner of that folder you shouldn't get permission errors and you won't need to change any of the default Windows settings/permissions.

  4. #4
    4 Star Lounger
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    Disabling UAC sounds like a good measure to take, and I'll look into it. It doesn't solve the root problem, though, which is that whenever I forget to do it, I risk losing work. What I really want is a way to ensure that (a) the data loss situation can never happen, or (b) I will always be warned when it does.

    Putting my legacy programs in a new folder doesn't make sense to me -- why should UAC care where a program is stored when the program tries to perform an operation that requires privilege? To me that appears to negate the advantage of having UAC in the first place. But I don't understand a lot about how Microsoft implemented UAC, so I'll look into that, too.

  5. #5
    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    UAC will kick in when you try to write to a system folder (of which Program Files (x86) is one of many)

    Creating a user folder as I suggested above allows you to install older programs that keep their settings within their own directory without falling foul of Windows security.

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