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  1. #16
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    I think you will find a flurry of 'Black Friday' specials ('Black Friday' being a US term, for those of us who live elsewhere), and my inbox is crammed with them. Those who followed the thread on 'alternatives' may be interested in Corel's offerings, including similarly spectacular deals on WordPerfect Office Suite (and other Corel software), but if you google it I suggest you leave the Black Friday out of it or you will be inundated with hits on Corelle (dinnerware) which is also having a Black Friday sale. Adobe has 'up to' 30% off, but it's the same price for me as the last time I priced it in the Spring, Britannica has a one-day sale this Thursday, and so on. It's one of those annual rituals for consumers (which investors will watch like a hawk).

    For anyone who takes one of the WordPerfect (or CorelDraw) offers, don't forget to download the necessary service releases and hot patches, the latest of which are very recent. With Office you (presumably) get your updates through Windows Updates, but even there remember to patch it as soon as it is installed.

    See Wikipedia entry for Black Friday.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jscher2000 View Post
    This part confuses me (footnote 1): "Software is licensed for evaluation purposes only—not for use in production environments." Does that mean we can't use the included versions of Office for real work? Are they serious?
    'Production environments' and 'Evaluation purposes' are both subject to interpretation.

    I think it may be argued that the bottom line is the bottom line: are you making any money from it YET? If you write a book and it returns a profit, then you are a earning income from it. Once that happens, then from that point forward (it would stifle innovation to make it retroactive) you may reasonably be expected to pay for all acquisitions of future software - that is how they are most likely to acquire loyal clients for such software. If you are an enterprise and you are 'in business' but you are still in the red, then both sides can call in the accountants, but we all know who has the deeper pockets when push comes to shove. It seems likely that the better interests of both sides are best-served by a cooperative and friendly relationship that means that you, assuming you are an unpublished writer, can write your first book and if and only if it returns a profit are you bound to start buying the software. Remember, you paid (in my case) an arm and a leg to 'evaluate' the software, which benefits Microsoft as much as it does me. Remember as well, that you can now do your writing in the clouds for nothing, apart from sleepless nights over the possible misappropriation of your intellectual property.

  3. #18
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    Make sure to check with your IT department at work. My employer has a program included in their site license for Microsoft Office which allowed me to purchase a copy to use on my home computer. I have Office Pro (which includes Access) and it only cost me $20. The software came directly to me from Microsoft. It is worth checking to see if your company has a similar plan.

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